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Harry Bonar
September 28, 2007, 03:33 PM
Sirs:
I'll be as concise as possible - The 1911 package is not suitable for these modified pistol cartridges.

You are supposed to "drop in" a bbl, use the sights, magazine, and springs with the 400 CORBON? Not so! First, there is no such thing as a "drop in" part - some will "drop in" alright and work but they're not right!
My 400 load was 10 gr. of AA#5 (10.8 max) with 155 gr jackedted bullet, WSP primers and Starline cases and Lee dies.
I replaced the Lee stop collars with standard screw type collars and found it literally impossible to put any crimp, or pressure of any kind on the case without bulging brass at the front sholder not allowing full chambering except with the slide being dropped on a round from the magazine. It would not function as a 45 would.
Recoil was sharp, slide velocity was fast and POI. was 12" high at 25 yds.
After various senarios abd die adjustments the conversion to 400 CORBON experiment was stopped - the 45ACP bbl. went back in and peace returned to my heart - this took place over several weeks and three such attempts.
My personal opinion is the 45ACP and the 19911 package belong together and all attempts should be abandoned to change bbls to high intensity, "special" rounds.
The 1911 package and the 45ACP (like the 12 gua. and 2/34" shells) simply belong together - leave it alone!:D
Harry B.

Hunter Customs
September 29, 2007, 08:34 AM
Hello Harry,
Ken Tapp competed in some of the major pin shoots around the country using the 400 CorBon, I do not recall Ken having any issues with the gun and cartridge.
That being said I don't know if Ken was shooting hand loads of not. When it comes to hand loads for the 400 CorBon I'm of no help, as I've never loaded for that cartridge.
As for your issues with slide speed, a small radius firing pin plate (0.062 radius) and a 25 pound main spring will help in controling slide speed. I've used this set-up many times in 10mm guns set-up for full power 10mm ammo.
What weight recoil spring was you using?
Regards
Bob Hunter
www.huntercustoms.com

WESHOOT2
September 29, 2007, 04:55 PM
I bought a Clark drop-in tube some years back; dropped right in my Caspian (yep, surprised the crap right outta me too).

I load 135g Rainiers over Universal Clays for can't-find-the-ejected-cases-'cause-they-reached-orbital-velocity normal range loads.
I first size the cases with a 45 carbide die then do the 400 thing.

Power Pistol / N350 / Accurate Arms.....

I ain't sellin' it; I like it.
Unbelievable accuracy to boot.
Don't shoot too many matches with it, though.

Harry Bonar
October 1, 2007, 05:59 PM
Thanks guys:
I guess I "just don't feel right with it" - you guys know what I mean?
I do feel that wityh some modifications that you fellas mention the Corbon ought to work great.
I've just got a "funny feeling" about it. :D
Harry B.

azredhawk44
October 1, 2007, 06:29 PM
I've got a Glock 21 I "dropped" a conversion barrel into.

Loading for the 400 is a pain in the rear, but it can be done. Takes a fine touch to the crimp, for sure.

My only complaint with my experiment is the fact that Glock21 + 400corbon + doublestack mags = jammomatic. 13 round magazines were a source of aggravation. 10 rounders seemed to work much better, but still wouldn't give me more than about 95% reliability in feeding. Not good enough for critter protection (my reason for looking into the project in the first place). Ultimately, I got a redhawk in .44 and never looked back.

I haven't shot a round of .400 in about 3-4 years now. 10mm is just a better cartridge. So is .45super. My glock is back to running 45acp. I've been toying with converting my Daly 1911 to .400, but I keep coming back to one question: Why bother?

So... to sum up: The Glock 21 is also unsuitable for the 400corbon conversion.

Maybe the caliber's just a big-fat-loser?

Or maybe I'm a sucker for buying into the 400 fad.:p

hoghunting
October 1, 2007, 11:38 PM
A few years ago, I remember reading an article about the 400 Corbon in an interview with Jeff Cooper. The writer asked Cooper what he thought of the new cartridge and Cooper's response was: "If you take the 400 Corbon and neck it up to a 45, then you got a mighty good cartridge".

RsqVet
October 2, 2007, 07:19 AM
For my money the 400 corbon is loser.

It's a good idea that hapened not to work.

I'd far rather simply have a 1911 in 10mm than monkey with the 400 corbon which offers nothing more.

