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View Full Version : Removing rust on blued surfaces--do NOT use oil!!!


JohnKSa
February 23, 2008, 10:48 PM
Use 0000 steel wool DRY.

The removed rust is an abrasive, if you put oil on the metal surface or on the steel wool, the removed rust is retained and rubbed on the surface which can damage the finish.

If you use the steel wool DRY, shake it out frequently and keep the surface of the gun dusted off the removed rust doesn't get rubbed around on the finish. Keeping the steel wool free of rust particle will minimize damage to the remaining finish.

You can oil the metal surfaces AFTER the rust has been removed but you want them to be as dry as possible while you're actually using the steel wool.

I'm posting this because I see a lot of people recommending the use of oil and steel wool to remove rust and I know from experience that is much harder on the finish. I used to have a friend with a gun shop and I would go over all the used guns each week to keep them oiled and rust free. Since they were out in the customer area, not behind the counter, they had been handled and some would build up light surface rust. I would oil them if they weren't rusty and remove the surface rust if they were rusted. It was easy to see the difference between using the steel wool with oil and without.

Bill DeShivs
February 23, 2008, 11:32 PM
Good post, John!
And you are correct!

Shane Tuttle
February 24, 2008, 11:33 AM
I'm not trying to argue, just trying to understand...

If you don't use oil with steel wool, aren't you basically damaging the surface anyway? I thought the use of oil provides a suspension, much like soap does when you wash your car. It keeps the dirt in suspension while the sponge does the cleaning. Then, it washes off taking the dirt with it without scratching the surface.

Is it different in the firearms world?:confused:

JohnKSa
February 24, 2008, 02:09 PM
If one were to frequently rinse the surface and the steel wool with oil as one frequently rinses the sponge and surface while washing a car, one might be able to achieve a good result using oil.

But it's much easier and much less messy to simply use the steel wool dry and dust it and the surface off frequently to keep the rust particles from building up.

I can tell you from experience that using oil is definitely much harder on a blued finish than just using the steel wool dry.

James K
February 24, 2008, 02:50 PM
I don't use steel wool at all. Even the relatively soft steel wool can, and will, damage a blued surface as it is too abrasive. Unless the rust is so bad the finish is beyond recovery, I use bronze, copper, or brass wool, which won't scratch the surface or remove bluing.

Jim

JohnKSa
February 24, 2008, 08:31 PM
That's also a viable solution, but I've had very good luck with steel wool. As long as it's used dry and the rust particles aren't allowed to build up, it's surprisingly hard to damage a blued finish with it. When used with oil, however, you really have to be careful....it is too abrasive.I understand what you're saying, but strictly speaking, steel is not abrasive. Steel wool works because the edges of the wool are sharp, not because the steel wool is abrasive in the conventional sense. Iron oxide (rust), however, is abrasive and even if you use a bronze/brass/copper wool, you still need to make sure that the rust particles don't build up in the wool or on the surface of the metal or the finish can be damaged by the rubbing.

Shane Tuttle
February 24, 2008, 08:49 PM
Thanks for the clarification, John. I just thought that if you keep the surface coated with oil as you use steel wool, the chance of the rust particles causing damage will be nil. I'll have to keep that in mind...

James K
February 25, 2008, 04:21 PM
There is always the big wire wheel, but only if used dry. ;)

Jim

JohnKSa
February 25, 2008, 11:58 PM
There is always the big wire wheel, but only if used dry.:eek: :D

If you used a wire wheel where the diameter of the wire was similar to the diameter of the steel strands in 0000 steel wool, I suppose that would work ok. ;)

If you get coarse enough steel wool then you're going to have troubles with the steel cutting/scratching the finish. With 0000 steel wool, the strands are so flimsy that they're not going to damage the finish unless you're careless with it. Or unless you get an abrasive material embedded in it.

Having tried it both ways and noted a BIG difference, I thought it would be helpful to pass along the information. I'm not trying to convert anyone and I would encourage those who are skeptical to do a careful experiment on their own and do what works best for them. I will say that I've gotten some good feedback from those who have tried it as I describe besides the results I've seen myself.

Best,

John

brickeyee
February 26, 2008, 11:23 AM
Rouge is iron oxide, AKA 'rust'.
It will polish steel, if slowly.
If there are any contaminants in the rust (like salt) they will also act as an abrasive.
The lack of control on particle size does not help either.

I still prefer a brass brush, followed by oiling to prevent further damage.

