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ISC
December 20, 2007, 11:48 PM
Every time I go to the range, I try to do at least a couple iterations where I'll engage target from different positions after doing some calesthenics to simulate stress and fatigue. Nothing crazy, just 40 or 50 pushups or a set of knee benders and lunges before shooting from the standing and kneeling positions.

I'll also work on doing transitions from standing to kneeling and reloading and malf drills.

Pretty basic stuff for anyone that is more than a casual shooter I think, but I still get dirty looks alot of times and find myself trying to defuse them by explaining that I'm in the military or trying to wait until the range is somewhat clear.

When I do this I usually get a couple comments that range from "that's a good idea" to disapproving glares from the hunter snob who is waiting 10 minutes between shots for the barrel to cool completely.

The local dick that runs the range here in town has commented about it before, and the G&FC dick that was supervising the public range in Lake City actually told me to stop doing double taps or any other "rapid firing"

What other drills/exercises/techniques do you use to train, and how do you deal with suspicious looks and comments from the less serious shooters?

pjn003
December 20, 2007, 11:59 PM
not going to lie, if i saw that at my range i would probably start laughing :D

doesn't mean that its not a good idea, by any means, just that it is certainly not within the normal social behavior of a gun range and there is nothing you can do to make people stop looking at you funny.

smithrob75
December 21, 2007, 12:09 AM
I get strange looks when I shoot full auto at the range. Most people believe full auto's are illegal so they don't know what to think. I just smile and blast off another 30 rounds. I kinda think it's funny when people stare. You should have seen them when I dumped a beta-c..

ISC
December 21, 2007, 12:23 AM
It makes a big difference when you have to actually run before or between shoots instead of sitting in a tree stand and waiting for dinner to walk up to the carrots you planted. I know it helped me in the last competition I did, and I hope it is useful when I get deployed next year.

timothy75
December 21, 2007, 12:37 AM
I can see that being a problem, heres my advice. Get an airsoft gun and move some furniture around, then get as crazy as you want to in the privacy of your own home. I'd also search high and low for a piece of public or private land you could at alone. Even if you had to drive two hours once a month to get to it it would be worthwile if you really want to experiment with different tactics. Good luck

ISC
December 21, 2007, 01:02 AM
I guess my take is that I don't have a problem, they're the ones with the problem. When I do it I get off the firing line. I run in public and work out at the park so I am not that self conscious about it. I think that if you've never actually tried to do any type of stressed shooting you will be at a severe disadvantage if/when you need to. just range walking a couple hundred meters with a Kpot and web gear can through some pogues off, I can only imagine what moving from cover to cover and then shooting would do to some of the slugs that post on the internet about their fantasies but never actually do practical exercises.

I was hoping to get an "amen brother" and some ideas about other exercises and stuff to work into my training program. I've thought about carrying a peice of pipe or a weighted axe handle when I run to simulate carrying my rifle, but that's not that big of a concern for me.

animal
December 21, 2007, 01:19 AM
snicker.. snort ..snicker ..ahem .. sorry :D

tried chamomile tea before rifle shooting, tasted funky and didn’t notice any benefit.
12 oz. curls after shooting is good

It’s a free country … as long as the range officials have no problem with it.
Rapid fire : This is and should be up to the range. It’s their property after all and some people are downright dangerous. The range I go to is ok with pretty much any technique or eccentricity as long as you handle the gun safely. They observe and size up the individual. Another I went to limited full autos to certain days. Their property and they set the rules. I suggest that you ask officials in advance if you want to do anything out of the ordinary.

Ever think of getting involved in action pistol shooting? It is fun and might be up your alley. OR use it as an excuse ... "I need to do this stuff to get prepared for an action pistol match" ... It may keep the fat guys from snickering at you.

The Tourist
December 21, 2007, 02:21 AM
I think it's a great idea.

Actor Michael Chillis (The Shield) used to have a show called "The Commish."

One episode demonstrated the poor performance of a real shoot-out with the near perfect range scores of the officers involved.

