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stephen426
September 10, 2008, 12:50 AM
We just got a letter from our local PD today. Home invasions are on the rise and they are hitting (suprise, suprise) the more affluent areas. While the typical burgler wants nothing to do with confronting the occupants, these criminals enter homes they know are occupied and hold up the owners at gun point. The police mentioned that they target people who have their garage doors open since it often means the alarm is off. I don't know if it makes sense to set the alarm if you are going to be working in the garage. I don't even think it would make a difference since they could just make you deactivate it.

That got me thinking (it only happens every so often). ;) I'm not sure how many of you have alarms, but most have the capability of having a "panic" code programmed. It won't sound the alarm, but will send a trouble signal to the central station. I'm not sure if they call to confirm, but you could always give them a "panic" passcode. We have been tempted to try it to see what the central station will say (then call back 2 seconds later).

Moral of the story... Don't leave your garage door open even if you are working inside. Set up panic codes for your alarm and panic passwords. Set up a neighborhood watch and call the police to check out suspicious people and vehicles. I guess those who pack while at home aren't so crazy after all.

Times are tough and probably going to get worse before it gets better. Stay safe and keep your eyes and ears open!

JohnKSa
September 10, 2008, 01:15 AM
The police mentioned that they target people who have their garage doors open since it often means the alarm is off.There was one of these in a local suburb. Fortunately they didn't harm the occupants, only stole their van & other posessions.

"The Blue Mound incident was the second home invasion they tried to pull off late Tuesday and early Wednesday, investigators said.
...
In the first incident, the gun-wielding men entered the home on Calico Rock Drive through an open garage door and went to a bedroom where they confronted the 38-year-old homeowner and his wife, Henderson said."On the next stop they ran into resistance. A husband & wife double-teamed them leaving one dead and the other critically injured.
"The Hoehns, both 34, feared that they and their children were about to be killed, so they battled the suspects.
...
He finally managed to get the shotgun away from the larger of the two attackers and turned it on both of them."
http://www.star-telegram.com/229/story/880230.html

First rule of security. If it has a lock, lock it. My parents leave their garage door open most of the time--I've talked to them about it but they're not interested in listening on that particular topic.

#20fan
September 10, 2008, 01:40 AM
I'm always on to my Wife for leaving the garage door open. Hopefully this article will help her see the light! Thanks for posting it.
On a side note, around my area the home invaders are working in packs of 3 or 4. They kick both front and back doors at the same time. I have security doors on both.

JohnKSa
September 10, 2008, 01:48 AM
Another technique is to ring the doorbell and then lure the homeowner out where he is ambushed by an accomplice.

We had a "phantom doorbell ring" the other night about 9:30. I checked things out carefully but didn't see anything. The neighbors down the street indicated that some kids had been playing around so I wrote it off. The interesting thing is that the next day our next door neighbors were out so I asked them if they had heard anything. He responded that he hadn't heard anything and then related a story from 3 years earlier.

At about 1:30AM there was a knock/doorbell ring. He, being of sound mind, retrieved a firearm and then carefully looked out a window that had a view of the porch. He didn't recognize the person at the door, and again, being of sound mind, didn't open the door. He simply waited and watched. After awhile the man on the doorstep turned to leave and at that point his accomplice who had been hiding around the corner joined him as he walked away.

sourdough44
September 10, 2008, 05:29 AM
What about the rouse of asking for directions if someone is home & if not coming in? To me that seems like a plausable way to check things out & if someone is home to act totally innocent. Even when 'asked for the time' on the street I like to look them in the eye for a few seconds 1st.

fm2
September 10, 2008, 06:52 AM
There is some great training coming up that deals with home invasion as a central theme. It's called Full Spectrum Defense and the thread is here:

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310175

I went through the first class offered and it was an outstanding experience.

Tuckahoe
September 10, 2008, 08:03 AM
It sounds like you have a good pro-active police department. Write them back and let them know you are armed and ready to dispatch anyone who attempts to harm you or your family.

