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View Full Version : What can I hunt w/ 35 rem?


Kermit
April 18, 2008, 04:12 PM
I recently acquired a Marlin in 35 remington -- mostly because I have wanted a lever gun and also the price condition of this one. Anyway, it wasn't in 30-30, which would have been my 1st choice, but in 35 remington.
I'm told I can hunt most anything I might run into but I was curious, was is this round capable of?

spctim11
April 18, 2008, 04:14 PM
That is what my brother uses to slay deer with.

rem870hunter
April 18, 2008, 05:04 PM
my father killed 2 deer and a black bear with his marlin in .35 rem. and my grandad killed atleast 1 deer with his. the deer were each taken with one shot apiece. the black bear my dad hit her with 4. it rolled around trying to get up. he hit her with 2 more. it was on all fours moving slowly until he started shooting, after the first 2 hits she kicked it into high gear and tried to get away.

i haven't taken any shots with mine yet. but i am pretty confident i'll make a clean kill if i get a shot. others may disagree but i am glad you got the marlin in .35 rem and not in 30/30. i feel that even with good shot placement the .35 is a better round than the 30/30. its(the 30/30) been around a long time but i don't feel its enough for black bear.

taylorce1
April 18, 2008, 05:38 PM
Deer, elk, moose, black bear are on the list of the .35 Rem with good shot placement and knowing your limitations. I don't know too many animals that will stand up to a 200 grain slug at moderate velocity. It isn't always the best choice in cartridges but in heavy woods and dark timber it should work fine.

crowbeaner
April 18, 2008, 06:23 PM
That 35 will hit deer so hard at ranges under 150 yards that you can see daylight under their hooves. I had one for a number of years and it makes one fine treestand rifle for thick woods. It actually kicked less than my .44 magnum, and shoots farther. Too bad that Speer only offers their flatpoints in 180 and 220 grain. They are really missing a bet without a 200 to duplicate factory ammo. I shot my best groups with 39.5 of IMR 4064 and the RP 200 grain RNSP. Good luck, and enjoy your oldie but goodie.

bswiv
April 18, 2008, 07:14 PM
I've got a old one, a Glenfield model if you remember when Marlin used to make them. It's got a 1/2 magazine and the barrel has been cut to 18 inches. Have a Red Dot mounted on it. Kind of a forrunner of the guide gun concept.

Use it for deer and hogs in the thick stuff here in NE FL. Plenty of power with not much recoil. And as short as it is ( and light! ) it's perfect when we slip through the palmettos after hogs.

Nice thing is that it will usually, even on big hogs, give you a exit wound so tracking is easier. And because the bullet is traveling a bit slower than with something like a .308 tissue damage is less. That translates into less ruined meat should a shot not be where it's suposed to go.

sleepy
April 18, 2008, 07:58 PM
In North America, you can use the 35 Rem for anything but Grizzlies. One deer that I shot this past season had a very clean 1 inch diameter hole through the base of the neck where I shot it.

Longfoot
April 18, 2008, 09:15 PM
In North America, you can use the 35 Rem for anything but Grizzlies.

and browns :)

MeekAndMild
April 18, 2008, 09:55 PM
Deer, lots of deer! I was extremely doubtful the first couple of one-shot deer I got with mine but that has changed through the years.:D

Nearly forgot armadillo, but don't expect to get any edible meat from them. ;)

Quickdraw Limpsalot
April 18, 2008, 10:55 PM
I've killed a big ol' pile of deer with mine (and never lost a single one using the 'obsolete' .35) & if we had hogs around here I'm certain it'd do a fine job on them too. I hear it's a good round for black bear as well, but we don't have those either.

aaalaska
April 19, 2008, 01:01 AM
was told the 35 wasn't enough for moose , sure hope the one in the frezer don't hear that.

Wildalaska
April 19, 2008, 02:10 AM
Even grizzly

WildasktheoldtimersAlaska TM

Iosco-Bucks
April 19, 2008, 08:57 AM
We've had a couple 35 Rems in our camp over the years and they have taken a number of deer. My uncle still carries his 35 during the rifle season. Though most of us went the route of the higher velocity 30 cals, I'd have no issues with taking the 35 Rem into the woods. I'd like to get my hands on a 35 Whelen, too.

stevelyn
April 19, 2008, 10:09 AM
Even grizzly

WildasktheoldtimersAlaska TM

Yup, there's plenty of them out here on the AK PEN that upended a few browns.

