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View Full Version : Tikka T3 lite or Remington model 700 SPS


ltmcleoed
August 26, 2008, 01:54 PM
Either way the rifle will be in stainless and synthetic. Thanks for all your input

ringworm
August 26, 2008, 02:04 PM
hard to beat the cold hammer forged barrels. I dont care for the drop magazine on the tikka and i am less exited about the stock but the trigger is better than the older remington. the newer X trigger is better. accuracy goes towards the tikka if you can realize it in a hunting situation or not, im unsure.

billindenver
August 26, 2008, 03:53 PM
Tikka, all day every day...twice on sundays

davlandrum
August 26, 2008, 04:05 PM
Which ever feels best to you.

I have an SPS in -06 beaded stainless and synthetic and love it. Shoots better than I do, makes critters into dinners. Great factory recoil pad.

Wayfarin'Stranger
August 26, 2008, 06:05 PM
Which stock fits you better?

hoghunting
August 26, 2008, 11:41 PM
I have both and I'll pick the Tikka every time.

Blackops_2
August 27, 2008, 12:01 AM
Tikka t3, will shoot better and has a better stock.

butta9999
August 27, 2008, 01:41 AM
My uncle has a tikka t3 light in .270. The rifle shoots MOA at 100yds and i a great rifle to carry around. You will see a pic of him and a boar taken on our last hunt a few days ago, in the hunt forums.

davlandrum
August 27, 2008, 09:59 AM
Tikka t3, will shoot better and has a better stock.

OK, here we go.

"Better" accuracy in a hunting rifle past a certain point is a non-issue. My Rem will shoot sub-MOA and I am sure the Tikka will as well.

I still stick by which ever one feels better to you.

thinkingman
August 27, 2008, 12:58 PM
you are MUCH MORE LIKELY to get a shooter out of a Tikka box than a green one.
Remington 700 is for a hobbyist, Tikka is for someone that wants it done right the first time.

Inspector3711
August 27, 2008, 01:56 PM
Remington 700 is for a hobbyist, Tikka is for someone that wants it done right the first time.

Wow... I don't think i would go that far. I'm certain Remington makes some of the finest and most accurate factory rifles in the world. I'm also pretty sure many "professionals" use Remington rifles. I know Tikka has a great reputation but I don't think that qualifies Remington as a "hobbyist" product.

Just my opinion.

davlandrum
August 27, 2008, 02:07 PM
you are MUCH MORE LIKELY to get a shooter out of a Tikka box than a green one.
Remington 700 is for a hobbyist, Tikka is for someone that wants it done right the first time.

1) This is based on what? your opinion?
2) If by "hobbyist" you are indicating that you have to do a lot of work to a Rem right out of the box, in my experience that is not true. My rifle is as stock as the day I got it.

On the other hand, I am a hobbyist, in that I enjoy shooting and hunting. So I guess I made the right choice for me.


Must....stop....getting....sucked...in....by....these....threads:rolleyes:

bluedog
August 27, 2008, 02:15 PM
I like both! But....I used to own all Rem 700 rifles....my last three rifles replaced Rem 700s and were all Tikka T3 stainless lites....the T3 is a great rifle for the money!

Wildalaska
August 27, 2008, 02:25 PM
Remington, better quality, better design....

And if you ever have to get parts or have it serviced, if you have a Tikka, you are SOL. Beretta service/parts are the worst in the industry, they make Taurus and Bersa look good

WildfromexperienceAlaska ™

HOGGHEAD
August 27, 2008, 02:39 PM
WA summed it up pretty well.

I have handled and shot Tikka's. They do shoot well. But I just can not get over the fact that the rifle feels like one of the plastic rifles I played with when i was a kid. I will probably get flamed for saying that . But I have friends who have Tikkas. And when they show their rifle to someone, the comment is always "Plastic on a deer rifle". "Not for me". I have heard this several times. I have never heard a person make that comment about a Remington.