Creature
September 10, 2008, 09:59 AM
While shootings are a daily occurrence here in Hampton Roads, I have noticed that home invasions are steadily increasing here as well. From the reports that I have read in the news outlets indicate the elderly or single mothers are being targeted, although anyone can be a victim.

It is why I carry...even at home. At a minimum, I keep something within easy reach.

The latest invasion here in Hampton Roads ended on a happier note though: http://hamptonroads.com/2008/09/suffolk-home-invasion-ends-when-victim-grabs-away-gun

Suffolk home invasion ends when victim grabs away gun
By Jim Washington
The Virginian-Pilot
© September 3, 2008

SUFFOLK

A man managed to grab a gun from one of two men who forced their way into his home Tuesday night, according to police.

The man was at his front door on Bradford Drive at about 10:30 p.m., acccording to police, when two men approached and forced him into the house at gunpoint.

While being held the man grabbed a gun from one of the men, who both then ran out of the house and drove away in a gray or silver van.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call The Crime Line at 1-888-LOCK-U-UP.

KLRANGL
September 10, 2008, 11:10 AM
Hey, a fellow Hampton Roadesian :p

Over in Ocean View, we've had a few police tell us about a rise in burglaries, but I dont know about home invasions (anyplace to find that statistic?). Luckily the local gov is putting lots of money into our area lately, but we still have about 3 project buildings down the street from our house that keeps me on edge... Few weeks back, a man was actually shot and killed about 30ft down the sidewalk from our front door... So I dont even walk outside to my car at night without carrying... And to think my mom freaks out everytime I open carry :rolleyes: I failed to mention that shooting to her for her own sanity (parents live in N. VA)

Keltyke
September 10, 2008, 11:11 AM
Cops are good for taking reports and getting information and descriptions out. They're good if they happen to walk in on a robbery at the 7-11. However, they can't be everywhere at once and can't respond immediately. Where I live, the response time may be 5 minutes or 15, depending on how busy they are and where they are.

Stay alert and stay armed.

KLRANGL
September 10, 2008, 11:36 AM
Keltyke's post reminded me of a good (read sad) story... My friend, on his way home from his girlfriend's house late at night, saw two black clad figures casing a store after hours. He called 911 and got, of all things, put on hold! After 15min he hung up and drove away... And this was in Fairfax County, VA which is one of the highest income counties in the United States by median household income (now 2nd after Loudon I think)...

Keltyke
September 10, 2008, 11:47 AM
He called 911 and got, of all things, put on hold!

I believe it. Some good words and phrases to use to at least get the dispatcher's attention are:

"in progress" As in "Home invasion IN PROGRESS."
"there now" As in "Burglar is THERE NOW."
"with a gun" As in "Man WITH A GUN."
"shots fired" (if they are). As in "Man WITH A GUN. SHOTS FIRED."

I'm sure there are others. 911 gets so many calls that are
not really "911 emergencies" that you gotta wake'em up to what's going down.

Tuckahoe
September 10, 2008, 12:08 PM
Free men should not live in fear. Ted Neugent

Keltyke
September 10, 2008, 01:25 PM
Free men should not live in fear.


Only armed men are truly free, and they live only in the fear their freedom will somehow be diminished.

Creature
September 10, 2008, 01:47 PM
Free men should not live in fear.
Only armed men are truly free, and they live only in the fear their freedom will somehow be diminished.

Whoa. Is that an original thought...or a quote? I cant find it after a quick google.

Excellent words regardless.

Keltyke
September 10, 2008, 04:28 PM
Whoa. Is that an original thought...or a quote?

That's original, but the general thought has probably been expressed in many different ways.

Here's another:
The hand with the olive branch of peace must always be backed up by the hand with the weapon of war.

And one more:
If there are two countries, and one wants a war - there will be war or there will be subjugation.

AZ Med18
September 11, 2008, 01:34 AM
This is why I kinda don't like to answer the door to just a knock. If you need in you have a key(family members) or you call me and I unlock. I hate doors.

Double Naught Spy
September 11, 2008, 05:32 AM
Home invasions are always on the rise, somewhere.