.45 Vet
April 19, 2008, 11:09 AM
.35Rem, along with the .30/30 was the hunting standard in the Penn. deer woods for decades. With the big push for paper/pulp products and power-lines, we get a lot more open shooting and folks have moved to .27 & .30 cal bolt guns. My son still carries my Dad's old 141 pump in .35Rem. It's accounted for a couple score,(40+),deer and a few black bear since bought in the 50's.

Scope it,get to know it, and you've got a decent deer rifle... :)

Jack O'Conner
April 21, 2008, 02:40 PM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/elkcowPA.jpg

This a full sized elk cow taken with an older Remington slide action rifle in 35 and plain but effective 200 grain Remington soft tip ammo. The animal weighed approx 600 lbs.

I hunted with a Cree guide in Saskatchewon in 1980's. He had a very old antique Remington auto-loader in 35 that he used to take dozens of moose and caribou. none got away.

Good hunting to you.
Jack

Doyle
April 21, 2008, 03:24 PM
It is an ideal pig gun.

jlchucker
April 21, 2008, 04:32 PM
Pretty much everything in the US--maybe even including earlier poster Roy Reali's California deer that are supposedly too tough for a 30-30! It's a great caliber, and whatever you shoot with it, presuming, of course, good shot placement, should go down.

mnhntr
April 22, 2008, 11:44 AM
i have a marlin in 35 rem and i would hunt any animal on the north american continent with it. it is a good short range to 200yd gun for any big game.

Scorch
April 22, 2008, 01:27 PM
deer that are supposedly too tough for a 30-30You can no longer hunt anything with a 35 Remington, unfortunately. Many game animals simply refuse to lay down and die unless they are shot with a 500 Boomenphlop Sooopr Maaaaaagnum, which shoots solid unobtanium bullets at 15000 fps and generates 1 million ft-lbs of energy anywhere along its trajectory yet kicks like a 22LR. :rolleyes:

Fortunately, many animals have not yet heard of this rifle, so they may be tricked into falling down dead by shooting them with any other round right where it counts.

The 35 Rem is one of the all-time great big game rounds. Hunt with it and enjoy.

BIGR
April 22, 2008, 07:58 PM
Buddy of mine has taken several deer with a .35 Great brush gun.

Wuchak
April 22, 2008, 08:36 PM
If you reload you can use handgun bullets at lower velocities for small game too. It's a very versatile round. It's just been around so long that it gets ignored.

roy reali
April 22, 2008, 08:47 PM
Take a sharpie and write the word magnum on the box of .35 Remington ammo. Make sure it is large enough for the deer to see it. The fear factor alone will send poor ol' Bambi into cardiac arrest.:D

humanitarian2112
April 23, 2008, 01:21 AM
It's a fine round. .35 makes big holes and puts brown down. I would not call it the all-round north amreican game killing round, but I'd take it anywhere and do anything (as long as I had backup in ALbigbearsmightbenearmeASKA)

jamaica
April 23, 2008, 11:54 AM
Anything you want.

Jack O'Conner
April 24, 2008, 09:15 AM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/cowelkforest.jpg

At one time, the 35 Remington was the most powerful semi-auto hunting rifle available in North America. It was named model 8. Remington poster ads of the time often showed hunters reaching for their model 8 while a grizzley or bull moose was bearing down on them. Exciting posters that can be viewed at the Cody Firearms Museum in Cody, Wyoming.

In 2008, specialty ammo from a number of makers offer 225 grain heavy jacketed bullets for 35 Remington. Same makers offer flat nosed 180 grain bullet by Hornady which was designed for .356 Winchester. Hornady offers their widely acclaimed leverevolution ammo in 35 as well. In summary, many choices for the 35 Remington hunter.

These cow elk are tough but not armor-plated. Weight is estimated at 520 lbs. but they can't stand up to a well placed big game bullet!