I do not blame people for defending their Tikka's if they like them. But they should not knock another product because "They have a Tikka". They should knock the product if it is the truth. And personally I have not seen alot of Remington bashers present many facts-they just repeat what they have heard.

Buy the rifle you like. But if you are looking for the truth then that is a different story. And as I posted on another Tikka T3 post. If you do not like your Remington you can always trade it for a Tikka. That is called trading down. Tom.

Spade Cooley
August 27, 2008, 03:38 PM
I would rather have a sister working in a whore house than a brother owning a Tikka.

thinkingman
August 27, 2008, 05:07 PM
Leupold, Remington, Chevy,.....where does it end?
Making a statement that Rem makes some of the best rifles in the world is like saying Chevy makes some of the best race cars in the world.
Remington designed a lowcost, easily machined action that is easy for a gunsmith to put on a lathe and true, which needs to be done too often for my tastes.
'Professionals' do not shoot out-of-the-box Remingtons.
Compare Tikka trigger out of the box to a Rem 700 SPS.
Compare the smoothness of the actions out of the box.
There are many stories about Rem barrels bored out of center, rough actions that need lapping, triggers set for lawyer-level pull...scope mounts tapped out of center....the list goes on.
I wanted a Rem 700 Mountain Rifle in the worst way and made the mistake of picking up a Tikka in the shop before I bought it.
There was no comparison.
My fondest memories as a kid involved a green box.
Not what I would buy my son today.
http://www.go2gbo.com/forums/index.php/topic,78519.0.html

billindenver
August 27, 2008, 06:36 PM
I have handled and shot Tikka's. They do shoot well. But I just can not get over the fact that the rifle feels like one of the plastic rifles I played with when i was a kid. I will probably get flamed for saying that . But I have friends who have Tikkas. And when they show their rifle to someone, the comment is always "Plastic on a deer rifle". "Not for me". I have heard this several times. I have never heard a person make that comment about a Remington.

I do not blame people for defending their Tikka's if they like them. But they should not knock another product because "They have a Tikka". They should knock the product if it is the truth. And personally I have not seen alot of Remington bashers present many facts-they just repeat what they have heard.

Buy the rifle you like. But if you are looking for the truth then that is a different story. And as I posted on another Tikka T3 post. If you do not like your Remington you can always trade it for a Tikka. That is called trading down. Tom.


I didn't see much in the way of bashing in here from Tikka owners. I did see several who own both and stated they prefer the Tikka and one who had 3 remingtons that are now tikkas. In fact, any bashing I've seen has been from the Remmy camp, though I'm not at all sure why. What I have not seen is anyone who owns a tikka and a remington who prefers the remington. I wonder why that is?

On the plastic issue, where you say your friends say no plastic on a deer rifle for them and you have never heard that comment made about a remington...do you believe that Tikka does not make wood clad rifles or do you believe that Remington does not make synthetics? Either way, I think you should do some research. If you don't like plastic...that's cool. But if you were elk hunting in colorado..I would bet you would change your mind. In any event, you can choose plastic or wood in either rifle....

Horseman
August 27, 2008, 06:38 PM
Every custom benchrest action is an improved version of a 700. Some will even interchange stocks, and almost all will use the same trigger. You can get the finest trigger in the world for a 700(Jewell). You wont get a Tikka much lower than 2 lbs. The 700 has no plastic parts other than a possible synthetic stock. I consider it amatuerish to compare how smooth bolts are. Certain designs will always be different and this is not necessarily a sign of quality. For example a claw controlled action which is more expensive to produce will usually be less smooth compared to a push-feed.

More professionals rely on the 700 than any other. You can rest assured the soldiers in the sandbox aren't *&^%ing around with plastic magazines and triggerguards.

That said the T3 is amazingly accurate and I like to think of them as a $100 rifle with a $300 barrel. Nobody can say Tikkas don't shoot good. However the last 2 700's I bought have produced groups well under 1/2" with A-Max handloads on a regular basis.

Inspector3711
August 28, 2008, 11:16 AM
Chevy does indeed make some of the best race cars in the world.