I don't like answering the door either. Probably 80% of the time, it isn't anyone I want to see. Friends and family call first.

mpage
September 11, 2008, 10:37 AM
Wait - conservative radio shows keeps telling us that Crime is Decreasing™

The one thing I wanted to point out about people knocking on your door is this: they may just be casing your place to get an idea as to when you're home. You may want to let them know someone's there even if it's just by talking through the door. If you don't answer, you've just piqued their interest, and if they do break in later that day or week, you might not be home. I'm primarily talking about daytime burglars, though.

Also, these shady-looking door-to-door salesmen can be a problem, from what I understand. My local city requires these people to have permits and encourages people to either ask for their permits, or to call the police.

stephen426
September 11, 2008, 11:33 AM
We were broken into shortly after my wife and I got married. Burglers often check to see if people are home by ringing the doorbell or knocking on the door. We had some remodeling done and some of the alarm wires were cut. The burglers basically had all day to rummage through the house and take whatever they wanted.

Lessons learned...

1. Get an alarm system and USE IT!!! Make sure it is monitored and have battery and cell phone back up incase the lines are cut. It may actually prevent break in (posted alarm signs) and will definately minimize the damage since they will have limited time before the police show up. Set up panic codes and panic passwords!!!

2. Invest in good locks and doors. Flimsy locks can be kicked in or easily picked. Consider bars (that release from the inside) or hurricane resistant glass (since I live in South Florida). The burgler broke into my house by throwing a brick through a sliding glass door.

3. Set up a neighborhood watch and know your neighbors. Look out for each other or else everyone one will mind their own darn business. Make a list of everyone's home and cell phone numbers in case of emergencies. Heck, it may be your alarm that goes off and you might me out of town. It would be great to have a neighbor check on your house.

4. Keep your eyes and ears open for suspicious activity. I hate to sound like a snob, but watch out for vehicles that don't "belong" in your neighborhood, especially if they are driving slowly or making repeated passes. The letter from the police told us to call them if we saw such activity and they would check it out.

5. I'm not sure I want to carry 24/7, but I am really leaning towards kepping guns strategically stashed throughout the house. I don't have any kids yet so curious hands are not an issue. I have heard that secret hiding spots are often the first ones hit and leaving weapons unsecured is an invitation to have them stolen and even possible used against you. Maybe I should just suck it up and carry at home. :(

6. Don't leave doors open (or the car running unoccupied) even if you are jsut running in to retrieve something. Since the letter from the police mentioned that the home invaders are looking for open garages, try not to leave it open (or carry if you are going to be working in the garage).


Please feel free to add to this list.

Keltyke
September 11, 2008, 12:27 PM
"stephen426",

I'll add one thing - get a loud dog.

I have an 80 pound plothound mix and a 65 pound pit/sharpei. Talk about noise if someone comes into the parking area or knocks on the door! Wow!

buzz_knox
September 11, 2008, 12:49 PM
I'll add one thing - get a loud dog.

I have an 80 pound plothound mix and a 65 pound pit/sharpei. Talk about noise if someone comes into the parking area or knocks on the door! Wow!


We have a Pomeranian rescue who weighs about 6 lbs soaking wet. He is, however, exceedingly territorial, will alert on a gnat's fart at 100 meters, and will alarm (i.e. bark so as to wake the dead) should said gnat cross into HIS territory.

Creature
September 11, 2008, 03:57 PM
We have a Pomeranian rescue who weighs about 6 lbs soaking wet. He is, however, exceedingly territorial, will alert on a gnat's fart at 100 meters, and will alarm (i.e. bark so as to wake the dead) should said gnat cross into HIS territory.

Another bonus with that Pomeranian (ala small dog) is that it eats a whole lot less and, thus, is much easier to clean up after...

Small dogs rule.

chinpokojed
September 11, 2008, 04:20 PM
Still waiting on my CC license to show up so no handgun yet, but we've got some decent K9 defense in a 85lbs Doberman and her 75lbs Doberman/Lab brother..

