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View Full Version : Bipod or Stix - Experienced Opinions Sought


djonathang
April 1, 2008, 08:54 AM
Hello All,

In T-minus 9 days, I'll be receiving my Browning Stalker, A-Bolt, 270. I'm tremendously excited.

I've been researching (reading on this site) people's comments about bipods and shooting stix.

As is frequently the case in internet research, one can become overloaded with the Ford vs. Chevy syndrome.

I like the idea of not having a bipod continually connected to my rifle, but the notion of reaching into a backpack and/or sheath and pulling out stix which unfold seems both time consuming and noisy. I'm imagining tent poles that are shock corded, making that click, click, click sound as they come together. I read one post where that sound spooked the animal.

So, I'd appreciate hearing from folks who use the stix. Is it fluid, and quiet? Finally, should I care whether they are camo versus matte black? In my case, my rifle is black and stainless, so it seems the extra $ for camo isn't worth it.

Thanks for your time and thoughts.

DG

Kreyzhorse
April 1, 2008, 09:29 AM
I use a bipod out west. I can tell you that in the heat of the stalk, you'll be thankful that the bipod is attached to your rifle. You can adjust the length depending on position and they easily fold up if you are forced to move. Additionally - you don't have to carry them - they are attached to the rifle and aren't in your pack nor will they get left behind in the truck

A Harris bipod attachs to your front swivel and is easy to take off or put on with the twist of a bolt. It requires no modifcation to your rifle.

djonathang
April 1, 2008, 10:42 AM
Kreyzhorse,

Thanks for the reply. Could you tell me which size (height) bipod you use?

Thanks.

DG

Smokin250
April 1, 2008, 11:07 AM
I like both. It certain situations the bipod isn't tall enough, like if i am sitting down on a hill. So my shooting stick is better. I do not have the money for a bi-pod hwoever that is why i bought my shooting stick. But i have used a harris before and it was great except for when i hunted on a hill

Kreyzhorse
April 1, 2008, 11:17 AM
Kreyzhorse,

Thanks for the reply. Could you tell me which size (height) bipod you use?



Of the top of my head, I believe this is the model

Model H: (High) For prone or sitting shooting, it's the best for varmint shooting. Adjustable from 13 1/2" to 23"

www.harrisbipods.com

It's short enough to go prone with and tall enough for sitting position shots. I've made several long distance shots from both positions and really rely on that bipod.

There are also cheaper models out there than Harris, but I've been very happy with mine and I think you'll find it a much better option that shooting sticks.

djonathang
April 1, 2008, 12:52 PM
Kreyzhorse & Smokin250,

Thanks for your insights. Fortunately, I have a little gift money, so I'm going to splurge on the Harris bipod. I'll go with your recommended 13.5 to 23, and will also get the swivel feature that so many have appreciated (allowing for uneven surfaces, and leveling the rifle/scope).

Thanks again.

DG

bclark1
April 1, 2008, 01:50 PM
I have not yet shot with my Harris, but I've had it attached and played with it and looking forward to getting it out. Unless it's the worst thing in the world, I think I will like it. My reason being, I've tried shooting sticks and a monopod. One of the big drawbacks of these are that, unless you can brace them into the ground somehow, they are in a lot of ways only as stable as you are. You are stabilizing one point against motion in one direction. Wherever you have your rifle braced the gun will not move up or down from there. However, a monopod can rock left and right and back and forth, two sticks will still at least rock back and forth, and the rifle can still pivot in 3 dimensions around that point. A bipod seems like a much better means of resisting some of those sources of imprecision. The rifle may still be subject to rotational twitches, but translational movement should be all but eliminated.

Kreyzhorse
April 1, 2008, 01:56 PM
Kreyzhorse & Smokin250,

Thanks for your insights. Fortunately, I have a little gift money, so I'm going to splurge on the Harris bipod. I'll go with your recommended 13.5 to 23, and will also get the swivel feature that so many have appreciated (allowing for uneven surfaces, and leveling the rifle/scope).

Thanks again.

DG

I hope it works out for you. I know its one of the best purchases I've ever made.

jimbob86
April 1, 2008, 02:38 PM
Bi-pods are great for long shots, but hinder the handling characteristics of a hunting rifle, particularly on close snap shots.

Shooting sticks are slower to use, and can be noisy, as noted above. They don't detract from the handiness of the rifle.

A military style sling, properly used, is not as good at steadying the rifle as either of the other two above, but it helps, and has none of the drawbacks.

That said, why would you need a bi-pod or shooting sticks if your quarry is close enough to hear you? I carry sticks on my hunting belt, but only use them on really long "beanfield" shots, where I can not get closer, and have time to get set up for the shot, use a range finder, etc. I use the sling for shots I have more than 3 seconds to make. Practice will allow you to use the sling in good field positions (sitting/rice paddie prone) to make first round hits out to 300 yards or so.

IMHO, you should spend the bi-pod money on practice ammo, or better yet, a cheap handloading set-up and bulk components. Think about it: which would give you more to be proud of? A sub MOA rifle, with a bunch of expensive do-dads hanging off it, or your ability to take your 1.5 MOA rifle and put 5 shots inside a 12 inch circle at 250 yards, from field positions, in under a minute. THAT sort of skill is something to be proud of, and can not be bought with money. You only get that by putting in the time and effort to practice. Strive for that.

djonathang
April 1, 2008, 07:50 PM
Jimbo86,

Your thoughts are greatly appreciated. If I had the time, I'd follow your recommendation to the letter. Unfortunately, the time/practice required to acquire such skill is unavailable at this time. I must therefore rely on some crutches (bipods in this case) to help me steady my rifle. I have enjoyed stalking pigs and placing a decent shot at a close range. I do think that my steadiness can use some help at longer ranges.

I'll report back after I've had an opportunity to test the bipods in a real life (death actually) situation. Should they be a problem, they'll be on eBay the same day. If not, I'll enjoy dinner that night.

Cheers.

DG

Smokin250
April 2, 2008, 10:38 AM
Kreyzhorse & Smokin250,

Thanks for your insights. Fortunately, I have a little gift money, so I'm going to splurge on the Harris bipod. I'll go with your recommended 13.5 to 23, and will also get the swivel feature that so many have appreciated (allowing for uneven surfaces, and leveling the rifle/scope).

Thanks again.

DG

No problem, I hope it works out for you