Swamper
August 28, 2008, 11:57 AM
They are both great rifles. And, as other have pointed out, your choice really should be based on your individual ergonomics. I have a SPS in 7mm-08. Two seasons ago, I was 6 for 6 on whitetail (game biologist supervised cull hunt for those arm chair flamers). That being said, I often think a Tiikka would be a great addition. But, so would a stainless Featherweight, a custom shop Model Seven..., well, you get the idea.

But, how many deer rifles do you need if you are great with the one you have?

I pray to never definitively answer this question.

Swamper

sholling
August 28, 2008, 12:22 PM
I see that faithful have turned this into yet another religious straw-grasping nit-picking contest. :D

I've owned and loved a 700BDL. She was a beauty that's for sure and I wish I still had her. But I'm mystified what hand built $3000+ bench rest or sniping rifles have to do with comparing out of the box rifles. Do you really believe that the Chevy Monte Carlo that you brought home from the dealer is the exact same car that is run on NASCAR? What does one have to do with the other other than a name plate? Do you honestly believe that there is anything left absolutely bone bare stock those megabuck customs? If there is I'd ask for my money back! It's the old "If I put $500,000 into my Monte Carlo it will beat your stock Shelby Mustang so mine is better" argument.

Remington 700s are darn fine rifles, but on average a bone bare stock 700 isn't going to out perform a bone bare stock Tikka. On the contrary in my opinion having owned both a bone bare stock Tikka T3 is on average going to slightly out perform a bone bare stock Remington 700 at an equal price point. Will it make the slightest difference to the critter at the receiving end? Probably not.

/reality check

Alleykat
August 28, 2008, 03:29 PM
sholling: Good post; however, I think you'll find that trying to dialogue logically with folks who are incapable of logical cogitating is an exercise in futility! ;)

Wildalaska
August 28, 2008, 03:52 PM
Remington 700s are darn fine rifles, but on average a bone bare stock 700 isn't going to out perform a bone bare stock Tikka. On the contrary in my opinion having owned both a bone bare stock Tikka T3 is on average going to slightly out perform a bone bare stock Remington 700 at an equal price point. Will it make the slightest difference to the critter at the receiving end? Probably not.

But add the notoriously poor service at Tikka and you get?

Remington wins

WildendofdiscussionAlaska ™

jmr40
August 28, 2008, 04:01 PM
Over the years I have bought, sold and traded around and have owned a lot of different rifles. Probably 25-30 Remingtons and never had a problem with them. Most were pretty accurate with a few that were unacceptable. I bought my first Tikka 4 years ago and have not hunted with a Remington since. I still have my old 700 that I bought in high school 35 years ago and it is equal in accuracy to my Tikka, but the Tikka beats every other Remington I have ever owned.

The main selling point for me is the light weight of the Tikka. The Remington SPS will be about 1 1/2 lbs heavier. If you do not go overboard with a scope the Tikka will be 1/2-3/4 lb lighter scoped than a Remington with no scope. This may not be important to everyone but it suits my style of hunting.

Will the Tikka still be working 25 years from now like an old Remington? Who knows and only time will tell. For me I will enjoy using a lighter, more accurate rifle for now.

sholling
August 28, 2008, 04:26 PM
But add the notoriously poor service at Tikka and you get?I'll have to take your word for it Ken. I'm 52 and I've never had to send any rifle in for repair. I did have a magazine issue but Beretta is offering a free replacement (< 1 minute on hold) as soon as I get around to sending it in. So what common failures have you seen in Tikkas and Remingtons that required a return to depot? I'm just curious.

JohnCrighton
August 28, 2008, 07:25 PM
Tikka, hands down. I have had many, took one to Africa with me to hunt (M695 .30-06) and you just can't beat the accuracy, reliability, bolt smoothness, and excellent trigger of the rifle.

I have a T3 as well in .223 that is nothing short of amazing. All my bolt action rifles will always be Tikkas.