Good hunting to you.
Jack

noname2031
May 2, 2016, 09:42 AM
Well, I would'nt purposely take mine on a grizzly hunt( only because I have bigger guns), but I'd dang sure shoot one with it if I needed too! Mine has never had any problem with deer and hogs, and I did put down a 1400 lb beefalow for a friend ( thing went nuts, tore up the cattle trailer and half of his barn) that he was trying to load to take to slaughter. Not sure that would count the same way as a grizzly intent on having you for dinner though. But I'm pretty sure with the right ammo/bullet combo and good shot placement, that it would do the job!

hoghunting
May 2, 2016, 11:49 AM
While I've seen some old threads brought back to life, this 8 year old thread is probably one of the oldest.

Sure Shot Mc Gee
May 2, 2016, 10:55 PM
Bloviating expressed by those owners of the 35 Rem promoting the 35s big game killing efficiency exceeding that of the venerable 30-30. Really? :confused:

Federal's ballistic table is typical of today's market place available ammo and its ballistic stats:
Fact: the 30-30 170 gr. betters the Energy stats of a 35 rem 200 gr. from muzzle to 500 yards.
The 30-30 also betters the 35 Rem in Velocity from muzzle to 500 yards.

No bloviating here >those (above) are the facts.

603Country
May 3, 2016, 08:47 AM
Many years ago, Dad bought Marlin 336's for himself, my brother, and for me. They chose 30/30 as their caliber and I chose 35 Remington. We each killed a truckload of deer over the years, and we argued long and hard over which caliber was best. There really isn't winner to the argument. I'd still choose the 35.

I eventually moved to the 270 for better accuracy at distances past 200 yards. The 35 and 30/30 are good to 150 yards or a bit more, due to the rainbow bullet trajectory. My longest kill shot was 260 yards. My most effective shooting was 3 deer in about 10 seconds, and 2 of them were running. I could work that lever. Wish I still had that rifle.

jmr40
May 3, 2016, 10:46 AM
All modern cartridges from 243 and up will take any game in North America including 30-30 and 35. Some might be on the small side for brown bear including 30-30 and 35, but will take them. The difference is how close are you willing to get. Despite claims by many the 35 has never offered any advantage over 30-30. The 30-30 was introduced in 1895, the 35 Rem in 1906. Both were obsolete in 1893, before they were even introduced and both were a step backwards in firearms development.

Sure you can kill stuff with either. Doesn't make either a good choice. You can kill stuff with a flintlock or spear too. Hunt with what you like, just don't try to convince anyone that there is anything special about them.

alex0535
May 3, 2016, 01:52 PM
Zombie thread, oh well I like the 35 rem. Have one that's been putting deer on the ground since the 50's. I don't often feel comfortable with brush shots, but if I did the 200 grain 35 is pretty good for that. I've never lost a deer with it. I find the recoil very manageable. They never run far. Doesn't leave a huge bloodshot exit wound. Outdated or not the deer or hog doesn't know what year it is.

Inside 100 yards, I feel like could hunt any medium to large animal in this state like deer, black bear, feral hog. I'd feel like I had plenty of gun to bring back meat.

All this being said, in the other direction to a much more modern caliber I really would like the 6.5x47 lapua. Similar performance, but much better accuracy out to 1000 yards. The most accurate mild recoiling caliber lapua could design for 300-1000 meter competition. Think it would make a great light deer rifle.

stagpanther
May 3, 2016, 03:18 PM
I almost bought one a year ago--but instead built an AR in 358 win. Gamekings work great out of it--but I guess that's not an option for you having a tubular magazine--but I just bought some .358 200 gr ftx's and that might be a good option for you.

eastbank
May 3, 2016, 04:31 PM
if you reload, start to pick up cases. when you get to 200-250 you will be set for life. plenty of good .35 bullets available,but cases seem to be getting scarce. eastbank.

979Texas
May 3, 2016, 04:57 PM
With proper bullet construction and weight you can take anything in North America with a .35. Its not the best choice for everything but it certainly is capable.

I am rather fond of this cartridge as I inherited a 1925 model Remington Gamemaster pump .35 that had been in the family two generations prior to me. The gun no longer cycles and I dont have the spare money to take it to the smithy, but that is a goal of mine. But for years the gun worked fine in my possession and I had some very enjoyable hunts with it.