Alleykat
October 3, 2007, 08:16 AM
I've shot a bunch of .400 Cor-Bon, some of it through a 1911. The problems described by Mr. Bonar are the result of Mr. Bonar's lack of .400 Cor-Bon reloading prowess, not the appropriateness of shooting .400 Cor-Bon through 1911s. ;)

I much prefer 10mm. Much easier and more straighforward reloading techniques.

Scorch
October 3, 2007, 01:10 PM
Harry-
Don't feel too bad. The necked cartridges for use in the 1911 do present some challenges. It's the reason the 32, 38, and 41 caliber necked 45 rounds never really caught on. For folks that can make them work, they just love the extra performance. For folks that can't get them to settle down and behave, they put them down after a while. Basically, if it's too much trouble, stick with what you know works.

InferriCanis
October 4, 2007, 02:36 AM
Anyone disenchanted after buying a .400 corbon, if its not been mod-ified, let me know how much you will sell it for. I myself like this little round. As a rule, I go with a heavier recoil spring.

Harry Bonar
October 5, 2007, 07:03 PM
Guys:
I know there are all kinds of opinions on it but I will side with Jeff Cooper!
My reloading is complicated by Lee dies. I do think the short neck and seating are critical on the 400. The gentleman may have a point though I've reloaded for 50 years.
Harry B.

Alleykat
October 8, 2007, 05:26 PM
Actually, Harry, I think I probably agree with your overall evaluation of the .400 Cor-Bon. Your reference to the short neck was right-on. .400 Cor-Bon is more difficult to reload properly than is straightwalled ammo. There's also a very real danger of feedramp-induced setback, too, due to the very small bearing area of the very short neck.

As Tony Rumore has posted, the .40 Super, with more case capacity and a longer neck, is substantially superior to the .400 Cor-Bon.

Although I've loaded a bunch of .400 Cor-Bon and .40 Super successfully, I'd recommend 10mm as a superior round, any day!

Harry Bonar
October 8, 2007, 07:21 PM
Sirs:
I noticed what you say on feed ramp set back - can increase pressures tremendously!
I'm sure many fellas can do it but I just think the standard 10 MM is much better - I liked my Glock 20 - but it is gone!
I cannot see how you could get a good roll-crimp on this round without bulging the case. Actually I feel it's redundant to use this case rather than just build a 10 MM.
And then, to my mind - there is the KING of combat pistols the 45ACP!
One night I had a run in with some professional drug dealers. Problems ensued - I got my BHP 9MM on - went outside - didn't feel right at all - the same with the 40 Short and Weak and then finally went back in got my 1911 45 - I felt completey relaxed and ready. Had he come he would have died very quickly!
Harry B.

Alleykat
October 11, 2007, 08:13 AM
Harry, you can't get a good roll crimp on .400 Cor-Bon, unless you're using cannelured bullets. I use an RCBS seater/crimp die that does roll crimp, and I use the Corbin hand-canneluring machine for canneluring the bullets. Really a lot of trouble to go to for a round that's anemic, compared to full-power 10mm!

The Lee die won't roll-crimp .400 Cor-Bon!

azredhawk44
October 12, 2007, 09:07 AM
+1, Alleykat.

I have yet to lay hands on a pre-cannelured 10mm bullet. I'll admit I haven't tried an exhaustive array, but the various lead offering's I've tried in the past suffer from excessive lead shavings (you can't put any bell on the case mouth to prevent this, otherwise you screw up your neck tension), and the jacketed offerings from Hornady and others exclude a cannelure.

I could probably be persuaded to warm up the RCBS .400 dies again if someone actually produced a cannelured, jacketed 180gr softpoint flatnose.:cool:

Or, I'd just stick with 45acp for the bottom feeders and 357/44 for the wheelguns.:p

Alleykat
October 16, 2007, 02:33 PM
1, Alleykat.

I have yet to lay hands on a pre-cannelured 10mm bullet. I'll admit I haven't tried an exhaustive array, but the various lead offering's I've tried in the past suffer from excessive lead shavings (you can't put any bell on the case mouth to prevent this, otherwise you screw up your neck tension), and the jacketed offerings from Hornady and others exclude a cannelure.

I could probably be persuaded to warm up the RCBS .400 dies again if someone actually produced a cannelured, jacketed 180gr softpoint flatnose.

Or, I'd just stick with 45acp for the bottom feeders and 357/44 for the wheelguns.

If you really want to use cannelured bullets for .400 Cor-Bon, I'd not hesitate to recommend the Corbin tool. It was around $60, the last time I checked, which was a few years ago. Canneluring the bullets isn't too tedious, as you can cannelure a bullet about every two seconds. However, it is ONE MORE THING to do! :)