So, the next day, the Commish makes his officers run, climb stairs, sweat, etc. and then shoot. He's surprised how stress effects their scores.

So do it. Let people laugh. Dance around. Shoot weak hand.

Some day it might help you.

Axion
December 21, 2007, 02:23 AM
I'd look at you funny.

Same way I look at people funny when they start C-walking in the gym.

oldbillthundercheif
December 21, 2007, 02:49 AM
I get creative every once in a while, but usually while the range is empty except for myself and a friend or two. There have been exceptions, though.

One time I was doing transitions from offhand shooting to a kneeling position behind a 55gal drum ("cover") and a young lady cop came over from the other side of the range and pretty much insisted I teach her to shoot from positions. I did my best and we had a great time while the other cops gave us dirty looks and made fun of us. That was a very entertaining day at the range, who cares if people look at you strangely?

2cooltoolz
December 21, 2007, 03:04 AM
Do you ever pop off a few rounds at the gym?? Knock out a couple of sit ups at the grocery?? Are you the guy at the range with the cut up T-shirt? Seems kinda needy to me...sorry.

IdaReggaeMon
December 21, 2007, 03:22 AM
It makes a big difference when you have to actually run before or between shoots instead of sitting in a tree stand and waiting for dinner to walk up to the carrots you planted. I know it helped me in the last competition I did, and I hope it is useful when I get deployed next year.

This is what is done in Biathalon: alternate periods of intense cross country skiing with target shooting. You have to be in REALLY good shape to not have your heart rate and breathing interfere with your shooting. Check into interval training. It sounds appropriate for your interests.

As long as you're being safe and not breaking any range rules, I say more power to you. Most people I see at the range couldn't run in from the parking lot if their lives depended on it.

Casimer
December 21, 2007, 03:49 AM
You've got to recognize that for every guy who's competent to perform these sorts of drills, there are 20 more who'll claim they are but can't w/o posing a risk to other people. So yeah, I'd probably keep an eye on you. I can appreciate what you're trying to accomplish, but a range intended for the general public probably isn't the best place to do it.

animal
December 21, 2007, 04:44 AM
I guess my take is that I don't have a problem, they're the ones with the problem.
As far as snickers and dirty looks go, you are correct sir.

When it comes to range rules and officials, remember that you are a guest at the facility. If it’s not covered by the rules, asking politely first usually will get a favorable response. If they say "no" respect it. Make friends with the officials by being polite and demonstrating competence. You wouldn’t believe how far this will get you.

Seriously, your idea of simulating stress responses and learning to compensate is sound.
Personally, I prefer techniques to control my stress responses.

Silvanus
December 21, 2007, 05:08 AM
It’s a free country … as long as the range officials have no problem with it.
Rapid fire : This is and should be up to the range. It’s their property after all and some people are downright dangerous.

Indeed...There are SEVEN holes in the roof of the firing range I go to (in the handgun part). The ROs usually let me do what I want, because they know me and I can shoot. But I would not be surprised if they introduced a "1 shot-a-second" rule.

Regarding the funny looks, I would keep doing whatever you want to. If you think it could be helpful some day, why stop it now? The people who laugh are probably (like you said) snobbish hunters/target shooters (I mean no offence, but I've had bad experiences with that kind myself) or armchair commando ex-navy SEAL marine snipers who can't hit the target at 10 meters when they've had to climb a few stairs before shooting.

I can appreciate what you're trying to accomplish, but a range intended for the general public probably isn't the best place to do it.

Why is that? In the OP he doesn't mention anything that's dangerous really. Doing some pushup before shooting. His hand is probably not as steady, but that's it. Changing between standing and kneeling, malfunction drills, ect. nothing dangerous IMO.