BTW - when I was in Namibia, both my PH (Professional Hunter) and his father (a very well-respected PH himself), both of whom have had YEARS of experience hunting and shooting, and have each taken thousands of animals, both offered to buy my Tikka, calling it one of the finest shooting and performing rifles they have ever held. Take that for what it is worth (not much to some, a lot to others).

And I've used it pretty hard in some tough conditions and have never had any problems.

Wildalaska
August 28, 2008, 07:32 PM
I did have a magazine issue but Beretta is offering a free replacement (< 1 minute on hold) as soon as I get around to sending it in.

Wanna work for me? Shortest hold I ever had was 20 minutes.:D

So what common failures have you seen in Tikkas and Remingtons that required a return to depot? I'm just curious.

Remington? Probably biggest is failure to extract....but volume of those is low compared to number of guns out there and we service them.

Tikka? Broken parts, lost magazines or loose magazines, broken stocks...try and get a part from those guys.

WildtheystinkAlaska ™

sholling
August 28, 2008, 09:06 PM
lost magazines You've hit the only Tikka Weakness that I've found. Spare magazines are rare as hen's teeth. Service hasn't been an issue I've called twice and talked to a human in less than I minute both times. Helpfulness was so-so but not horrible. The thing with Tikka magazines is jump on them when they come up. I have one spare for my 300WM and 3 spare five rounders for my 223 all from Cheaper Than Dirt.

blurry6
August 28, 2008, 10:47 PM
I've owned both and have to say that 'it depends' whether or not you're going to use it 'as is' for the foreseable future or if you plan on putting some time and money into tinkering, futzing with, and upgrading your new rifle.

If I were going to buy a rifle with the idea of getting the best shooter straight out of the box that doesn't need much in the way of upgrades as I don't have the money to do much more than buy the rifle and my scope,... I'd DEFINATELY go with a Tikka. As I mentioned in another post

(http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=307672)

my little Tikka T3 Tactical is a great, handy little rifle and shoots like a dream for the cost! As a Tikka owner, I gravitate toward, and attract, other Tikka owners at the range and I've NEVER had any one of them say nothing but great things about their rifles - face it, Tikka's are really great shooters! Personally, I'm not a fan of the stocks, but at this point I couldn't care less as they 'just shoot'! Sure, others will knock the 'plastic mags', but not because they show evidence of an inordinate amount of breaking,...they're just different.

Now, if I were planning on taking a stock rifle and upgrading it into an ultra-accurate sniper rifle, or even long range hunting rifle, i.e. new stock, barrel, bedding, trued action, etc. - something that is easy to get 'accessories' for and upgrade, then I wouldn't hesitate to get a Remington Model 700 over any other rifle. As another poster mentioned, Rem700's are the backbone of the serious shooting crowd, but only after serious money and time is invested in making them that way. On the flip side, if you're into spending money for a highend rifle, you might consider also looking into Tikka's parent company; Sako. If you're looking for a high-end shooter you can't do much worse than Sako's TRG line of rifles,... and the cost will be as much or less than most of the custom Rem700's :)

In either case, both are good rifles, but for different reasons. Personally, I consider my Tikka to be a really good rifle,... not a GREAT rifle,... but really good and I haven't done a thing to it other than put on a quality optic and dial in a tack-driving handload. As for my Rem700? It was a 'good' rifle when I bought it,... not really good, but good. I've since had a new stock, bedding, and trigger put on it to get it to be a 'really good' rifle,... but it's still not great.

Both my Tikka and my Rem700 are close to eachother now (Tikka holding an edge), but to date, I know that I've spent more on bringing my Rem700 up to par and if I just sink even MORE $$$ into the Rem700,... it could be a great rifle,... it's just a matter of investment. Just a thought :)

Ryan

Inspector3711
August 30, 2008, 01:35 PM
My only point was that to discount Remington as a hobbyist rifle is a little extreme. The Remingtons I own as well as the numerous ones that my father owns all shoot well under 1" 5 shot 100 yard groups. My .223 shoots sub .75" and the .22-250 Sendero I'm buying from dad will shoot .50". I'm quite certain this would allow any "professional" to take even small varmints at any relevant distance just as well as a Tikka or even a $4000 custom. I was not knocking Tikka or any other brand. No, I don't believe Remington makes the absolute best rifle. That said, in my experience, the ones I have will shoot just as well as any other factory rifle (without modifications).

