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View Full Version : Remington Model 710 .270 win


cosmolinelover
August 20, 2007, 06:32 PM
So I picked up a Remington Model 710 in .270 winchester this weekend
at a gun show. The bolt felt a little stiff but with only a 60 degree throw
I figured I could live with it.

I know this is kind of a "value" "cheap" "low-end" model, but I got
the price down to $300 new plus some other goodies and I decided
to go for it. So yesterday I spent some time loading up some loads
for it, I'm gonna try some 90 grainers as well as some 130 grainers
to start with and see what I get outta her.

But I decided for fun I'd just chamber a round and see how the action
cycled and I found myself fighting to get the bolt down and lock
the chamber with a round in it. It will close, but it takes a tremendous
amount of force to do so. More than any other bolt gun I own or have
ever fired.

Anyone have any experience with the same problem? Or any
advice?

TheShootist1894
August 20, 2007, 06:35 PM
Hows the bullet seating in the casing, long or short?

FirstFreedom
August 20, 2007, 06:45 PM
-Are these factory rounds or reloads?

-Was the rifle new or used? If used, you might want to check headspace, though I'd imagine it couldn't be too bad, absent a factory flaw, which is very unlikely. Kinda weird; try it with a few other ammo types before taking to a gunsmith.

-What other goodies did you get?

cosmolinelover
August 20, 2007, 08:41 PM
Ok, well I tried both handloaded rounds and factory rounds.
The bullet is seated short in all the cases I loaded, the 90gr and
130gr. The 130 obviously sticks out a lot longer but it is
seated about as deep as the 90gr.

For factory loads I only had a box of Remington 100 gr soft points
but they produced the same result.

The rifle was new in box, so I"d like to think headspacing wouldn't
be an issue, but its always possible I guess.

For other goodies I got a 3-9 x 40 Bushnell scope, its nothing special
but the glass seems clear at least, and nice little mil-dot reference
chart I can carry in my pocket (no the scope is not a mil-dot :rolleyes:).

I went to the show intent on ONLY purchasing a saiga-12 if I came
across one or a Para Ordnance P18 9mm and I ended up with a
.270.... go figure...

cosmolinelover
August 20, 2007, 08:44 PM
Oh yeah... for those that might remember... I posted pics a while back
of my new RRA VArmint A4 20" and RPK I picked up and promised a
range report.... it just hasn't happened yet. I still need to purchase
some good class for the gun and need to stop buying more toys
before I test out the last ones.

So.... its coming sooner or later......

Art Eatman
August 21, 2007, 08:33 AM
If the bolt-closure is difficult with factory-new brass, I'd darned sure get the headspace checked.

Art

Kentucky Deer Hunter
August 21, 2007, 09:05 AM
This is a common problem in most of the Remington 710 models. My 2 brothers and brother-in-law all have that same rifle. (2 .30-06s and 1 .270). After messing with the bolt several times on all 3 guns, the action was very stiff and it required a lot of work to cycle it. After I looked at the guns, I decided to buy something else.

That being said, it is surprisingly an accurate gun. My younger brother can shoot a tight group at 200 yards. He is using the Remington Core-Lokt ammo. It is a great budget gun, and they have all taken deer with them. I like the idea of having a throw around gun if you were going hunting somewhere were it is really nasty or to be scratched, etc... (I can't think of any places, but it sounded good in my head)

Not to hurt your feelings, but my brother purchased the Remington 710 NIB for $289.00 with a Bushnell scope. (They are factory standard 3-9x40)

cosmolinelover
August 21, 2007, 08:20 PM
Thanks for the info guys. I'm debating whether to just get rid of this
thing now or at least see if its got some hidden redeeming qualities.
And yeah, 289 kinda hurt my feelings Kentucky. :p

DaddyMack
August 21, 2007, 08:49 PM
Fellas,

Thanks for the replies. I've attached a couple of pix for reference. Here's the next course of action.