Tanzer
December 21, 2007, 07:37 AM
While it would get a second look from me, I figure you can do what you wish as long as it's safe and not interfering with anyone. You aren't doing this at the firing line, are you?
I'm the type who'd probably ask you why you were doing it, and a reaonable answer would satisfy me. If you said: " 'Cuz it zones me, man! Those targets are dust, man"! or something weird like that, now I'd be wondering. My kids shoot 3 position, and complain of cramps and twitching, especially when kneeling, so I can understand your reasoning. The .22 pistol league guys do upper body stuff (though not at the range) for similar reasons.
Hey, I see guys who sit in chairs and clamp thier pistols to the bench (not just sighting in). I don't see much point in that, but to each his own, right?

hogdogs
December 21, 2007, 08:48 AM
I have never done that at a range but in my younger days I had a 5 acre place and would put paper plates on a gob of trees and than would go back to the house, get my firearm and sprint the 100 yards to the woods edge and begin working my "course" from different angles and positions. I did get watched once and asked what that was all about... I just said I was practicing...
Brent

DMK
December 21, 2007, 08:49 AM
Do you ever pop off a few rounds at the gym?? Knock out a couple of sit ups at the grocery?? Are you the guy at the range with the cut up T-shirt? Seems kinda needy to me...sorry.From everything I've read by professionals, it times of stress (like someone mugging or carjacking you) you won't have much time to think and will fall back on your training. If your training is unrealistic and consists of sitting on a bench with your elbows on the table, slow firing at targets 25 yards away, then you could have problems.

Of course, you could just adopt the mindset of 90% of the folks out there and assume that "it won't happen to me because we live in a civilized society". Chances are you'd be right, but sometimes stuff happens to folks anyway.

Kentucky Deer Hunter
December 21, 2007, 09:15 AM
It makes a big difference when you have to actually run before or between shoots instead of sitting in a tree stand and waiting for dinner to walk up to the carrots you planted.

:barf:

ISC - Did you really have to bash hunters? Not all hunters are lazy and "non-shooters". That statement was a little too broad in my opinion.:rolleyes:

I enjoy shooting and scenario practice as much as I do hunting.;)

ragwd
December 21, 2007, 11:14 AM
At the range that I haunt, there is about a half mile driveway, I have ran that a few times to get my heart rate up to about 150 then I shot at a target at same distance (25yds) that I normally use. The result was my pattern opened up by a whole lot, I was still on paper but all over it. I think its a great thing to try once to show yourself the effects of elevated heart rate but at a typical range I wouldn't do that often. Best probably at a range set up and designed for tactical practice rather than accuracy. Just not enough of those ranges around.

PPGMD
December 21, 2007, 11:44 AM
I get dirty looks when I do a mag dump at the outdoor range that I shoot at.

ATW525
December 21, 2007, 12:38 PM
Indeed...There are SEVEN holes in the roof of the firing range I go to

There's only seven? :eek:

Mr. James
December 21, 2007, 12:57 PM
I was hoping to get an "amen brother" and some ideas about other exercises and stuff to work into my training program.

Oh, stop it, yer killin' me . . .

Nytelyte
December 21, 2007, 01:15 PM
I think its a good idea. I do it relatively frequently. But my club is a private club, i'm usually about the only person there, or I know the others.

I think if you are no breaking any rules, interfering with anyone, and the RO is ok with it, then do your thing. You're a paying customer, using the facility inside of its rules to for your purposes. Who cares what others think. If we all did no one would be shooters.
Its good practice, if you've never tried it, you'd probably be surprised how much an elevated heart rate or a bit of adrenaline will do to your groups.

Go for it, man.

CrazyIvan007
December 21, 2007, 01:27 PM
What other drills/exercises/techniques do you use to train, and how do you deal with suspicious looks and comments from the less serious shooters?

Look them straight in the eye and say:

"Nothing to worry about. I do this before sex too."

Mannlicher
December 21, 2007, 01:28 PM
when I shoot up at the Osceola range in lake city, I often run and then shoot, to practice breathing and muscle control. In a time of great social unrest, the confrontations might well be like that, where you have to run to cover, then fight.

Avenger11
December 21, 2007, 07:20 PM
If you did that at my range, I'd find cover and call 911! Random gyrations like that at a range in Texas could get you either arrested or labeled as one of those "Tip toe thru the tulips" type guys.
Merry Christmas to all.:D

sethmark
December 21, 2007, 08:27 PM
I might remind those over stress dumbasses that this is america and if you want to swing from the rafters screaming jodies, that's your right.