Chevrolet makes a stock corvette that is raced professionally in stock condition. In some cases the horsepower has to be reduced.

Horseman
August 31, 2008, 09:31 PM
Inspector 3711,

My experience with Remington accuracy has been the same as yours with BONE STOCK 700's. I know that's hard for some to believe but it's true. It seems like it's becoming a rite of passage for some to belittle 700's to prove their "knowledge" about rifle accuracy.

Although there are many brands capable of excellent accuracythese days, this does not make 700's any less accurate than they've always been.

lewwetzel
September 1, 2008, 11:09 AM
Amen, Horseman. I'd seriously look for a good deal on a Rem. LVSF (up to .243; no sure what cal. were talking about) and compare to a Tikka lite. I've got one and also a Varmint SPS, both shoot great with no problems. The SPS is a Cabela's special with a stainless barrel.
Also, I'd think about dealer availability/service and country of origin. We need to keep as many $ in th U.S. as possible. And, I'd bet the Rem. will have a greater resale value, too.

Inspector3711
September 1, 2008, 07:20 PM
The .223 I mentioned above is a Rem 700 LVSF. If you are looking for a bench gun it won't be ideal but if you are looking for a light, accurate rifle to carry, at 6.5 lbs it'll do the job as well as any. Mine has the old trigger design which is it's one downfall. There is some creep I can't seem to adjust out but I did manage to turn the pull down to 3lbs. I may replace the trigger someday but the rest of the rifle is just right!

Chui
September 1, 2008, 08:11 PM
Try the new Remington XCR. Phenomenal piece of equipment.

drmiller100
September 1, 2008, 11:41 PM
hard to spend money on a remington and make it shoot worse.

hard to spend money on a tikka.





easy to spend a LOT of money on a remington to make it shoot like a tikka out of the box.


If you want to spend energy, time, and money to build a custom rifle with just the right recipe for just the right combo, the remington is better for you.

if you just want the rifle to shoot where it is pointed with whatever loads you happen to have bought that day, try the Tikka.

Inspector3711
September 2, 2008, 12:38 AM
hard to spend money on a remington and make it shoot worse.

hard to spend money on a tikka.

I've read complaints that the Tikkas do have occasional parts breakage. I guess it's hard to spend money on them because it's hard to get parts...:p

As stated above, I have a Remington .22-250 in stock form that will hold 1/2" 5 shot groups. That surely is as tight as a Tikka. I'm sure ALL Tikkas shoot SUB .500" groups with no mods though.

sholling
September 2, 2008, 02:55 AM
I've read complaints that the Tikkas do have occasional parts breakage.Can you document this without going back 7-8 years? Links please. Can you document that fewer Remingtons have broken? Links please.

The Remington 700 fine rifles but let's not get carried away with trashing because another brand shoots as well or better for less money. It sounds largely like Glockaphile trash talk. The reality is that it's hard to go wrong with a Tikka T3 or a Remington 700.

Horseman
September 2, 2008, 08:14 AM
I've read complaints that the Tikkas do have occasional parts breakage.

Can you document this without going back 7-8 years?

Anyone who was reading gun forums in 2003-2006 can tell you all the stories they read with pictures about stainless Tikka's blowing into tiny pieces upon firing. Use the search function on this forum and it's sister forum and that will be my "provided documentation". The bad part about the whole deal is how Beretta tried to keep it hush hush. They did not send out letters to owners of guns affected. They waited for the consumer to call and ask them if their gun was going to blow up. This seems irresponsible to me with an issue of safety.