Hunter Customs
February 26, 2008, 11:09 PM
One of the best smiths that I ever had the pleasure to meet was a firm believer in 0000 steel wool for the removal of surface rust on a blued surface.
This gentleman built some of the sweetest rifles that I ever had the pleasure to put my hands on. The bluing on the metal of these rifles showed your reflection like you was looking into a puddle of water, Colt and Smith and Wesson would have been jealous. More then once I watched him use 0000 steel wool on the metal of one that someone failed to wipe down letting the metal aquire some surface rust. If anything, when he was done the bluing looked brighter and I don't recall any damage being done to the bluing.
Regards
Bob Hunter
www.huntercustoms.com

Alleykat
February 27, 2008, 10:15 AM
I've used 0000 steel wool dry, when blending touch-up bluing. Never had the bluing scratched up yet.

Tom2
February 27, 2008, 07:27 PM
It is all in the touch I guess. You can lightly work it on the surface carefully, or you can go to town and rub as hard as you can and presumably have a different outcome. I don't remember any problems with steel wool four ought on blued guns. As I recall, I have used it dry, but I pretty much have used it for spot touch up, not scrubbing down the whole gun. If the whole gun was rusty, I would not buy it in the first place, unless it was some collectable antique and they are typically in that condx. I agree something like brass brush or softer than steel should be tried first, as you can go harder if needed, but if you start too harsh, too late to go back!

Ledbetter
February 27, 2008, 09:16 PM
Bronze brush is best, so is frequent wiping or flooding.

bfoster
February 27, 2008, 11:54 PM
Steel wool, as it is usually supplied, is lightly oiled.

One very old method of removing light rust, by light rust I mean the haze that can form on highly polished steel, not red rust, is to use 0000 steel wool slightly dampened with turpentine.

Bob

Hunter Camp
August 20, 2011, 04:33 PM
Thanks to all- I am trying to remove small ammt. of rust from 1831 Springfield- modified for Civil war use w. percussion cap. Also, do any of you know a good site to get a sale value for mid 1800's firearms?

JacqueEagonSr
August 22, 2011, 07:44 PM
I do Cowboy Action Shooting (lead in the barrels) and own several old guns that needed rust removed. This stuff cleans barrels in a jiffy and won't harm a blued surface. I don't work for them and I don't sell their product. I just swear by it.

http://www.big45metalcleaner.com/

natman
August 23, 2011, 03:59 AM
I'll agree that it is important to remove the rust as it comes off, whether wet or dry. Aside form that I politely disagree. Your argument seems to assume that if you use oil, you HAVE TO keep all the rust around forever. It's easy enough to wipe off the rusty slurry and apply fresh oil. If you don't use oil you're rubbing DRY rust on your bluing between cleanings.

I've done literally hundreds of guns and reasonable rubbing with 0000 steel wool and oil will not scratch bluing. Period.

Shane Tuttle
August 23, 2011, 08:34 AM
*ahem* Hey, John. You wanna take this one? I mean, since this thread's been revived from the dead and all from 3.5 years ago, maybe you've changed your mind...

Old Grump
August 23, 2011, 03:42 PM
Scotch-Brite cleaning pads works for me. Surface rust on slide, frame or barrels and lead removal from inside the bore.

I have seen CERAMA BRYTE pads but never used them.

If you use a compound with the pads try Flitz

http://www.autogeek.net/flmepopare.html

chadstrickland
August 23, 2011, 03:52 PM
While I have never tried to simply remove one small patch of rust. At the gun shop we always sand blasted all the rust and paint and crap off a gun before we hot blued them :)

Unclenick
August 23, 2011, 04:34 PM
Odds and ends:

The original Scotch-Brite was basically pads made of strands with sanding abrasive glued to them. You can buy it in all grades at industrial suppliers from coarse metal removal down to polishing grades, and in aluminum oxide, aluminum silicate (flint), and silicone carbide. More recently, though, the name brand has been applied to a wide range of products, including all natural fiber pads that aren't supposed to scratch at all.

The Lead Wipe cloths can remove rust, and they use roughly 400 grit aluminum oxide abrasive. It has a hard time damaging bluing, too. Rub it on aluminum, though, and you can see the scuff immediately. The aluminum oxide grains are less sharp than silicone carbide, which is why they don't scratch something hard so easily.

I'm not sure what to make of the dry steel wool idea. I thought the oil was mainly to help loosen the rust. Perhaps it causes larger pieces to get loose, increasing the size of scuffs. In that case, dry followed by wet might help get it all with less scuffing. The presence of oil will make the surface more transparent looking than a dry surface so you can see scuffs better, and that may be coming into play, too.

