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View Full Version : Texas silencer info needed


westy
October 23, 2008, 08:32 AM
How long do I need to be a resident in a city or county in Texas before tring to purchase my first silencer? Reciently I moved to a city where class 3 aprovals are easier to get but should I wait a few months before tring to get my first one?
Westy

VUPDblue
October 23, 2008, 10:28 AM
No restrictions, do it now, don't wait!

cchardwick
October 23, 2008, 07:55 PM
I just got an AAC-M42000 suppressor for my Bushmaster (still waiting to get it). One thing that many people don't realize about the noise reduction in decibels is that it is a logrithmic scale. So compared to a -10db reduction, -20db is ten times the reduction. -30db would be 100 times as quiet as -10db. So if you compare a -30db to a -35db, it doesn't seem like that much of a difference on paper but the -35 is five times quieter!

hoytinak
October 23, 2008, 08:00 PM
There's no restrictions here in the great state of Texas. BTW: where you at in Texas?

cchardwick
October 23, 2008, 09:02 PM
Hey VUDPblue, I think you should change your signature:

Silencers have NEVER been illegal !

Although silencers have never been banned across the whole US by federal law, there are 15 states that do not allow civillian ownership of silencers, thus possession of a silencer in one of these states is a felony!

There are many state laws that conflict with federal law, but if either one outlaws something you have to follow that law, even though the other may allow it. For example, here in Denver you can legally own small amounts and smoke marijuana even though it's against federal law. But I've never seen anyone light up in public!

You could change it to say, "Silencers have NEVER been illegal in Colorado!"

;)

VUPDblue
October 23, 2008, 09:04 PM
Duly noted, but I'll be leaving it...

westy
October 24, 2008, 09:49 PM
Hello, I am in dfw Texas the Plano Garland area. Annyone know where to look for a list of class 3 dealers in my area?

hoytinak
October 24, 2008, 10:40 PM
Check out www.texasguntalk.com Talon Arms is a forum sponsor on there and they're a class III dealer.

Legion2600
October 27, 2008, 11:45 PM
Hello, I am in dfw Texas the Plano Garland area. Annyone know where to look for a list of class 3 dealers in my area?


Give Craig a call at www.rcsguns.com great guy to work with. Stocks just about all the big ones and VERY reasonable title II transfers if you buy from somebody else. he lives in Anna but works and will meet you in Addison. Tell 'em Jeff sent ya.

RAnb
October 28, 2008, 01:34 AM
The change in noise intensity can be expressed as 10^(dB/10). So reducing noise by a third is 2 dB, a 5x reduction is 3.2 dB, 10x is 10 db, 100x is 20 db, 1000x is 30 db and so on.

From what I have read, if you can barely hear the difference between two noise levels, then one is triple the intensity of the other, or a 2 decibel difference. So when my form 1 can sounded just a bit noisier than an AAC can I shot next to, it was really three times louder. :(

Here are a few TX dealers; http://www.subguns.com/c2c3/c3state.htm#Texas

Ranb

zippy13
October 28, 2008, 01:54 PM
One thing that many people don't realize about the noise reduction in decibels is that it is a logrithmic scale. So compared to a -10db reduction, -20db is ten times the reduction. -30db would be 100 times as quiet as -10db. So if you compare a -30db to a -35db, it doesn't seem like that much of a difference on paper but the -35 is five times quieter!
The change in noise intensity can be expressed as 10^(dB/10). So reducing noise by a third is 2 dB, a 5x reduction is 3.2 dB, 10x is 10 db, 100x is 20 db, 1000x is 30 db and so on.
You both are partially correct, logarithms are involved -- as are many quantities when great ranges are involved. However you fell into a common trap. We're familiar with the logarithmic (base10) Richter Scale of earthquake magnitudes -- for each whole number you go up, the amplitude of the ground motion recorded by a seismograph goes up ten times. This is a typical scale that's expressed logarithmically.
Sound measurements are different, they are measured logarithmically. Without getting into the numbers, for values expressing loudness in dB (SPL) you're actually involving a difference in sound pressure levels, not an absolute. It all works out that an increase of 20 dB (SPL) equals a ten fold increase in sound pressure. As a rule-of-thumb, a 6 dB increase doubles the sound pressure. For a conversion calculator click here (http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-soundlevel.htm).

http://www.sengpielaudio.com/RatiosEnergyPressure.gif

RAnb
October 28, 2008, 05:37 PM
So is SPL better suited for measuring impulse gun noise than SIL? Thanks.

Ranb

zippy13
October 28, 2008, 10:51 PM
Ranb
You're most welcome.

The use of dB (SLP) is fine for an example of the logarithmic aspect of the measurements. However, in reality you'd probably be measuring using SPL meter with a weighted curve such as dBA.