I hope you find the thread that was started last year about the guy who was shooting 12 benches down from a Tikka. All of the sudden a piece of stainless landed on his bench that said "Made in Finland". He looked down the firing line and saw people gathered around what was left of a stainless T3.

billindenver
September 2, 2008, 09:02 AM
There was one bad batch of stainless barrels, I doubt you can find 5 posts on the entire internet from people whose rifle failed. Further, I bet I can find more than 5 posts about Remingtons that have failed. Further still, how many of those failed Tikkas were reloaders who were working up loads...care to guess?

Point being, people in glass houses, rocks etc. No manufacturer of firearms has put out a product for years without the occasional problem. Tikka, despite your assurances, did deal with the problem as well as any firearm manufacturer. When a reloader has a barrel blow up...you don't exactly hit the panic button as a firearm manufacturer. When it happened again in a factory ammo use...then they took action. Surf on over to the reloader section and read for a while...plenty of guys going over the limits out there. More often than not the primer or case shows the overpressure.....but if the chamber is tight....you may not see the signs as early as you like.

In any event, old story, fixed half a decade ago. If that is your only beef with Tikka, you really are stretching. I am still waiting to read of any Remington and Tikka owner who prefers the Remington. I've seen a half dozen go the other way in the last week in here. There seem to be plenty of Remingtons sitting in safes while the Tikka they share the safe with is out playing. Why is that?

Horseman
September 2, 2008, 10:33 AM
Hey Bill, calm down.

I was simply showing an instance in which the mighty Tikka had a fault. I realize EVERY brand has faults. But the post before mine was challenging the idea that Tikka ever had problems. I am simply saying......YES they did.

I actually think Tikka's offer a lot for the money. But I will not take a bath in Tikka kool aid and be a sunshine pumper. EVERYTHING has trade offs. What you love about Tikka's someone else may not. What others love about Remington's someone else may not. I compete with Remingtons in Varmint class benchrest as do many others at the match's I attend. In the Hunter class benchrest where factory sporter weight barrels are required there are PLENTY of Tikka's and Remingtons to support your beliefs. There's a lot to like about Tikka's but they're not perfect.

sholling
September 2, 2008, 01:14 PM
I was simply showing an instance in which the mighty Tikka had a fault. I realize EVERY brand has faults. But the post before mine was challenging the idea that Tikka ever had problems.No you were going for a gold medal in nit-picking. Congrats you got it. You dredged up an isolated long ago fixed issue in a single shipment of stainless (only) barrels waaaaaaaaaaay back when. That's why I put a time frame on my challenge to the poster to find any recent relevant issue. You still haven't. I called bull on a statement that Tikkas are breaking left and right - they aren't. Sure it's possible to break anything with a bit of creativity but since I've lived 52 years without ever breaking a rifle I don't think it's a huge problem. Now let's get back to the reality that both are fine rifles.

Horseman
September 2, 2008, 03:46 PM
Scholling
One of the T3's used in hunter class at my club are missing the plastic bolt shroud. I asked the shooter at the last match what happened. He said he whacked it against something 2 years ago and it shattered. He's been using it like that at matches for years. I don't think he was 52 years old either. Hard to believe isn't it?

Don't get me wrong I actually like Tikka's. But I refuse to claim something is perfect just because I like it. I have found something I don't like about any brand of rifle I own. It doesn't mean I don't like them. I'm just realistic. Everything about how rifles are designed is a trade off. It's hard to get it perfect IMO. I suppose you'd call it nit picking. Perhaps some of us have higher standards than others.