A good penetrating oil will let you wipe rust off with a rough brown paper towel. So will Gunzilla if you let it sit a little while.

JohnKSa
August 23, 2011, 09:37 PM
There is always the big wire wheel, but only if used dry.It's kind of funny that this thread came back up. I was just reading an article yesterday on rust blueing techniques and the author (Reid Coffield) mentioned that he used a wire wheel (soft thin wire) to card the blueing between "coats".Your argument seems to assume that if you use oil, you HAVE TO keep all the rust around forever. It's easy enough to wipe off the rusty slurry and apply fresh oil.If you can keep all the rust off the surface and out of the steel wool, and still use oil then you may be able to keep it from scratching.

The point is that while steel wool is, at best, a very mild abrasive, iron oxide is a fairly agressive abrasive.

Rubbing with dry steel wool is pretty benign. Rubbing with rust is not, and using some oil doesn't help much if there's a signficant amount of rust retained in the oil unless you're careful to keep the surface and the steel wool flushed out. I find it's MUCH easier to keep the rust out of the equation by using dry steel wool. Then the loosened rust comes off the surface and falls away and it's easy to dust out the steel wool frequently to keep any from building up.I've done literally hundreds of guns and reasonable rubbing with 0000 steel wool and oil will not scratch bluing. Period.I agree that 0000 steel wool and oil won't scratch blueing--in fact it takes some effort to scratch blueing even with unoiled 0000 steel wool. That's as expected given that carding/polishing with 0000 steel wool is part of some blueing processes.

On the other hand, I can demonstrate (and have seen many times) that 0000 steel wool and oil and rust will scratch blueing.

The bottom line is that I've done rust removal using 0000 steel wool with and without oil and find that it's much easier to keep the blue intact without oil--even when there's a significant amount of rust to be removed. I'm talking about light surface rust, not pitting.

I think that a lot of the disagreement comes from people who have tried it only one way and found ways to make it work. Sure, you can make it work with oil, but it's trickier to keep the finish intact if there's any significant amount of rust to remove as opposed to doing it without oil.

It's not like I have anything tied up in this. The only reason I pointed it out was because I have a good bit of experience trying both methods while it appeared to me that most people had always assumed that it should be done with oil and never tried it any other way.

I have no problem if people want to use oil, but I think if they try both ways they will almost certainly get the same results I did.

natman
August 24, 2011, 03:46 AM
I've done literally hundreds of guns and reasonable rubbing with 0000 steel wool and oil will not scratch bluing. Period.
I agree that 0000 steel wool and oil won't scratch blueing--in fact it takes some effort to scratch blueing even with unoiled 0000 steel wool. That's as expected given that carding/polishing with 0000 steel wool is part of some blueing processes.

On the other hand, I can demonstrate (and have seen many times) that 0000 steel wool and oil and rust will scratch blueing.

Oh, please. This is just playing with words. Seriously, do you really believe that the hundreds of guns I was referring to didn't have rust on them?

When you rub dry the rust doesn't magically disappear to rust heaven. It's on the gun, it's in the steel wool. If you want to delude yourself that dry rust is somehow less abrasive than rust suspended in oil, go ahead. But sorry, I'm not buying it.

I once tried to see if I could damage bluing on a scrap barrel by rubbing it with 0000 and oil. And, yes, it was rusty. I finally managed to get the bluing to fade slightly - after 10 minutes of white knuckle rubbing. If you can comprehend the phrase "gentle rubbing" you will not have a problem.

Pahoo
August 24, 2011, 10:06 AM
At the risk of turning this subject, into a spitting contest I will only state what I do and will continue to do. In that, there are no absolutes and would sound opinionated as oppose to having an opinion. ..... ;)

I use a variety of petrochemical products in combination with the 0000 wool, with no noticeable ill effects. Have always been taught that oil, primarily does two things; it cools by reducing friction and it cleans. I've noticed that application of these products alone and letting them sit, starts to desolve and float away some rust. Wipe away the oil and you will see rust on the rag, without the use of 0000. in short, the oil will desolve, clean and float the rust. It's even one of the most effective liquids that you can clean your hands with. ..... ;)

I've used petrochemical product for more years than I care to mention and will continue to do so. ..... ;)

Be Safe !!!