I just ran open sights on it and used only Hornady 200 grain leverevolution ammo. I only hunted hogs with it and it would tear them up. It put huge holes in every hog I shot with it and most of them anchored immediately, but for the ones that didnt they never made it far and they were very east to track. Because beside the considerable blood trail alone there were pieces of bone, tissue, muscle, and organs along the blood trail. That .35 BY FAR made for the easiest blood tracking on hogs than any other gun I have wounded a pig with. All other calibers its rare that I will ever get a blood trail, like I havent had a blood trail on a wounded pig in about 4 years. But I never wound many. And with that ol .35 I was pretty much guaranteed a blood if not a blood and chunks of body trail on pigs which are notorious for not leaving any blood trails. Anyone with hog hunting experience knows that.

But it was just a very fun gun to carry and hunt with. I also LITERALLY blew a few nutrias in half with it at very close range :D

stagpanther
May 3, 2016, 05:54 PM
With proper bullet construction and weight you can take anything in North America with a .35. Its not the best choice for everything but it certainly is capable.

I am rather fond of this cartridge as I inherited a 1925 model Remington Gamemaster pump .35 that had been in the family two generations prior to me. The gun no longer cycles and I dont have the spare money to take it to the smithy, but that is a goal of mine. But for years the gun worked fine in my possession and I had some very enjoyable hunts with it.

I just ran open sights on it and used only Hornady 200 grain leverevolution ammo. I only hunted hogs with it and it would tear them up. It put huge holes in every hog I shot with it and most of them anchored immediately, but for the ones that didnt they never made it far and they were very east to track. Because beside the considerable blood trail alone there were pieces of bone, tissue, muscle, and organs along the blood trail. That .35 BY FAR made for the easiest blood tracking on hogs than any other gun I have wounded a pig with. All other calibers its rare that I will ever get a blood trail, like I havent had a blood trail on a wounded pig in about 4 years. But I never wound many. And with that ol .35 I was pretty much guaranteed a blood if not a blood and chunks of body trail on pigs which are notorious for not leaving any blood trails. Anyone with hog hunting experience knows that.

But it was just a very fun gun to carry and hunt with. I also LITERALLY blew a few nutrias in half with it at very close range And the moral of that story is--all other things being equal--bigger holes are better! : )

pappa
May 3, 2016, 09:31 PM
Most pleasant, totally effective, cartridge to shoot that I have. Second to it is my 7x57. Third surprisingly is my 7 Rem mag (26" barrel). 200 yds or under, .35 Rem drops deer and hog just as quick, just as dead. Love my 06 also, but it in most cases is overkill. If I lived in the great open spaces of the west I'd use the 7 Rem, 30-06, and might buy a round loaded these days getting closer in flat shooting to the 7 mag -- the .270 Winchester. Which one have I shot (almost all one shot neck shots, or just behind the ear on hogs) the most with; my Marlin 336 35Rem. Might just choose to be buried with it. You got yourself one fine rifle.

Wyosmith
May 3, 2016, 11:32 PM
I had one 30 years ago and I regret selling it. A marlin 336 rifle with a 1/2 mag and a pistol grip stock. I put a receiver sight on it and it shot very well.
I killed some big western Mule Deer with it. I used 220 grain Speer bullets and some old Remington bullets (200 grain I think)

I also hunting elk with it a few times but never got to shoot an elk when I had it with me, so I have no report to pass on, but I am sure it would have been fine.

I was hunting them in those days in the Selway of Idaho, and shots were always under 50 yards in that thick timber.
My friend Greg also borrowed it one time to kill a bear. One shot and we had a dead bear about 225 pounds.

I can't say I ever had anything bad to say about the rifle or the cartridge.

GarandTd
August 10, 2016, 09:23 AM
As long as 35 is Alive and well, there is no need for the thread to die. Every old thread revived is one less useless new one cluttering up the works.