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3096/2823618174_998aeda129.jpg?v=0

We don't get a lot of people knocking on our door ;)

VA9mm
September 11, 2008, 07:57 PM
I have a 60lbs female Pitt/German shepherd mix. If someone knocks on the door she goes ballistic. Good for chasing away people selling stuff as well :).

bclark1
September 11, 2008, 08:22 PM
Good thread, I actually told some family to read it as a reminder to keep their antennae up. My parents and sister are in a very quiet community, but the neighbor across the street was robbed recently (mid-summer?). When one of the residents arrived home, she first noticed their big TV on the floor, with handprints all over it. The police speculated they saw her coming and boogied, leaving the television behind. Again, lucky the burglars weren't confrontational.

Professor once made a joke about castle doctrine turning the north into Texas, shoot 'em all and let God sort 'em out type legislation. The class laughed. I always wondered if folks would think it's so funny if there was an intruder in their apartment, and if they'd want to ask what the intruder's intentions were before acting.

mpage
September 11, 2008, 08:37 PM
6. Don't leave doors open (or the car running unoccupied) even if you are jsut running in to retrieve something. Since the letter from the police mentioned that the home invaders are looking for open garages, try not to leave it open (or carry if you are going to be working in the garage).

If your garage has the older keyhole-style opener on the outside (as opposed to a keypad) they can jimmy that with a screwdriver or something and get right in.

LICCW
September 11, 2008, 09:53 PM
We're lucky. Our neighborhood is one in which people look out for ech other. I've got a veteran LEO right across the street, which is good. We have motion sensor lights outside to light up the house like a Christmas tree. I've got a good alarm system with not only a panic code, but a panic button on a remote. One hit calls the central monitoring station letting them know the s**t has hit the fan, send help ASAP.We have a very alert pit. She lets us know when anyone is so much as walking by the house. We never answer the door. You knock, I look through upstairs window down at you, or through the peep. you hear the dog going nuts, and if I'm not expecting you, I simply say "We don't open the door to anyone, dude." Works foir pollsters, solicitors, Jehovah's witnesses, etc. If all that fails, then I have my G19 which is always at the ready.

dabigguns357
September 11, 2008, 11:30 PM
Ah the age old topic about home invasions.First i use cameras then i use whatever comes next.I am all about carrying everywhere,so i built a belt that is perfect for me,please don't laugh to hard,it's semi-homemade.I bought a $4.00 25 shotgun shell belt from wally-world,undid the stitching,took the left clip off,slid my holster on and stitched the left clip back on like it was before.Yes i know i won't be able to get the holster off,but hey it's meant for here at home.
http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp354/dabigguns357/Picture321.jpg

http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp354/dabigguns357/Picture323.jpg

It really isn't that heavy,and i think of it as practice for hunting season.

Double Naught Spy
September 12, 2008, 06:09 AM
Wait - conservative radio shows keeps telling us that Crime is Decreasing

Many gun people believe concealed carry makes crime go down as well. :barf:

However, from a statistical standpoint, overall crime certainly may be going down and home invasions still increasing. Not all crime type rates rise or fall together. What the crime rate is will mean absolutely nothing to a person who has been a victim.

dandydany
September 14, 2008, 05:55 PM
If one left a radio or TV on and a couple lights on when you leave the house, it would help keep away some of these people. If a woman alone had a recording of a RAGING barking dog, that might help to scare any bad ones away. Some ideas to help, Dan

Stevie-Ray
September 23, 2008, 09:11 PM
We're lucky. Our neighborhood is one in which people look out for ech other. I've got a veteran LEO right across the street, which is good. We have motion sensor lights outside to light up the house like a Christmas tree. I've got a good alarm system with not only a panic code, but a panic button on a remote. One hit calls the central monitoring station letting them know the s**t has hit the fan, send help ASAP.We have a very alert pit. She lets us know when anyone is so much as walking by the house. We never answer the door. You knock, I look through upstairs window down at you, or through the peep. you hear the dog going nuts, and if I'm not expecting you, I simply say "We don't open the door to anyone, dude." Works foir pollsters, solicitors, Jehovah's witnesses, etc. If all that fails, then I have my G19 which is always at the ready.Cheese and rice! Does anybody ever visit or does the drawbridge lower for nobody?:D J/K

Mannlicher
September 25, 2008, 06:39 PM
most home invasions are drug related. Druggie robbing drug dealer, or someone known to have drugs in the house.