JohnKSa
August 24, 2011, 09:01 PM
If you want to delude yourself that dry rust is somehow less abrasive than rust suspended in oil, go ahead.The point is that they're both about the same in terms of abrasiveness. The difference is that the oil keeps the rust in place unless you make a concerted effort to flush the surface and the steel wool clean while if it's done without oil, the rust falls away and is easily dusted off rather than rubbed around on the surface.I once tried to see if I could damage bluing on a scrap barrel by rubbing it with 0000 and oil. And, yes, it was rusty. I finally managed to get the bluing to fade slightly - after 10 minutes of white knuckle rubbing.That's pretty impressive and I can see how that would strengthen your opinion of the technique. I never had that much luck using oil. If I wasn't very careful it was pretty easy to get the finish to fade with even careful rubbing.

RaySendero
August 24, 2011, 09:32 PM
[Guys, I've had the best luck getting the rust off w/o scratching the bluing using 0000 steel wool and...

Hoppes #9 !!!

natman
August 25, 2011, 07:08 AM
If you want to delude yourself that dry rust is somehow less abrasive than rust suspended in oil, go ahead.
The point is that they're both about the same in terms of abrasiveness. The difference is that the oil keeps the rust in place unless you make a concerted effort to flush the surface and the steel wool clean while if it's done without oil, the rust falls away and is easily dusted off rather than rubbed around on the surface.

I disagree with both points - that oiled rust is as abrasive as dry rust and that dry rust magically vanishes.

I once tried to see if I could damage bluing on a scrap barrel by rubbing it with 0000 and oil. And, yes, it was rusty. I finally managed to get the bluing to fade slightly - after 10 minutes of white knuckle rubbing.
That's pretty impressive and I can see how that would strengthen your opinion of the technique. I never had that much luck using oil. If I wasn't very careful it was pretty easy to get the finish to fade with even careful rubbing.

What's impressed me more is the hundreds - literally hundreds - of guns I've removed rust from with 0000 steel wool and oil without damaging the bluing on a single one. Back in the 80's when you could still get a long gun cash and carry in California, I would buy a cheap beater almost every weekend and fix it up during the week. Since then I've worked for years in a gunshop and you wouldn't believe how rusty some of the gems people put on consignment are. I've removed enough rust off guns to build a small Fiat without once damaging the bluing on any of them.

So given that I disagree with the facts of your premise and since it runs counter to 25+ years of first hand experience, I hope you can appreciate my skepticism.

Peace.

Shane Tuttle
August 25, 2011, 07:34 AM
So given that I disagree with the facts of your premise and since it runs counter to 25+ years of first hand experience, I hope you can appreciate my skepticism.

Skepticism? Yes. Your delivery? ....

All John was saying is his viewpoint and his own experience. Chest thumping about your experience and dismissing his isn't exactly the way to provide your viewpoint here. There's more than one way to skin a cat.

Reminds me when I used to work at a car dealership. Two detailers thought each others' methods were completely ass-backwards and wrong. Yet both produced desireable results in the grand scheme of it all....

natman
August 25, 2011, 02:18 PM
All John was saying is his viewpoint and his own experience. Chest thumping about your experience and dismissing his isn't exactly the way to provide your viewpoint here. There's more than one way to skin a cat.

Reminds me when I used to work at a car dealership. Two detailers thought each others' methods were completely ass-backwards and wrong. Yet both produced desireable results in the grand scheme of it all....

This isn't a "six of one, half a dozen of the other" difference of opinion about which technique gives a better shine, fresher breath or whiter whites. John started this thread warning us in dire tones that using oil to remove rust will damage bluing.

That's a pretty specific statement of fact, which IMO defies both logic and experience.

Let's leave it at that.

JohnKSa
August 25, 2011, 10:11 PM
I disagree with both points - that oiled rust is as abrasive as dry rust and that dry rust magically vanishes.Except that I said neither.

I said they're "about" the same and they are. The abrasives in lapping compounds are still abrasive even though they're suspended in some sort of petroleum based product and while oil may provide some minimal protection against the abrasive action, it won't make an abrasive into a non-abrasive.

And I didn't say anything about anything "magically" vanishing. It's pretty easy to see that if you use oil that the dislodged rust particles are held in place by the oil and can't be easily dusted off as they can be if the removal is done dry. It's not magic at all, it's pretty straightforward logic that's easily verified for those who haven't already had a similar experience.That's a pretty specific statement of fact, which IMO defies both logic and experience.It doesn't defy logic at all, and I've taken pains to explain exactly why what I have said is logical. As far as defying experience, it clearly doesn't defy my experience although it's also clear that your experience and mine differ somewhat.