Avenger11
December 21, 2007, 08:36 PM
OOOKAY! Can we not resort to name calling from the rafters!!

Harrigan
December 21, 2007, 08:47 PM
Sounds like good excersise to me,as long as you practice safe shooting 1st.

NetJnkie
December 21, 2007, 10:22 PM
Two suggestions:

1. Try competition shooting like USPSA/IPSC or IDPA. It's not uncommon to sprint through a stage and have to shot with your heart rate way up. Plus, that timer adds more stress than you'd think.

2. Try to find a private range. I'm a member of a range here with a private indoor pistol range. During the week at night (it's open 24 hours) I have the place to my self. I doubt most ranges would let me turn off all the lights and practice shooting by tac light.... but I can do it there.

ISC
December 21, 2007, 10:49 PM
wow, this thread really took off.

I can't say that I'm surprised at the derision that some of the responses displayed. I guess I'm taking this stuff seriously because I'm deploying to Afghanistan in 2009 for a combat mission and that's a good motivator. When my unit shoots at the range it is always from a foxhole and prone position. We just recently added the kneeling position to qualification. It was long overdue.

We never shoot pistols because only officers and 240 gunners are issued the M9 and ammo isn't provided for training on non issued weapons. That means that the typical company only gets a few hundred rounds to shoot per year. I will be getting a pistol when I'm over there even if I have to get it in theater and leave it behind when I come home. It's up to me to be prepared to use it.

I do the transition drills I was discussing on the firing line, but do the exercises behind the line.

I am a 11B staff sergeant with over 10 years time in service I have a firearm collection that's bigger and better than most gunshops' inventory. I have competed in local and national competitions and always qualified expert with every weapon I've ever shot for record (SAW, M16, M9, SIG P226).

I only say this to illustrate that I'm not doing this stuff on a lark or that I'm the sort of kid that plays with airsoft and buys throwing stars and big fake knifes and thinks he's a ninja.

I am a warrior and train for war.

I didn't mean to offend any hunters, I hunt too, just not very often or well. I was just trying to show that shooting a deer is a different skill set and mindset than killing a man, and it has implications that many here never seriously consider.

If you haven't done any sort of stressed shooting you have no idea how much that complicates things. It can only be prepared for by training for it. I offered up my method of training for it and asked for other's input. Some of the responses were contemptable.

ssilicon
December 22, 2007, 11:51 AM
I don't exercise at the shooting range. I shoot. I would also probably give someone exercising at the range a strange look, but I wouldn't have anything against such a person.

I can see it now.... "Shootin' to the Oldies"

Denny Hansen
December 22, 2007, 12:30 PM
ISC-
First and above all, a sincere thank you for your service to our country.

If I saw someone exercising at the range I would assume they are doing it for the exact reason you described. Run it by the owner of the range and tell him why your reasoning. Most range owners I know would give you a green light as long as you are being safe. As for others present giving you strange looks? Ignore them.

Denny

capbuster
December 22, 2007, 12:54 PM
A long way back I did some flexing at the range to limber up and proceeded to knock my spotting scope off the bench. No harm done, but I have not repeated the practice.

KS.45
December 22, 2007, 09:38 PM
I have an exercise pad that I go prone or kneel on. Any tactical movement will appear odd to some range shooters. The best idea is as previously posted. Find a landowner who has a good area for shooting. You can set up however you want and move the same. As long as you have a good backstop, go for it!

DON'T LEAVE TRASH BEHIND!!

Capt Charlie
December 23, 2007, 12:34 AM
I am surprised that Captain Charlie has not shut this one down. Come on, exercising at the range???
I admit that I kinda cocked an eyebrow at the "strange looks" part of this, but the idea of training under physical stress is a viable one. I know of some courses of fire that require the shooter to start at the 100 yard line, run to the twenty five, engage, then run to the fifteen and engage multiple targets.

