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Tatsumi67
January 3, 2008, 02:52 PM
This may be better suited for the pistol forums, but I have been curious about these "shot shell" rounds for pistols and rifles, instead of firing a slug it propels small shot (#9 if my memory is correct) and I believe they are manufactured by CCI. Does anyone have any experience with these rounds? how do they perform?:confused:

http://www.northwestloading.com/catalog/images/CCI%20shotshell%202.JPG

Doyle
January 3, 2008, 04:13 PM
They basically have 2 uses - snakes and rats. Range is VERY limited - even in .44. Useful range is somewhere between 2 ft and maybe up to 10 ft. I keep the first two cylinders in my .357 loaded with them when I'm hunting. I hate snakes.

The .22LR versions are totally useless (except maybe for sitting inside the barn and having fun with the rats eating the horse feed). I used a .22mag for a while and managed to kill one cottonmouth with it at about 6 ft but I wouldn't want to count on it to save me. Both of those rounds us #12 shot.

The .38 and .44 versions use #9 shot. That gives you a little better chance of penetrating a big snakes head.

davlandrum
January 3, 2008, 04:40 PM
Someone posted a nice report on these somewhere on this forum. I did a quick search in the handgun forum, but didn't see it right off. If I wasn't at work, I would look some more.

Tatsumi67
January 3, 2008, 05:55 PM
I actually new about the purpose of it (its self explanitory), my question was how do they perform? can they be used in a rifled handgun barrel (i would suppose so) are they reliable?

ebutler462
January 3, 2008, 07:15 PM
I use them in my Taurus 85 38. It is a rifled handgun. The plastic sleeve protects the rifling. I used them a lot during my law enforcement career to kill snakes with. They didn't seem to be a problem in rifled guns.

I keep my Taurus loaded with them all summer. I'd hate to be shot in the eyes with them. They are very effective up to about 5 yards on snakes and rats.

BigJimP
January 3, 2008, 07:33 PM
They perform real well - in .357 mag or .44 mag revolvers with 6" or 8 3/8" barrels ( S&W were my guns).

I used to carry them a lot in 2 cyclinders / the other 4 cyclinders with typical ammo -when I was hiking or camping in snake country.

EHCRain10
January 3, 2008, 11:45 PM
ive used the 22LR out of a Marlin 39A to chase off a hunting dog that had just killed one of my sisters cats

the dog was about 15 yards off when i fired but still knew that he wasnt welcome around the house anymore

might be just the thing to prevent dog attacks, but still be prepared with solids if they dont work in the same way mine did

they're also available in 9mm and 45acp for the autoloader fans out there

Ruger4570
January 4, 2008, 12:19 AM
I tried a few of the shot shells at some time in my life. Performance wise, they leave a LOT to be desired. The rifling tends to form a pattern in circular clusters outside the point of aim with the center very sparce. My brother does use then to control rats in his chicken coop, but he needs a clear shot at the rats to kill them. Pennetration is next to none.

GunnNutt
January 11, 2008, 09:07 PM
I've used them in a 5.5" .45LC SA revolver. The LC version holds a lot of the #9, but effective range really is limited to a few yards. I think they could benefit greatly from additional velocity, and maybe from #8 shot, but there is probably a pattern-quality issue with the plastic cup, etc. CCI claims the cups pattern much better than the crimped versions that used to be available.

I guess the best snake medicine is a .410 field load from a Judge revolver or a NEF/Pardner Snakecharmer shotgun.

DPris
January 11, 2008, 09:47 PM
Nope, actually velocity is their enemy.
When I tested the things in about 20 guns a while back, I found that velocity increases the dispersion rate. It causes the already rotating shot column (from the rifling) to spin faster, and centrifugal force opens up the column more rapidly.
Faster rifling twist and longer barrels tended to produce larger patterns than slower twists and short barrels.
Denis