Rubbing rust on a blued finish will damage it because rust (iron oxide) is an abrasive and rubbing an abrasive on a blued finish will damage it. That said, is it possible to do it with only minimal, perhaps imperceptible damage? Clearly it is as your experience demonstrates. And before I tried it without oil, I was able to do a lot of rust removal using oil and 0000 steel wool without ruining guns although I did get some finish fading at times. However, after experimenting a little, I found that it was much easier to keep the finish intact if I didn't use oil during the actual rust removal process. Others I have mentioned this to have tried the method I suggested and achieved similar results.

Again, it's not like I have anything tied up in this. The only reason I pointed it out was because I have had a good bit of experience trying both methods while it appeared to me that most people had always assumed that it should be done with oil and never tried it any other way.

Again, I have no problem if people want to use oil (why would I?), but I think if they try both ways they will almost certainly get the same results I did.

Bill DeShivs
August 25, 2011, 11:04 PM
The best of both methods is to liberally flush with WD 40-both the part and steel wool, and wipe the part down frequently. I have never used oil, as most oils are too thick and don't penetrate rust as easily as WD 40.

JohnKSa
August 25, 2011, 11:16 PM
That makes sense. Anything that keeps the rust particles from building up and being rubbed around on the surface would do the trick.

I'll try that next time I have some rust removal work to do.

Edward429451
August 26, 2011, 02:36 AM
I've always heard that you should not use steel wool on a gun because the steel particles will get into the pores of the metal and oxidize. One should use 0000 stainless steel wool.

natman
August 26, 2011, 04:09 AM
This is a myth transposed from a true bit of advice concerning using steel wool on wood. Wood has enough pores to capture bits of steel wool which will eventually rust. Blued metal doesn't.

natman
August 26, 2011, 04:17 AM
The best of both methods is to liberally flush with WD 40-both the part and steel wool, and wipe the part down frequently. I have never used oil, as most oils are too thick and don't penetrate rust as easily as WD 40.

That makes sense. Anything that keeps the rust particles from building up and being rubbed around on the surface would do the trick.

I'll try that next time I have some rust removal work to do.

Is this thread coming from the Twilight Zone? After arguing back and forth, someone else proposes precisely the method I've been advocating - keeping the steel wool wet and wiping the part down - and suddenly it makes sense.

You're right Bill, thin oils work best because they penetrate the rust better. WD-40 works just fine, although thicker oils will get the job done in a pinch.

brickeyee
August 26, 2011, 01:37 PM
This is a myth transposed from a true bit of advice concerning using steel wool on wood. Wood has enough pores to capture bits of steel wool which will eventually rust. Blued metal doesn't.

You can rub enough steel into anything but highly polished stainless to then allow surface rust to occur if there is not enough oil present to protect the carbon steel.

I have seen it on brushed finished stainless guns, stainless knife blades, and even stainless kitchen sinks.

I remember shoeing a neighbor how to remove the rust on his kitchen sink from using SOS pads many years ago.

I customer had a stainless rifle that was not oiled well and brought in covered with light surface rust.
He regularly used steel wool to "even up" any minor scratches in the brushed finish, and was unaware that the gun needed at least some oil for protection.

Unclenick
August 26, 2011, 08:58 PM
This is what passivating stainless is for. Etching out the free iron embedded by tooling (in this case steel wool) or other handling problems.

brickeyee
August 27, 2011, 11:06 AM
This is what passivating stainless is for. Etching out the free iron embedded by tooling (in this case steel wool) or other handling problems.

Not just from tooling but cutting the steel atomic structure itself.

When you cut steel you end up with actual atoms of iron no longer protected by the structure of the steel.

Passivisation removes any exposed atoms of iron and leaves behind the alloying elements to form the protection layer.

Unclenick
August 27, 2011, 01:40 PM
I thought the protective chromium oxide layer was supposed to reform itself when you cut stainless, but that you had to have the right chromium percentage for that to work well. Also that the truly stainless stuff wasn't tough enough for gun barrels and knife edges, and so the stainless property was partly compromised in order to get other desirable characteristics for these applications. I haven't studied it carefully. I do know from experience that 318 stainless screws have to be passivated after you buy them, or you get rust stain bleed.

salvadore
August 27, 2011, 03:16 PM
how bout flitz? Is that a good idea?

brickeyee
August 28, 2011, 01:26 PM
I thought the protective chromium oxide layer was supposed to reform itself when you cut stainless, but that you had to have the right chromium percentage for that to work well.

