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View Full Version : Got Me an ASM Colt Walker


BugSlayer
November 5, 2008, 07:04 PM
I just recently bought a Colt Walker by ASM, S/N 63358 and need to know a few things. The pistol looks in GREAT shape and appears not to have been fired very many times. The action is tight, the barrel and cylinder are tight, no looseness anywhere that I can tell. No rust, no marks, good finish and fit, and it was at a very good (IMHO) price. I just can't wait to go shootin'!

Does anyone out there have any practical experience with this brand of gun? (I've seen some negative stuff in the forums and I'm not interested in gratuitous negativity, so please refrain.) What can I expect from use and what limits should I keep in mind? Is there special care needs of the gun? Where can I find parts such as nipples, replacement screws, etc. when or if the need arises? What loads and bullet sizes should I use? Really, anything useful and helpful and positive would be greatly appreciated.

Fingers McGee
November 5, 2008, 07:39 PM
Does anyone out there have any practical experience with this brand of gun? With ASM in general; but not with one of their Walkers.

What can I expect from use and what limits should I keep in mind? You can expect lots of smoke, big booms, and smiles that won't go away. :D These horse pistols will take pretty much whatever you can stand to shoot in them; but, I've found that 40-45 gr of fffg is easy to handle and accurate in a big pistol like this.

Is there special care needs of the gun? Not knowing your experience with C&Bs, the Walker needs no more than any other C&B; other than the falling loading lever syndrome. Some use rubber bands on the barrel to keep it up, some use other items to tie it up. A little grinding on the lever and bending of the latch helps keep it up on its own.

Where can I find parts such as nipples, replacement screws, etc. when or if the need arises? VTI Gunparts carreis some parts for ASM revolvers as does Dixie Gun Works.

What loads and bullet sizes should I use? IIRC, a .454 rb, wonder wad & 40 gr of fffg Goex was my target load. If I wanted to impress someone; I'd jack it up to 60 gr.

Really, anything useful and helpful and positive would be greatly appreciated. Hope I was helpful. I've had various Walkers over the years; but, dont currently own one, so these recommendations are from the mental archives.

mykeal
November 5, 2008, 08:59 PM
I own a Uberti Walker and an ASM Walker. Fingers hit the X on all counts. My ASM Walker shoots as well as the Uberti; the only difference is fit and finish.
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/mykealsm/Guns/Colt%20Walker/130003.jpg
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/mykealsm/Guns/Colt%20Walker/1682.jpg

BugSlayer
November 5, 2008, 10:00 PM
Want to say many thanks for the responses!!
Fingers:
Great info! This is my 2nd C&B gun, the first being a T&C .50 Hawken kit I built about 20+ years ago. I LOVE shooting BP! I also am aware of the extra care a C&B firearm requires. I'll make note of the places for parts and such.
Mykeal:
Great photos! I will brag on my ASM, though: It looks more like your Uberti in the bottom photo as far as finish coloration. As far as fit goes, I would have to do a hand in hand comparison to tell the difference if any.

I am hoping for a long life of shooting with this pistol and will post my reactions when I get to it!

Once again, THANKS!!:D

bprevolver
November 7, 2008, 11:53 AM
The only manufacturers who have produced the 1847 Walker are Uberti and Armi San Marco. ASM is now not longer in the business of producing the percussion revolvers. I have an article from back in the 1960's that relate the first productions of the Walker by ASM were the most exact copy of the Walker. Most all replica revolver manufacturers have done a few things to make the replicas different from original production guns in order to discourage counterfeiting. Things like metric threads on screws, alter barrel lengths by 1/8" to 1/4", slightly undersized from original, etc. In the beginnings of the replica percussion revolver production collectors were afraid that there would be a mass attempt at counterfeiting. This never happened. In fact there have been several expert machinist and gunsmiths who were actually making replica specifically for fraud before the advent of the replica revolver industry. If you collect the old guns it is still buyer beware.