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View Full Version : What tools needed for 870 disassembly?


rain252
January 12, 2008, 11:19 PM
What do I need to be able to take a Rem 870 down for changing out the forend, taking it down for thorough cleaning, etc.? I don't mean to be able to strip it down to the smallest part, but just to be able to get the trigger group and bolt out, forend off without damage....like that.
I already have a set of pin punches, and think I need a forend wrench also. Anything else?

kametc
January 12, 2008, 11:31 PM
Spin off the mag tube nut.....pull the barrel off......move the slide forward and everthin is in your hand.. Pay attention how that bolt carrier falls out of there.

Ken

Dfariswheel
January 13, 2008, 12:02 AM
Here's a link to an 870 owner's manual that shows full field stripping.

http://www.remington.com/pdfs/om/om_870.pdf

Just follow the manual to disassemble the gun.

There is no reason to disassemble the trigger group, and DO NOT attempt to remove the ejector from the receiver, OR the shell releases in the bottom of the receiver.
These parts are staked in place, and if removed, they require special factory tools to re-install.

The only tools you'd need are:
A fore arm wrench to allow removal of the fore arm. Unless you're replacing the fore arm there's no reason to remove it.

A screwdriver to remove the magazine spring.

A wooden golf tee.
Use this to push out the trigger guard pins. (Non-scratch).

A small Phillips screwdriver to remove the butt pad.

A large screwdriver to remove the butt stock.
Again, unless you're replacing the stock, there's no reason to remove it.

Happily, the 870 is one of the very easiest of all shotguns to disassemble. Don't disassemble farther then the manual's field stripping unless you absolutely HAVE to.

b.thomas
January 13, 2008, 06:10 AM
Unless your going to change the fore-end you don't even need a fore-end wrench.
In the thirty-plus years I've had my Wingmaster I've never removed the fore-end off the action bars, not even the stock for that matter.:D

BHP9
January 13, 2008, 08:53 AM
IF, you only want to remove the FE an few times the make this.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v104/RePete/FETool.jpg

1/" thick mild steel
1 1/4" wide
2 3/8" long on outside
2 1/4" long on inside
1 1/16" width of gap.

rain252
January 13, 2008, 04:08 PM
Actually, I am changing the forend. Thanks to all for the excellent information.

JoeBeach
April 21, 2012, 07:59 PM
I know about the fore-end tool requirement, but everyone talks about a slotted screw in the stock. Mine does not have that. It has about a quarter inch ball with ears. I know I have seen a tool for this type of fastener befrore but cannot remember what it is. Any info out there.

M4BGRINGO
April 21, 2012, 09:07 PM
I have taken my wifes 870 apart, including forend, with no special tools.

Lee Lapin
April 22, 2012, 06:49 AM
For anyone following up on this necro-thread...

It's a lot easier IMHO to get a forearm properly aligned with the receiver if you use a 'pass-through' tool like the Baker (http://www.midwayusa.com/product/723227/baker-12-gauge-shotgun-forend-wrench-remington-870-browning-bps-mossberg-500-winchester-1200-1300-fn-herstal-police). It allows the work to be done with the action open, which both supports the action bars inside the receiver and helps you get the forearm in just the right place the first time.

Virginian-in-LA
April 23, 2012, 05:31 AM
For cleaning, get an old toothbrush and a shaving brush, too. If you spray RemOil or similar in the receiver and then scrub with the toothbrush you can get all the crevices without cutting your finger. The shaving brush is ideal for the trigger group.

Creek Henry
April 25, 2012, 09:41 PM
I just got my brother an 870 for his 50th and I disassembled it last night and put from fritz metal polish in it, worked the slide a couple of hundred times, cleaned it out (that stuff is nasty), worked on the still rough metal work with some emory cloth, and reassembled it.

I had a GREAT deal of trouble getting the small trigger housing pin in place. There is a flat metal rod that moved about 0.1mm and I had to jostle it back in to place. What a pain.

Anyone ever have that problem?

The gun's action is smoother now but it still feels like a new gun.

Dave McC
April 26, 2012, 01:50 PM
Sounds like the shell latch has come unstaked. Simple fix for a smith. The one I had was fixed at no charge.

The only downside to leaving it alone is having to do what you did to get things together.

As for smoothing up a new 870, just run a few thousand rounds through it.

Use a crock stick, hard Arkansas stone or similar to polish the wear marks, remove flashing on the action bars and slightly radius them. This will speed up the break in process.

Then, run a few thousand rounds through it....

TheKlawMan
April 26, 2012, 05:49 PM
To R&R the FE, some use needle nose pliars and some of them are sorry for it. You can buy a wrench for anywhere in between $17 and $45 or do what I did. I am not sure of the name of the part, but take the sled that the bolt sits on. One end will fit so as to allow you to remove the FE nut. You may have to grap the sled with locking pliars.

If you R&R the FE it is important to line it up so that neither side of the receiver is hit, even so slightly, when the action is worked. If you don't allow sufficient clearance you could soon wear the finish off of the receiver, especially as there is a tendency to slightly rotate the FE aboutt he axis of the magazine as it is worked (twist it).

jmr40
April 26, 2012, 07:41 PM
I've changed a couple of forends. Granted it would be easier with a special tool, but I was too cheap and didn't want to wait a few days for the USPS to deliver.

Use penetrating oil on the threads. I've used the needle nose pliers on one that was not too tight. A punch set in one of the notches and tapped lightly with a hammer got a difficult one to move. It is more time comsuming without special tools, but was 2-3 days faster than waiting on a tool that had to be ordered. If I planned on doing several either buying or fabricaing one like BHP9 did would be a good idea. But it is possible with no special tools and a little patience.