There is a world of difference between shooting in a calm, relaxed condition and shooting while breathing hard with a pulse rate of 120 or more.

Carry on.

OnTheFly
December 23, 2007, 12:35 AM
I get some similar funny looks at the range. What I do is bring a pillow, blanket, and cot. I set them up about 20 yards from the firing line. I place my firearm under the pillow, strip down to my tighty-whiteys (unless it's summer when I normally sleep in the buff), and then lay down in my typical (fetal) sleeping position. I pretend that I hear a noise in my house, I jump up, grab my firearm, and run to the firing line. Sometimes that gets some funny looks...or kicked off the range if it's in the summer time. :D

In all seriousness ISC, whatever keeps you alive. If I KNEW I was headed to some serious combat, then your method sure sounds like good training to me.

Thanks for serving your country.

Fly

ISC
December 23, 2007, 02:23 PM
The EIC matchs we shot a couple months ago had us running over 100 M for several of the different shoots. One had us climbing stairs to take positions in a window shooting down into a depression at targets at unknown ranges. I completely blew that one, but I think the biggest problem was shooting at targets at unknown ranges and elevations.

The Patton match was a sprint (200 M I think) followed by a pistol shoot, but we had time to catch our breath after the sprint, so the bigger issue was general physical condition than stressed shooting. By that I mean being in good shape allows your heart rate to return to a normal number in a few minutes after the sprint, which is a different issue than training to shoot while your heart rate is high. The first you can train for at the gym, but shooting with a high heart rate needs to be trained for at a range.

Most shooters without real training have a Bunker hill mentality and envision any action they might see as being where they will hunker down behind cover and take slow aimed shots at an adversary approaching over open ground. They don't have any idea of the elements of manuever and tactical movement that are required to be effective as part of a team or small unit.

Some readers here agree with what I'm saying and see the sense in it.

There is also a sizable percentage of the members here who have no idea about the requirements to be effective in a fluid battlefield. The percentage that doesn't have the physical abilities is even larger, and the percentage that doesn't have the training is even larger than that.

There are some guys that have the knowledge but not the physical abilities. Mostly that's because they got injured, old, or fat. That's life. Do the best you can to get in the best shape you can.

There are some guys that have the athletic abilities but not the knowledge. Find one of the guys described above and train.

Then there are the guys that are content "knowing" that they'll never have to take a shot at another human being, or if they ever do it will be zombie hordes that can be picked off at long range until you run out of ammo, and anyone who prepares by tactival shooting is unrealistic.

kgpcr
December 23, 2007, 08:44 PM
Since i am no longer active duty in the Corps i dont think i will have a need to shoot with a high pulse. I dont see a reason to practice it. and Charlie you are so very right about shooting with a high pulse and being out of breath! Its unreal the affect it has on ones shooting.

allenomics
December 23, 2007, 09:33 PM
If you did this in front of others at the indoor range I frequent, you would probably be stopped and questioned.

The range can be a dangerous place, and anything that is perceived to be strange, would make a lot of people nervous.

I'm not saying anything negative about you. I don't even know you.

I think many of us have heard stories about violence, sometimes shooter-self-inflicted at ranges where others are potential victims.

If I we you I'd brief the range master about your intensions and ask permission first.

ISC
December 25, 2007, 06:07 AM
At the range I belong to, anyone can be the range master. We have a orange vest that hangs on the line and whoever is there first is the rangemaster.

There is a range caretaker who is basically a pudgy self important security guard on some sort of power trip, and he tends to hassle anyone that happens to be around, regardless of what they're doing.

Membership is $200/year, I think fo that I deserve to get some training value for my range time.

Avenger11
December 26, 2007, 05:56 PM
I have an orange hunting vest. Can I be RANGEMASTER. PLEASE!!!!!!

johnnymenudo
December 27, 2007, 01:17 PM
You claim not to be a mall ninja or a kid playing airsoft, yet you come to a public firearm forum looking for approval from a bunch of strangers regarding your training regimen.