By removing any exposed atoms of Fe during passivation (often a nitric acid dip) the surface is left with only chromium exposed.
The oxidation layer quickly forms from air exposure.

Cutting tools do not have the resolution of atoms and the atomic organization of the metal.

Pbearperry
August 28, 2011, 02:16 PM
I have always used a copper penny on small rust spots.It removes the rust and spares the surrounding bluing.Just rub the spot lightly with the edge of the penny.Afterwards I touch it up with cold bluing and oil.

jimmyraythomason
September 6, 2011, 04:28 PM
Use 0000 steel wool DRY.

The removed rust is an abrasive, if you put oil on the metal surface or on the steel wool, the removed rust is retained and rubbed on the surface which can damage the finish.
I have never had a problem using oil on 0000 steel wool in several decades of using it to remove surface rust from blued finishes. I always use WD-40 and 0000 steel wool to smooth newly blued guns to great affect. If using steel wool dry works for you,great but I'll continue to use oil.

603Country
September 13, 2011, 08:59 PM
The heavier the oil used with the steel wool, the lower the friction and the lower the abrasion. Use motor oil and you probably won't get much abrasion at all. Light machine oil (such as 3 in 1) or a penetrating oil (WD-40)will allow a higher degree of abrasion. Just have more than one pad of steel wool, and swap dirty pads for clean pads - quickly at first and then slower as the rust has been removed. And wipe off the oil on the rust spot between pad replacements and that'll take off any gritty rust residue that's sitting in the oily patch. You might even want to try a good car wax on the steel wool rather than the oil. However you go about it, go slowly and carefully. If 'slow and careful' doesn't take off enough rust, you can always get more energetic with the rubbing.

Inspector3711
September 15, 2011, 12:58 PM
I remove rust on blued steel by soaking with with Kroil every day for several days.

I wipe off the Kroil and loose rust with a rag and then scrub the surface gently with green Scotchbrite. I wipe it clean with a rag and still more Kroil then wipe it dry with a clean rag.

I then gently polish with Flitz. The last step is to oil it.

I have yet to visibly damage the finish or have rust return using this method..

Venom1956
October 8, 2011, 03:39 PM
well since someone briought this back can i ask this. does the thickness of the brass brissles have an effect onn the ability ot scratching bluing? i ask because i am trying to fix up a brown with alot of rust and i am using my brass brush but there seems to be scratches on the bluing already but i want to make sure its not from my brush.

doofus47
October 10, 2011, 10:04 PM
I agree that 0000 steel wool and oil won't scratch blueing--in fact it takes some effort to scratch blueing even with unoiled 0000 steel wool. That's as expected given that carding/polishing with 0000 steel wool is part of some blueing processes.

Hate to boomerang this topic, but:
I just retrieved my deceased dad's shotgun from the homestead and it has light pitting and (for lack of a known term) "chipping" across the surface. It looks like some raised non-slip grip granules were added to some portions (not all) of the shot gun. It's a raised bump. I don't think this qualifies as "surface rust" the fix for which is described above. Or does it?

I ran some oil over the top to make the orange neon glow go away and make myself feel better, but can I use 0000 steel wool without losing the blue? Really? That doesn't seem possible.

Chaz88
October 10, 2011, 10:25 PM
It's a raised bump.

Sounds like intergranular or exfoliation corrosion. If it is, oxidation has started along the grain boundaries of the metal and will be almost imposable to fix, without grinding away the metal tell the corrosion is gone. That would probably destroy the gun.

gyvel
October 11, 2011, 02:11 AM
0000 steel wool and oil is NOT a good combination; However, 0000 and turpentine or 100% pure natural wintergreen oil works wonders. Both of them tend to dissolve the rust crystals and make them less abrasive. Wintergreen oil seems to work better.

doofus47
October 11, 2011, 01:08 PM
That would probably destroy the gun.
I've seen that degree of oxidation and this isn't that deep. It's still more acne than abscess, so I"m probably still on the "surface rust" step of the process.
Thanks for the input.

All in all, it's pretty good for having sat in the back closet with the water heater for 15 years.

C0untZer0
October 11, 2011, 02:55 PM
Schaeffer Oil has a product called "Rust Ender" and Penetro 90 which has Rust Ender in it - both are for eradicating rust.

http://www.schaefferoil.com/penetro-oil.html