Wildalaska already stated his opinion on this subject. He works at a gunshop and sees a fair cross section of both brands, yet you don't accept fact for .....well.........fact.

sholling
September 2, 2008, 05:10 PM
Wildalaska already stated his opinion on this subject. He works at a gunshop and sees a fair cross section of both brands, yet you don't accept fact for .....well.........fact.Wildalaska is one of the few gunshop denizens that I don't consider to be full of crap. It's just not a career that attracts a lot of PhDs or MENSA candidates. Now if memory serves his only complaint was he had a hard time finding replacement magazines for customers that forgot or lost theirs and I agreed with him. No rifle is perfect but the action is smoother and the trigger better than the out of the box 700s that I've handled. Massaged is a different animal. I'll take your word if you tell me that the 700s now come with a crisp trigger adjustable to 2lbs right out of the box. I honestly don't know. It's been several years since I've had one. I honestly like the 700 (but hate the 710 and 770) and would happily own one as I've stated before. But my only complaint with Tikka is that they don't offer the T3 in a short action. When I went looking for a short and handy 20" .308 I bought a Howa youth to save 5". I'm in the process of saving for a 24" Savage 10FP in 308. I'm choosing it over a T3 Super Varmint in 308 strictly for the easily replaceable barrel system. I'm not a brand bigot, I just get tired of people slinging crap because their favored brand isn't winning a forum popularity contest.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/damnfineguy/My%20Toys%20600/IMG_0090b.jpg
My T3 Super Varmint in .223

AllRoundHunter
January 24, 2009, 10:06 PM
I own both, and I love both. However..... when I am hiking in Colorado or Montana hunting big game I will take my Tikka T3 Lite everytime. I like the light weight, synthetic stock and I am not worried about scratching it. The silky smooth action is second to none. The crisp trigger is nicer than my Remington. At deer camps my Tikka T3 gets more attention than my Remington, if that sort of thing is important to you. I am fortunate enough to hunt with people that know that its not just a "plastic" stock, they are educated enough to know that in many ways its better than wood, so I have not had to convince anyone that its a better option than wood for hard core hunting. Look at the ballistics of the 300WSM, its a killer caliber!!

jlynch65
December 13, 2009, 05:58 PM
I own both guns an ever since getting the T3 I never use my Remington anymore. The Tikka is lighter and has the smooths action of any bolt action gun I've tried at any price. It's in .270 an shoots sub-1" groups all the time. What is there not to love about this gun?

Dill
December 13, 2009, 07:04 PM
read the Remington 597 thread at the top of this forum section and tell me if you feel much like supporting Remington anymore.

takem23
December 13, 2009, 09:38 PM
I'm not anti Remington from anything I've heard or read on a forum. I have owned 3 new Remingtons and all of them had massive problems. 2 were not in working condition out of the box. Actually got a refund for one. Took four months though. So I would have to say tikka. Maybe it will save you some grief.

warbirdlover
December 14, 2009, 01:16 PM
A few years ago I was "sold" into the Remington mind frame by all the TV "pros" using them. So I bought a 7mm Rem mag BDL. Worst manufactured POS I've ever purchased. It would NOT chamber factory Remington ammunition. It would only chamber Winchester. When I fired a round and rotated the case 90º it would not go back in the chamber. The chamber was oval. And the blueing on the bolt handle looked brown. It would be lucky to shoot 2" groups. My Ruger 77 Mk II takes the cheapest factory loads and is always sub-MOA if I do my part.

SIL has a Tikka T3 and although I've never shot it seems pretty nice. Maybe not a Tikka but surely not a Remington.

ARDogman
December 14, 2009, 08:34 PM
I have a Remington. I dig it in a big way. I was going to get a Tikka just a little bit ago, but opted for a CZ instead. Brand loyalty is for people that don't have the sense to determine what they need at the time. I prefer Remington, I'll openly admit that, but that doesn't mean that I have to get a Remington every time.

FWIW, seems like Tikka fans are a little thin-skinned. I really like the T3 Lite SS...but I'm now afraid that if I buy one I'll be easily offended.

Armed Citizen
December 14, 2009, 08:40 PM
I've got the Rem. 700 SPS and love it, It's a Remington what's not to like.

Blackops_2
December 14, 2009, 08:46 PM
As everyone stated you can't go wrong with either. And when thats laid out it's time to see how the gun fits and price. I got my 700 5R and ill put it lightly She's my "baby". Of course i've poured money into my remington to get it how i want it. Which was set up for LR haha.:D