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View Full Version : Barrel length and tight patterns....


Super-Dave
February 16, 2008, 06:33 PM
If you were using those advanced buck shot like Federals flight control shells, does barrel lenght really matter when it comes to tight patterns?

If all the pellets stay in the cup untill it exists the barrel, to me it seems the barrel lenght really would not matter?

Bill DeShivs
February 16, 2008, 06:39 PM
No.

Super-Dave
February 16, 2008, 06:49 PM
So if I was using this buckshot Federal flight control,

Theoretically I should get just as tight patterns with a 20" as a 26" firing at 25 yards?

hogdogs
February 16, 2008, 07:19 PM
Now if you wanna toss chokes into the equation I will give a yes it matters! my 18.5 cylindrical does fine but if i could screw a tight azz choke in the end I know it would tighten the pattern for sure!
Brent

Bill DeShivs
February 16, 2008, 10:57 PM
Same choke= reasonably the same pattern.

Double Naught Spy
February 17, 2008, 12:51 AM
Right. Buckshot out of my unchoked Rem 870 with an 18" barrel has an expanding pattern of about 1 inch per yard traveled down range. My neighbor's unchoked shortbarreled shotgun (10" barrel) has a pattern that expands at the same rate.

There is one key difference, however. His pattern falls off sooner as a result of the lower velocity attained from his short barrel.

classic095
February 17, 2008, 04:31 PM
Barrel length is a frame of mind.. some shooters like the longer barrel guns for shooting trap and hunting birds as they have a smoother swing than short lighter guns. A full choke in a 26 and a 30 will give you a pattern that you couldnt measure the difference..

nottelybill
February 17, 2008, 05:30 PM
I know this wasn't the question but the barrel lenght does make a difference in the delivery punch. Most shotgun shells are made to completely burn at about 24 inchs if I am no mistaken. If I am correct me , please.

EHCRain10
February 17, 2008, 06:06 PM
i have read that most shotgun powder is burned within the first 24-26 inches of the barrel making longer barrels somewhat of a disadvantage because the shot begins to lose velocity in the longer barrels

FL-Flinter
February 17, 2008, 10:03 PM
i have read that most shotgun powder is burned within the first 24-26 inches of the barrel making longer barrels somewhat of a disadvantage because the shot begins to lose velocity in the longer barrels

Incorrect. The common test barrel lengths used by ammo mfg's are 30"-36" and that's the velocity printed on the box - the shorter your barrel, the lower your velocity will be using the same load. As long as the pressure in the bore exceeds the resistance of the payload, the payload will continue to accelerate. In order for the payload (shot or bullet) to begin "slowing down in the bore", the pressure would have to drop to a point less than that required to move the payload. Just because all the powder burns in X inches of bore does not mean that the pressure just goes away, it's still contained in the bore and since the bore is fixed, the only way out is through the muzzle.

The longer the barrel, the better your patterns will be especially if you're reloading your own and you can fine tune the loads to the individual gun. I have hand #5 shot hand loads fine tuned for an 18.5" cylinder bore on my M-500 that will pattern as well as any modified choke barrel at 30 yards and yes, I'm giving up alot of velocity working with the stubby barrel. The same ammo fired in my 55 Marlin with its full choke 36" barrel pattern extremely well out to 60yds and leave the muzzle about 300 fps faster.

nottelybill
February 18, 2008, 07:16 AM
I would have to say pressure is also a result of the space it is contained in therefore to maintain it as the shot cups moves forward providing more space the pressure is maintained by the continual burn of the powder.

EHCRain10
February 18, 2008, 08:49 AM
i see the error of my ways thank you for correcting me