I am not worried one bit.

obxned
September 25, 2008, 06:52 PM
Home invasions aren't common in my world - too many people have lots of large dogs and guns.

Threefeathers
September 25, 2008, 07:08 PM
The problem is that they are going up every where. The arrogant rich who tend to be rather liberal in my area are the best victims and are being hit pretty hard.

FBR
September 25, 2008, 10:52 PM
Close to us, double murder home invasion.

http://www.whkp.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1098


Personally, we have 4-7 'tourists' drive down (the long and isolated drive) per year. Most during the day but 5 memorable ones after midnight in the 8 years we have been here.

We have a driveway magnetometer that sets off a chime in the house and the dog is trained to go ballistic upon the sound.

The nighttime visitors get the 2 million candle power welcome from the front window (with the windows cracked for the dog to see and smell).

Everyone so far left without a call to the police, my escalation etc.

FBR

blhseawa
October 10, 2008, 01:43 AM
Our men and women in blue have a very tough job. I don't envy them at all. That said, given that the state, county, city all disavow any responsibility for my or my families safety and the average response time is 45 minutes.

When seconds count, the police are minutes away, but they do bring paper and pen.

Thus, security for my family has, is, and always will be my responsibility.

BillCA
October 10, 2008, 03:51 AM
Many gun people believe concealed carry makes crime go down as well.

However, from a statistical standpoint, overall crime certainly may be going down and home invasions still increasing. Not all crime type rates rise or fall together. What the crime rate is will mean absolutely nothing to a person who has been a victim.

Concealed carry causes some crimes against persons to decrease. But that decrease is often offset by a rise in property crimes - theft, burglary, auto-theft, home invasions, etc. Criminals may be stupid at times, but they're not all dumb.

More than half of theives are opportunists. An open garage door; an unlocked car or tool box; unsecured bicycle, etc. But the others use that open garage to inspect the kinds of goods you have. Some theives actually drive around late at night before garbage pickups. They're looking for new computer boxes, HDTV packaging or other high-ticket item packaging. They then often target that home for a daytime burglary.

Also watch out for "society notices" in the paper. If you're getting married or planning a funeral, make sure no one else puts an item in the paper. Thugs scan such things and can burglarize a home/apt while the wedding or funeral is taking place. If you have to place such a notice, do it afterwards or omit the dates in the paper.

Chui
October 11, 2008, 10:50 PM
Good comments, Bill. When there is a death in the family we have a close family friend who is armed stay at the house with a notorized letter describing that they will be watching the home for the entirety of the day and that they will be known to be armed.

If you have really close friends you can have them stop by when you're out of town as well. I've done this for years and I've also spent a few days and several afternoons/mornings at other friends homes cutting the grass, washing the car and other things to make it noticeable that someone is there when they had to leave for extended periods. I've even had a cookout. The neighbors were initially curious, obviously, but they did not say anything

GetYerShells
October 13, 2008, 03:28 AM
My wife (girlfriend at the time) had a pretty scary incident one night after she was coming home from church. Her mother and father were both still at the church building helping with the cleaning up. My wife pulls up at her house on the curb of the road as she normally does. Her parents usually park their cars in the driveway. She goes up and unlocks the front door and walks in. Keep in mind now that the way their house is build there is a small entery way which connects to the dining room, living room, and kitchen. These three areas are all connected. From one end of the living room you can look across the space to the back door of the house.

So she opens the door, walks around the corner of the breezway and see's a silouette of a man in their house near the back door. The outside motion detector light had been triggered and she was now looking at the silouette of the person who triggered it...inside the house. She had a box in her hands, she immediatley dropped the box and ran to their neighbors house and called the police. When the police arrived on scene the perp had fled the scene, and the back door was still open. Nothing in the house had been tampered with or disturbed. What they believe happened was that she (my wife) walked in the door seconds after the intruder broke in. He didn't even have time to leave a shoeprint on the carpet when he got caught.