If you are being deployed in 2008, work on your PT at a gym and work on your shooting at a range. You will get plenty of chance to integrate the two with a group of professionals in an appropriate environment. If you absolutely cannot stand to wait, try to do it when the place is empty. Why draw attention to yourself? If you insist on following your training regimen, then go ahead and do it but don't be surprised if you are treated like a jerk. You paid for the range membership, as long as you don't violate the rules, then do whatever makes you happiest.

jhansman
December 27, 2007, 02:01 PM
I stretch my back, legs, arms and hands before any range session. I learned long ago that an unstretched body performs more poorly than a stretched one in almost every activity where precision is required. Yes, I get some strange looks, but I just ignore the lookers.

musher
December 27, 2007, 02:04 PM
You claim not to be a mall ninja or a kid playing airsoft, yet you come to a public firearm forum looking for approval from a bunch of strangers regarding your training regim

I don't remember him asking for approval. He asked for advice for addressing the discomfort other shooters sometimes showed with his program, and he asked what other stress simulation techniques folks here used. Seems like a gun forum is a good place to ask both questions.

I'd take a hard look at someone who was doing such a program at the range, but my concern would be limited to making sure the safety rules were being followed (muzzle control esp). As long as I thought the routine was safe, I'd either ignore it or continue to watch to see if I could learn something.

I've done similar exercises to simulate stress, but never at a public range. I'm lucky in that we have a lot of empty land here where you can go shoot by yourself. If you can find a shooting spot on a hill, you can try hill sprints to the firing point combined with a timed exercise on the targets.

TexasSeaRay
December 27, 2007, 02:28 PM
I was hoping to get an "amen brother" and some ideas about other exercises and stuff to work into my training program. I've thought about carrying a peice of pipe or a weighted axe handle when I run to simulate carrying my rifle, but that's not that big of a concern for me.

As an old vet who's been there and done that as well as done a lot of action competition shooting, I think you're both over-doing it and I think you need to step back and re-examine your attitude.

There are a lot of ways you can practice precision during physical stress/exhaustion. Try throwing darts. It's eye to hand coordination and try doing that after having whipped out four or five dozen pushups or running in place for fifteen minutes.

You can also dry fire--holding a sight picture when breathing and sweating heavily is a lot different than under relaxed, controlled situations.

Lot of things you can do to reach your goal without annoying or disturbing other shooters.

I'm not in the military anymore. Haven't been in a long while. I respect and appreciate those who are, but if I saw you at my range doing what you describe and if it bothered me or my wife, I'd ask you to tone it down. If you didn't, I'd be raising hell with the owner.

You're in the military. You're there to protect and defend your fellow citizens' rights--not use your service as an excuse to do what you want or train how you want at a general public firing range.

Many ranges I've shot at around the country have areas, bays or stalls that you can get that are either segregated from other shooters or are far enough away that your stress-training will not be a distraction. Try asking the rangemaster to assign you to one of those areas.

Or, find out when the range is least busy and try to shoot then.

Lot of things someone who's been around as long as a ssgt should know/be able to do to where this isn't an issue.

You stated yourself that you came here "looking for an amen brother." I'll give you an "amen brother" for serving your country and working to be a better shot, but I'm not going to give you an "amen brother" for thinking that because you're taking shooting more serious that somehow you're entitled to disturb or annoy other shooters.

Jeff

johnnymenudo
December 27, 2007, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by musher

I don't remember him asking for approval. He asked for advice for addressing the discomfort other shooters sometimes showed with his program, and he asked what other stress simulation techniques folks here used. Seems like a gun forum is a good place to ask both questions.

I think asking for an "amen brother" is asking for approval, but that's just my take on it. You can certainly learn a lot from the internet including the gun forums, but I find it odd that a "professional warrior" is here looking for information and advice. I would hope that my doctor learns from other doctors and from professional journals and continuing medical education seminars, vs. the "health information" internet forums, but maybe that is just me.

Nothing wrong with limbering up or stretching out before shooting, but doing PT and trying to simulate shooting under stress at a range with general shooting going on is pretty goofy.

