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Eat Dirt
April 8, 2008, 11:05 PM
I need a little advice on this one ....

I got this old Spanish shotgun as part payment on some work I did for a friend ( He knew I was looking for a double barrel 12 gauge )

The stock has a bad crack on it and looks to be clean thru
Below are a few pictures so you can see the damage
I did some research and found the year to be about 1934
The shot gun has some nice engraving on it so I would like to take a shot at repairing the stock
Anybody have any helpful hints... ????
On the first photo the crack can be seen to the left of the start of the cherckering
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f365/eatdirt76/Rview-1.jpg

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f365/eatdirt76/Lview-1.jpg

10-96
April 8, 2008, 11:35 PM
Ouch! Tough call without eyeballing and measuring firsthand. But just on a hunch- I suspect I would first look at removing the stock, drilling from the inside (action end) for large hardwood or brass dowel(s) and large amounts of acraglass or fiberglass/epoxy resin. This may not work if the break is at the base of the saddle cut- no, that's not entirely true. It would still involve drilling close to the surface, installing hard wood, glassing, and then re-constructing the factory cut and contour. Like I said- that's just a hunch. It's hard to tell without looking it over while outside of the receiver.

Bill DeShivs
April 9, 2008, 03:12 AM
Make sure there is no oil in the break before you repair it!
I suggest several applications of spray Brake Parts cleaner, then an alcohol soak-blotted up with paper towels.

alfred
April 9, 2008, 03:31 PM
You can drill,tap and screw in readily available steel or Stainless Steel rods by locking down two nuts on it or slotting the end.This strengthens the joint.Readily available "Pulley Taps" are made to reach down in a hole or for threading something a long ways with care.Gun stocks and fore stocks will take metal taps and thread.Large wood screws and Small "Lag Bolts"have been used.Practice on scrap that has sat with the gun stock for several days to eliminate any moisture differences that could affect your trial results.Go the same as the stock grain each time.You can adjust your drill size if too tight or too loose.If you stick your rod or tap in scrap,you can destroy the wood to release it.When you got it down,go for it with the gun stock.

This is a old way of doing it I watched about 50 years ago.The glue used was the old hide leather glue as that was all the farmer had.Old square head bolts were used.The old H&R Topper was still teaching kids to shoot a couple of years ago.Still is as far as I know and no trouble whatsoever out of the joint in all of this time.

I AIN'T DEAD AND I AIN'T QUITING.alfred

ZeroJunk
April 9, 2008, 04:35 PM
This is one of those FWIW posts. I have never glued a stock back together, but I have torn wood framed fiberglass boats all the way down to the glass and built them back. Stringers , transom, floor and all. I can tell you that you can take West Systems 105 epoxy and mix it with a thickening compound like West Systems 403 or Cabisil to a peanut butter like consistency and once it sets up between two pieces of wood you will tear your wood all to pieces before you will get it apart. I still have wood stuck to my C clamps where I got a little epoxy under them.

VaFisher
April 9, 2008, 05:48 PM
Diddo on the West Systems, it's some tuff stuff.

Eat Dirt
April 9, 2008, 07:11 PM
Dang ,,,, Thanks for all the good information guys ...

I'll take it apart and see how bad the damage to the stock REALLY is and hopefully be able to save it
Next question on the same item :: On the second picture there is a small fleck of the wood gone in the crack . About the size of a small Pea
How do I make that disappear ??

I think somebody was shotting both barrels at the same time and that is what happened .. Really a shame .. But I want to try to bring it back

ZeroJunk
April 9, 2008, 08:20 PM
An old style fix is to take a belt sander to a piece of walnut. Mix the dust with wood glue to a paste of a consistency you can work with and fill the hole.

10-96
April 11, 2008, 05:48 PM
+1 on the wood dust and wood glue slurry mix.