Since then, her parents installed a house alarm with panic mode and all that. In the past 2 years the northwest area of San Antonio that we live in has really started to turn south. Since that night I have trained my wife in clearing our home with my Mossberg 500 persuader. I've also trained her in using a Surefire in conjunction with a pistol. She keeps my SIG in a holster under the bed when I am gone and the 12 guage in the corner next to the bed.

I see on the news about every other week of someone getting their house broken into or their car stolen, or worse. I also urged my mother and father-in-law to invest in a good home defense pistol. My wifes dad now carry's a Glock 30 .45 ACP. The moral here is you can never be too safe when it comes to your home, your family, and your valuables. Good equipment will never substitute for vigillance, instincts, and training.

Double Naught Spy
October 13, 2008, 06:52 AM
The problem is that they are going up every where.

No. They are not.

ilbob
October 13, 2008, 09:30 AM
At least your PD admits there is a problem and tries to warn people about it. many places when these kind of thing start happening they try to cover it up for some reason, as if that will somehow make it better.

mpage
October 14, 2008, 06:03 PM
The arrogant rich who tend to be rather liberal in my area are the best victims and are being hit pretty hard.

This is exactly what has been happening in my area, and whenever the crook is caught, another one generally takes his place. I think the word is out that these people are relatively defenseless; indeed, reading their remarks on local blogs, I would agree.

subdermal
October 14, 2008, 10:50 PM
Quote:

" Some theives actually drive around late at night before garbage pickups. They're looking for new computer boxes, HDTV packaging or other high-ticket item packaging. They then often target that home for a daytime burglary. "

This is one of the first rules of city living, but should be practiced no matter where you live. I used to live in a city, but now reside in the quieter suburbs, and I see this all the time. Destroy the boxes, fold them inside out and bag them, better yet, take them to a recycling dumpster AWAY from your house. Don't advertise your new purchase to the world, and any potential thieves.
Another thing to add is to NOT have your name on your mailbox or house. It makes it much easier for a smart thief to call information and get your phone number, thereby being able to call the house and see if anyone/who is home....

Daugherty16
October 15, 2008, 12:59 PM
I read one post one time where the author said, "If i'm dressed, i'm carrying". And i thought it rather extreme at the time. Then we had a gruesome home invasion only three towns over, where the wife and two daughters were roasted alive in their home by two recently released felons who torched the place to conceal their crime. If only the wife had carried a little piece in her pocket book - how different might that story have ended?

So i got my CCW. I explained it to my wife like this: I'm older now, and less able to physically defend myself (not much less, but it's continual slide down that path...), and times have changed so that weapons are often carried by bad guys, not just sometimes, so i needed an equalizer; and home invasions are on the rise and we live in a nice rich little town where the perception is of fat, rich liberals for residents. and nothing scares me in this world more than the idea of BG having their way with my beautiful wife or kids and being unable to do anything about it. at least carrying, i have an answer. It's only one answer, and may not be enough, but it's a start until i can grab the Mossberg.

This year alone, in my little town there have been 1 armed robbery at a jewlelry store and 2 home invasions. If the world is going nuts, then i'm going armed.

M1911
October 15, 2008, 02:08 PM
Another technique is to ring the doorbell and then lure the homeowner out where he is ambushed by an accomplice.If I don't know the person, I don't open the door. The deadbolt is always thrown. I can tell "We're not interested" without opening the door and while holding a 1911 behind my back.

dabigguns357
October 15, 2008, 07:28 PM
As i have said before i do carry at all times and every where.But if you want to feel safer at home then get you a nanny cam,pin hole camera.they range from 30.00 dollars to 80.00.So all you have to do is flip your bedroom tv or livingroom tv over to video to see who in on your porch.I keep my monitor up and on record 24/7.I turn my cam to face the front door to see everyone from the knees up.

ice9_us
October 15, 2008, 09:31 PM
scare the hell out of me why don't ya..

-------------------------------
We had a "phantom doorbell ring" the other night about 9:30. I checked things out carefully but didn't see anything. The neighbors down the street indicated that some kids had been playing around so I wrote it off. The interesting thing is that the next day our next door neighbors were out so I asked them if they had heard anything. He responded that he hadn't heard anything and then related a story from 3 years earlier.