I have a 1946 Remington Gamemaster 141 that dropped my 1st PA whitetail buck, several Montana mule deer for my dad, and who knows what for his father who bought the rifle new. It's a good brush gun and more than adequate for most American large game. I would say it's biggest shortcoming would be range.

shootbrownelk
August 10, 2016, 10:20 AM
Think of the .35 Remington as a "Short" .35 Whelen. It'll do anything you want within reason. It's an under 150 yd. proposition, IMO anyway.

mete
August 10, 2016, 12:37 PM
While the 35s all work well ,35Rem, 358Win, 35Whelen, They never have been as popular as things like the 30-30 .But bigger holes are better and the 35s just do the job ,not caring about the hype of others. :p

Sure Shot Mc Gee
August 11, 2016, 06:50 AM
What can I hunt w/ 35 rem? Anything considered Big Game at close range in the Lower 48.

mavracer
August 11, 2016, 07:29 AM
Apparently you can't kill an 8 year old zombie thread with one lol.

Backroad
August 12, 2016, 08:37 PM
I've hunted with my Marlin for years and find it safe to say that the .35 Rem will anchor any animal on the north American continent.

al

WVMountaineer
August 17, 2016, 07:43 PM
With the Hot Core Speer 220 grain bullets, some AA2520, you can push them in the 2300 fps range according to men on another forum. These were chrono'ed results. Some were going even higher. Folks, that is a freight train. It was rivaling magnum cartridges that are surrounded by lore, with the energy it safely produces with these loads.

As a factory round or, as a loaded plain Jane bullet, you are going to look long and hard to find a harder hitting caliber for big game. In it's effective range, that bullet surface is so big and, the weight of them, equals hammertime. I've killed a lot of deer with them. FLAT. When you start pushing them, they become even more incredible on those through the body shots. It really thumps them.

I love the round. I hand load for it mostly but, still do shoot factory rounds out of one of the two I own. Both do great. Don;t let ballistic tales fool you. A bullet that big, weighing that much, delivers all of it's energy and, has lots more knock down power than those tables can take into account. Use them You'll love 'em. God Bless

stagpanther
August 18, 2016, 01:44 AM
I love the round. I hand load for it mostly but, still do shoot factory rounds out of one of the two I own. Both do great. Don;t let ballistic tales fool you. A bullet that big, weighing that much, delivers all of it's energy and, has lots more knock down power than those tables can take into account. Use them You'll love 'em. God BlessExactly the way I feel about the 358 win--which pushes the 35 even faster. ;)

reynolds357
August 18, 2016, 07:49 AM
Even though this is an old thread: I believe the .35 Remington is about the ideal heavy woods deer hunting cartridge.

Mobuck
August 20, 2016, 08:15 PM
Something that's not too hard to kill and dumb enough to let you get fairly close.

Old Bill Dibble
August 20, 2016, 08:45 PM
At one time, the 35 Remington was the most powerful semi-auto hunting rifle available in North America.

That must have been a very short reign as the .30-06 came out in the same year.

mavracer
August 21, 2016, 09:40 AM
That must have been a very short reign as the .30-06 came out in the same year.
The Remington Model 8 came out in 08 the 30/06 wasn't available in a commercial semi auto till after WW2

Old Bill Dibble
August 21, 2016, 04:14 PM
True but did not the Model 8 come in .300 Savage well prior to the US entry in WWII?

mavracer
August 21, 2016, 06:26 PM
No not in the model 8, the 300 savage was available when they redesigned into the Model 81 in 1936.

Picher
August 25, 2016, 10:15 AM
The .35 Rem is a very capable cartridge, made even better by Lever-Revolution ammo.

The problem is not with the cartridge, it's with the sighting system that comes on the rifles. I've had friends who shot well on target not be able to hit a deer with the open rear sight.

One friend never got a deer, but shot at about 5 per year. He looked right over the rear sight. After I installed a receiver sight (and higher front), he hit a running deer at 50 yards in the woods. Thought he missed the first shot, so shot again. The first went through the heart and the second, the neck. Both were killing shots.

Another friend and shooting buddy shot five rounds at a standing buck, at about 40 yards. He missed, and the deer just stood there, looking at him.

Bottom line, get a receiver sight, a red dot, or low-powered scope on that baby before you miss or worse, wound a deer and have it run off!!!