Originally Posted by ISC
I was hoping to get an "amen brother" and some ideas about other exercises and stuff to work into my training program. I've thought about carrying a peice of pipe or a weighted axe handle when I run to simulate carrying my rifle, but that's not that big of a concern for me.

TexasSeaRay
December 27, 2007, 03:33 PM
I might remind those over stress dumbasses that this is america and if you want to swing from the rafters screaming jodies, that's your right.

Not in my house it's not.

Jeff

Vermont
December 27, 2007, 03:45 PM
A guy running and doing push ups disturbs people? You'd think the range was a ritzy golf course from the way some of the people in this thread are talking. If you need complete silence and no movement behind you then you are probably doing it wrong, or at least in the wrong place.

ISC, you get an "amen brother" from me. If people want to look at you strange, then let them. They are probably just curious, and not upset by it. If they want to ask you about it, tell them the truth. Or tell them you are training for a biathlon.

Hardtarget
December 27, 2007, 08:02 PM
I have a range set up on my parents small farm. We do some of the same stuff...its just very private for us.

We will load the gun, do ten pushups, then run a hundred yards, ten more pushups, take the gun off the table and do our best...ouch. Seems to really open the groups.

I know its not the same as a :eek: fight for your life situation but its got to help. At least its different form just standing there. We do enough of that, too.

Mark.

parrothead2581
December 27, 2007, 08:23 PM
They're just jealous. Too out of shape to do 5 push ups let alone 50.

If it helps you, more power to you. As long as you aren't putting others in danger, breaking range rules, or committing some unscrupulous act, what you do in you lane is your business. Ignore the stares. If it benefits you in the future you'll be happy you practiced in that manner.

Aqeous
December 27, 2007, 08:52 PM
One simple idea might be bust out a workout before you go. I mean a really good one. And then between shooting sets take a walk and take a jog around the block or something and really push yourself get back and fire off some rounds before your heart rate drops and your breathing slow to much. . . people would probably be more receptive to this kind of activity. Also if you really push yourself you might find it more effective then push-up, sit-up, jogging sets in between your shooting. You'd be simulating worst case scenario fatigue, and if you can get your fatigued groups to match you resting groups you know you're doing well.








oh yea . . . and if all else fails you can stand their on the firing line and use a thymaster, if your going to get dirty looks, why not go all the way . . . :)

ISC
December 27, 2007, 11:38 PM
THE BIG THING I'M TRYING TO DO IS RAISE MY HEART RATE AND BREATHING RATE BEFORE SHOOTING.

If someone would like to make a suggestion about how to accomplish that I'll try it. If youve never tried shooting with you heart pounding and breathing heavy you have no idea how much it affects you. Because of the training I do I hope to be that much better prepared when me and my buddies have our lives at stake.

The guy that made the statement that i'll get all the training in this regard from the army has no idea what he's talking about. The only shoot and move training we get and ever will get is conducted with blanks.

Many of the members at this site don't seem to have a clue about any type of shooting except for punching holes in paper or shooting out of a deer stand.

TexasSeaRay
December 28, 2007, 12:39 AM
Many of the members at this site don't seem to have a clue about any type of shooting except for punching holes in paper or shooting out of a deer stand.

Since you already seem to know most of it, if not all of it, why are you asking us clueless deer-stand, paper-shooters how to raise your highy trained (but as of yet, untested) warrior's heartbeat?

And, you might be surprised at what some of us deer-stand, paper-shooting folks have been through and know how to do in regards to shooting at places other than a gun range.

Jeff

Capt Charlie
December 28, 2007, 12:40 PM
I honestly don't see what's so difficult about this. There are significant differences in ranges. Some encourage training in defensive shooting while others don't understand it at all and restrict shooting to bullseye.

I think the trick here is simply to let both the range master and those shooting near you what you'd like to do and why. Then ask permission. That way, no one will think you're going postal ;).

If you're denied permission or obviously making others uneasy, it's time to move on to another range. Their range, their rules.

That said, I think this one's run its course. Posters seem to be irreversibly polarized and there's little else to be gained from it. On to other things.

Closed.