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View Full Version : 45lc inlaid grip,grooved grip


mike6975
September 28, 2008, 06:32 PM
anyone else like these or have something similar they've done to there grips?


mike

Hawg Haggen
September 28, 2008, 06:40 PM
I like inlays. I don't like finger grips. The scales are alright just not really my cup of tea.

mike6975
September 28, 2008, 06:53 PM
hey hawg if i made my own 45 inlays do you think fillin up the shell with an epoxy or somethin would strenghten it or would it be a waste of time?

Hawg Haggen
September 28, 2008, 07:25 PM
I don't think you'll have any shell to fill up. A case head is pretty thick unless you're planning on using an old balloon head case. As for gluing in place, an inlay ought to fit tight enough it doesn't need gluing.

Smokin_Gun
September 29, 2008, 01:50 AM
Nope but I like these...
http://i36.tinypic.com/2s10pio.jpg
http://i37.tinypic.com/ir0w3n.jpg
http://i36.tinypic.com/raw45j.jpg

SG

mike6975
September 29, 2008, 07:25 AM
i like those too especially the first one,and oh yeah!,"THE SOUTH SHALL RISE AGAIN":eek::D


mike

Hawg Haggen
September 29, 2008, 08:05 AM
Kinda off topic but I had this painted on the bow of a boat once. It was three feet tall and had FERGIT HELL painted over it in big red letters.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y269/rebel727/CWSTUFF/RebGeneral1.gif

mike6975
September 29, 2008, 09:03 AM
you are the MAN!! Hawg the MAN!!

Hawg Haggen
September 29, 2008, 10:13 AM
I useta be. Not anymore.:D

mike6975
September 29, 2008, 02:28 PM
as long as you think you can feel it bro!:)

FL-Flinter
September 29, 2008, 11:09 PM
Mike,

The inlay is no big deal, cartridge heads are fairly simple, it's when you get into complex inlay shapes, you have to match the radius of the wood that's when it becomes interesting.

Looking at the inlay pic, the first thing I noticed was the inconsistency of the grip to frame joint. Look near the inlay where the wood meets the frame and you'll notice that the wood is quite proud of the iron yet as you look closer to the bottom, you'll see that the iron is proud of the wood. I don't like the metal to ever be proud of the wood because it looks wrong and it can lead to the metal biting your hand on firing. The wood should be either just slightly proud of the metal or perfectly flush with the metal.

mike6975
September 30, 2008, 08:34 AM
i totally see that now that i payed attention to it,thanks for the insight.

mike:D

FL-Flinter
September 30, 2008, 10:31 PM
Mike,

When you do this stuff for a living, you tend to pay attention to those little things. Personally, if I'm refinishing the entire gun, I'll make the grips a little over-size then take them right down flush with the metal while they're on the gun so everything matches as closely as possible. If just replacing the wood, I'll leave it just slightly proud of the metal, about 0.006" to 0.010" at the most.

Another thing, if you're doing any kind of inlay, the inlay itself should be finished flush or just slightly under the surface of the wood so it doesn't take a beating during normal use & carry. If you want the inlay to stand-out, the area where the inlay is can be left higher then taper the wood rapidly to the "normal" height - this lets the inlay stand above the "nominal" surface elevation but still have its face remain flush with the wood so it's not standing out all by itself taking a beating all the time.

Mark

mike6975
October 1, 2008, 10:05 AM
thanks for the insight flinter,so you can go either or with it depending on what you or the person wants.me i like the flush look,and i'll use your input on the next set of grips i get.i'm ordering a set from dgw(dixie gun works),i should be able to do this with them i think?.


mike

FL-Flinter
October 1, 2008, 11:29 AM
Mike,

It all depends on how the grips are made - one of the reasons I don't care to order 'unknown' after-market grips is unless you know exactly who's making/selling them and how, it's usually a crap-shoot as to what you're getting. Some guns like Ruger's hold extremely tight tolerances on their machine and finishing work so it's much easier for a company to produce after-market grips that will usually be within acceptable OEM spec's. On others guns, tolerances are quite varied and while one may measure 2.125" at the base of the frame, the next one off the line may measure 2.200" - of course, the greater the OEM tolerances, the more difficult it becomes for an after-market supplier to keep their products within acceptable tolerance through no fault of their own. I do prefer having the after-market supplier product be oversized, doesn't matter if it's pistol grips or a long stock, it's easy to take wood off but there's nothing you can do if it comes in too small. I have found that some after-market suppliers will take the time to check sizes before shipping the product if you supply them with the exact measurements of what you need - others just send you whatever they have or whatever the lowest bidder provided.

Most of my grips are made from scratch so I can hand-select the wood to fit the application. If it's getting inlays and carving/checkering, obviously a straight tight grain is best and if they're going to slick-sides you want wood with nice figure and color to it.

The folks at Dixie are great people to deal with, they've been in business for a long time and the reason why speaks for itself.