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hogdogs
July 10, 2008, 12:57 PM
Which is better? Limited to no choke swapping to worry about mess but don't want one seized up from rust or heat... I have no hands on experience with them.
Brent

JWT
July 10, 2008, 01:15 PM
Get lube that is specifically made for choke tubes. These type lubes are made for choke tubes and prevent them from seizing up. Midway USA carries several brands including Brileys.

Juhosaphat
July 10, 2008, 01:51 PM
Are you saying you only want to use one and don't want to have to worry about rust or seizing up? Or you want to be able to switch them out without having to worry about it? If you want one choke only, get loctite red. That stuff never comes loose and is non-corrosive. They use it on engine bolts. If you want to be able to swap them out easily, get the mentioned choke oil. Either one will take care of either situation :p

hogdogs
July 10, 2008, 01:56 PM
I do not own multiple chokes... yet. I do not want to fear it ever seizing. I would like to know that when I choose to put in a different tube, it will part from the barrel with little effort and ZERO damage. Thus red loctite is OFF LIMITS to me..
Brent

cxg231
July 10, 2008, 01:57 PM
Hogdogs - just my opinion, but I would use a thick hi-temp grease like a lithium grease for brake calipers. It will prevent rust and should not seize under pretty much any conditions since it will not migrate under heat.

Plus you can get a big ol tube of it that will last you practically forever for like $5 at the local auto store. :D

However, opinions are like you-know-whats, everyone has one. :D

hogdogs
July 10, 2008, 02:38 PM
In that case I should be good.I have "the real grease" synthetic red reel lube. Thanks... I was worried about a grease but gonna give it a whirl... I dread using my never seize as it is just as messy as a 2 year old with a triple scoop ice cream cone on a summer day!:D
Brent

ronto
July 10, 2008, 03:12 PM
Automotive type anti-seize compound works for me.

cxg231
July 10, 2008, 03:16 PM
In that case I should be good.I have "the real grease" synthetic red reel lube. Thanks... I was worried about a grease but gonna give it a whirl...

So long as it stays solid above the maximum temp your barrel will reach, grease is fine. You just don't want it to run out of the threads of the choke when the going gets hot.

BigJimP
July 10, 2008, 03:31 PM
There are choke tube greases out there - made by all kinds of companies - but most of them are too heavy.

I have a number of guns with screw in chokes. I remove them and clean them about every other trip to range / unless its been a real wet day then every time. Wipe the threads clean on the choke / clean the threads inside the barrel with an old toothbrush - then use a liberal amount of Break Free liquid and screw them back in. When you screw the choke in - if it doesn't go in easily (without a wrench ) back it out / clean threads in barrel and on choke again - relube and put it back in. As you screw the choke in - insert your finger inside the choke tube and you should be able to firmly seat it with only 'finger force' - and if you need more than that / clean it again. Put all the choke tube wrenches away .....to use only in an emergency if you get one stuck and it won't come out easily with finger pressure ( and it doesn't matter if its a flush mounted choke or an extended choke).

If you leave them in, without cleaning them, they can get gummed up and be virtually impossible to remove without damaging them. Even if you only have one choke for the gun / just clean it and lube it once in a while and you'll be fine. I see siezed up chokes too often / and somebody using a wrench and getting one cross threaded in a barrel ....and its not good. Forget the grease ( it collects too much debris ) - and just use Break Free.

Some of my screw in choke guns are coming up on 35 years old - and doing this, I've never had one stick that I couldn't remove easily.

RoscoeC
July 10, 2008, 04:40 PM
I use and like this stuff. A tube is about a lifetime supply. It is an anti-seize compound rated to 2000 degrees. So, even if it does "dry up", the solid lubricant (graphite, I think) will still prevent it from seizing up. I just throw it in the range bag with the extra chokes. I pretty much put a light coat of it on a new tube's threads, and that is about that is all that is required. Works real good, lasts a long time.


http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=34088&stc=1&d=1215725827

Scattergun Bob
July 10, 2008, 06:41 PM
RoscoeC has the right idea for securing permanent chokes. I used both the Birchwood product and Brileys. Both have synthetics in them that exceed the temperature of your barrel after cranking off lots of rounds, I believe both of these products exceed 2000 degrees. One issue that arose when we ran Mike S's patternmaster buckshot chokes in our patrol guns was that every once in awhile they loosened and needed to be tightened with a small strap wrench. Might want to check that on occasion.

Good Luck & Be Safe

RoscoeC
July 10, 2008, 10:24 PM
One issue that arose when we ran Mike S's patternmaster buckshot chokes in our patrol guns was that every once in awhile they loosened and needed to be tightened with a small strap wrench. Might want to check that on occasion.


Dead right. I shoot skeet and or sporting clays almost every weekend. I just finger tighten the chokes I use (extended Angleports with knurled end). I snug them up after every station. Don't need a wrench. They often need about a quarter turn. No big deal for me, but I change them often.

If you want to put one in and just leave it there, the strap wrench (for extened tubes), or the regular wrench (for flush tubes) is the way to go.

banditt007
July 10, 2008, 10:50 PM
i second the automotive anti seize. also just do this. every time you clean the gun unscrew the tube, take a peek in, and if the threads look good, a light oil or antisieze and back in it goes. i've used anti sieze and never had a problem. specific choke tube lube is a marketing rip off. its metal w/ something threaded into it that gets a bit hot every now and then. Nothing more to it. its not magic b/c its threads on a gun vs threads on a car. JMO...

Ruger4570
July 10, 2008, 11:51 PM
I seldom change my chokes in dedicated guns. I use anti seize because it seems to allow me to change chokes afer a year or so with no problem. I guess other products might work as well though. Anti seize certainly is a messy product though, regardless of how well it works :D

nutty ned
July 11, 2008, 07:19 PM
Just use Breakfree and clean the threads regularly with a rag and breakfree. use your finger covered by the rag.