At about 1:30AM there was a knock/doorbell ring. He, being of sound mind, retrieved a firearm and then carefully looked out a window that had a view of the porch. He didn't recognize the person at the door, and again, being of sound mind, didn't open the door. He simply waited and watched. After awhile the man on the doorstep turned to leave and at that point his accomplice who had been hiding around the corner joined him as he walked away.
--------------------------------------

this is the main reason i bought a gun.. To much of this is going on..
I have spoken with my neighbors who are a bit chicken.. I told them, trying to make plans, if i call em, there is a problem.. Much like the issue above... I wanted them to know where My family would be so they could send led my way at the jerks knocking on my door.. if i wasn't in any position to move.....
I will be in X location at the time of my 1:30 AM phone call.. just start unloading... we will be out of the way..
:cool:

I will take the silence that they are gone



I have a pt140 now.. I was/am looking at the JUGDE now...
my wife saw me checking out this little puppy..

http://usautoweapons.com/pgs/ShowItem?ID=634


I like sending led in directions though walls not having to worry about much, just staying out of the way....
I am in 2 story house.. so any aim will be down and not across the street.. My wife thinks I am nuts to be planning stuff like this out... But reading this.. makes it more of a reality than Most would like to accept..
I am hearing stories like this almost weekly now...

KLRANGL
October 15, 2008, 10:23 PM
I know its fiction, but I think the Death Wish movies with Charles Bronson should be required viewing by all... Watched 1 and 2 over the weekend and I realized if anything like that happened in front of me to people I care about, I could never live with myself...

Bad guys exist... no reason not to be prepared

glockman19
October 16, 2008, 11:44 AM
When Home I keep the "chime" function on. If a door or window contact is broken it chimes.

Creature
October 16, 2008, 12:05 PM
I have spoken with my neighbors who are a bit chicken.. I told them, trying to make plans, if i call em, there is a problem.. Much like the issue above... I wanted them to know where My family would be so they could send led my way at the jerks knocking on my door.. if i wasn't in any position to move.....
I will be in X location at the time of my 1:30 AM phone call.. just start unloading... we will be out of the way..


I will take the silence that they are gone


I like sending led in directions though walls not having to worry about much, just staying out of the way....
I am in 2 story house.. so any aim will be down and not across the street.. My wife thinks I am nuts to be planning stuff like this out... But reading this.. makes it more of a reality than Most would like to accept..
I am hearing stories like this almost weekly now...

Huh? ...surely you cant be serious. I must be misunderstanding what you are trying to get across by these two statements. Certainly you are joking.

This isnt a game. You and your neighbors are responsible for every single shot and where it winds up.

Caeser2001
October 18, 2008, 09:37 AM
I don't like answering the door either. Probably 80% of the time, it isn't anyone I want to see. Friends and family call first.

or just walk in.

kolob10
October 18, 2008, 09:58 AM
A couple years ago, we left the house for church - same time every week. My youngest son (19 years old) remained behind due to the flu. My wife didn't lock the door when she left since we live in the boonies and my son was home About fifteen minutes after we left, My son was awaken (sleeping upstairs in the family room - balcony overlooking the living area) by someone coming through the front door. As he quietly peered over the balcony from a discreet location, he saw the guy walking through the living room area. There was the house 12 gauge 870 nearby so he laid the gun over the railing and racked one in the chamber. The guy looked up and stopped. My son asked if he could help him. The guy turned and ran out of the house in a flash. My son slowly proceede downstairs making sure no one else was in the house. as he looked out the front door a pickup truck with the tailgate down was leaving our drive in a rather speedy fashion. My son later said the only thing he thought about at the time was the mess this guys bodily fluids would make on his mothers piano (guy stopped in front of the piana) should he need to defend himself.

Later, while talking to a neighbor down the road, he told of a rash of breakins
nearby. I hope this encounter ended this guys career.

garryc
October 18, 2008, 10:26 AM
I had an attempted break in once. And I called 911, but first I called 1-9-1-1.

Seriously though, I've been a C/O for 16 years and I know how these guys think. They seek defenseless people. When a few of them get shot up then the rest decide it's not worth the gamble.

Basically the criminal makes the same calculation as a business man or a gambler, a cost/risk/benefit analysis. So they figure they might get caught, what are those odds? Then even if they get caught they only might get prosecuted, What's that risk? They might get prison time, been there with their dudes and it ain't so bad. Those are acceptable odds often. Then you through in " I might die here, today and right now, that's a deal breaker for most. It throws their cost/risk/benefit analysis way to one side.

Now when they are intoxicated they take chances that would otherwise be avoided. Why do you think they want you drunk in Vegas?

Caeser2001
October 18, 2008, 10:52 AM
We don't get a lot of people knocking on our door

sometimes I the mail only makes it to the front of the driveway.

Caeser2001
October 18, 2008, 10:57 AM
They seek defenseless people

it's a shame that the law would be on the criminals side when coming to the aid of an elderly neighbor when seconds count and the cops are minutes away:mad:. I know from previous experience in the above situation when the cop asked why I didn't stay in my home:mad:

Langenator
October 18, 2008, 04:32 PM
They seek defenseless people

Something to think about for any service members out there...nothing screams your wife is home alone like one of those "Half My Heart Is In Iraq/Afghanistan" stickers.

Blue stars say the same thing, just not quite as loud.

PSA courtesy of the Ft Bragg ParaGlide newspaper and Ft Bragg Provost Marshall's office.

I was TDY a few hours from home three years ago, and my wife, pregnant with #2 at the time, was home with our then 18 month old son. It was getting close to the due date, and she started having some problems, so my CO sent me home. After putting my son to bed that night, I went out to retrieve my rifle from the car (there was a rifle range at the TDY location), still wearing my carry piece (which was no longer concealed since I was home.)

While I was getting the rifle out of the trunk, I noticed an older Ford Ranger pickup parked across and up the street a little ways, with two people inside. As I pulled the rifle out and headed back inside, the truck started up, turned on the lights, and drove away.

Pretty sure I deterred something bad.

Rmart30
October 18, 2008, 09:09 PM
Not trying to take the thread too far off course but.... How many of you know how well your doors are secured?

I checked mine a while back and all the hinges and striker plates were secured with 1/2" screws...:eek:
I replaced them all withen short order with 3" decking screws.
I also added a 1/8"x2"x2' piece of flat bar (lowes) to the striker side of the door jamb.
That takes up some of the gap between your door and the frame. Mine had a gap of almost 1/2" and left less than 1/4" of deadbolt catching its plate.
The longer flatbar also strengthens it by putting the load over a wider area... 12 3" screws holding it rather than only 4 on the original plates.

heyduke
October 19, 2008, 06:33 AM
Honestly guys, after reading some of these posts, I'm glad I live where I do, out in the "country".

My cars are out in front of the house, never locked, usually with my wallet in one of them. Can leave the house to go into town and forget to lock the house doors and never a problem. I know most of my neighbors, and when we moved here, we're invited to the "family" summer picnic next door (the road I live on is named after the family up the hill from us). Neghbor let me use his ZTR mower when he saw taking 7 days to cut the front lawn with a push mower, and in return, I let him use my mower (after I finally bought one) after his broke down. Heck, I even hike to my bow stand in the morning.

That said, up in the largest town in the county (population 3k) the law recently caught the perps of a "crime ring" where they were breaking in and stealing from the local businesses.

Guess my point is that people being people, you will always have people who are willing to break the law and perhaps do harms to others to gain in their own agenda. That's a fact and we'll always have people like that.

However, like I said before, I am happy with my choice for my home and think I would go nutz if I had to live in a real city (before you go thinking me a real big hick, I use to work in D.C and some other major metropolitan areas on the east coast).

Chui
October 19, 2008, 07:14 AM
You know this already but I thought it pertinent, anyway.

Being rural nowadays doesn't mean you won't have home invasions BUT you are much less likely to have to face an armed, riotous mob when the power goes out and the food trucks are no longer carrying anything edible... :D