1. I'm going shooting this weekend (I hope) and will see if I just having a bad day before...doubtful, 'cause I was dead center on a couple of other iron sight rifles we were shooting that day. But, one thing I've learned...I'm never always perfect.

2. Check with some other gun-savvy bro's here local and see if there is something mechanically amiss that I can't see.

3. I'll adjust my sight allignment (the way I'm using the sight). I think there may be something to this line...as ashamed as I am to admit it. I was lining up the way I was taught, and I think that I may be too far "down" on the rear sight.

Will let y'all know how it turns out.

mack

PS...just 'cuz we learn something new every day. I have a friend who is a professional big game hunter and guide. He's been shootin' longer than I've been alive (and that's sayin' something...about him, not me). He had a rifle that shot way left. Tried everything he could think of to fix it. Ended up taking it to a smith who zeroed up the gun by doing some fancy drilling at the end of the barrell. I can't explain it, but it straightened that gun out. I don't think that's something I need to pursue, but mentioned it...well, really 'cause this seems to be the kind of place that folks are interested in that sort of thing.

DaddyMack
August 21, 2007, 08:51 PM
I'm an idiot...posted this in the wrong thread.

mack

Yithian
August 22, 2007, 12:08 AM
Welcome to your new 710. Remington's attempt at a fast, easy buck.

The inside of your receiver is plastic.
It's plastic all the way up to the barrel.
Once the lugs on the bolt are being turned, that is when it becomes metal on metal for the first time.
That is the resistance you are feeling in its closing....
The jump from the plastic receiver to the metal barrel has a 'hick-up' in it.

Remington has already gotten so much grief over the 710 that they no longer make it.
Now they make something new, called the 770.
Its so different from the 710 that they had to add 60 'whatevers' to the name.

What is different about it besides the number?
No-one knows.

Whatever you do, do not rely on a possible follow-up shot.
In a few years, a single shot New England will be easier and faster to reload than your 710.

It is because I am forced to sell these hunks of junk that I will never own any Remington.
Browning's may cost twice the 710's, but at least they are still concerned about quality over the easy dollar.

BTW.
Those 710 rifles are for sale at Walmart for $284.
Even less if you find one of the stores that has them on clearance.
We have one 710 left at $225. A 30-06.
The caliber is probably its reliable lifespan. 30 months and 6 days.

Ifishsum
August 22, 2007, 01:58 AM
So what's your point besides making the guy feel bad? He's already bought it.

I've had one in .30-06 fpr 3+ years and it's shoots quite well actually. I don't really like the feel of the bolt either, but in hunting situations when you're working it fast it's not a big deal. Mine has the same hard closing as described.

It isn't my favorite rifle, but it's been on several successful hunts with me.

rampage841512
August 22, 2007, 03:57 PM
I've got a 710 with the same problem. It sucks, but I've learned to be a bit forceful with it. If I break it, I can afford another, better rifle. I enjoy shooting it, but you get what you pay for.

davlandrum
August 22, 2007, 04:50 PM
It is because I am forced to sell these hunks of junk that I will never own any Remington.


Isn't that like saying because Chevy makes the Aveo, you wouldn't drive a Corvette?

They make them because people buy them. They also make a lot of quality rifles as well, just not as inexpensive...

ZeroJunk
August 22, 2007, 05:05 PM
I'm assuming that it is easy to lock the bolt when there is no round chambered?

A chamber with close to zero headspace is a good thing,as long as it is not so tight that a round cannot be reliably chambered.

FirstFreedom
August 22, 2007, 08:55 PM
I gather that from what Kentucky Deer Hunter and Rampage say, that likely it is safe to shoot, despite the stiffness, 99% chance. If it's REALLY stiff - unnaturally so - then I'd follow Art's advice and not shoot until a gunsmith checked it. If it shoots good for you, then I'd just keep it and enjoy it - great caliber choice.

I'd venture a guess that the 770 is nearly identical, but maybe not. 60 parts better my butt - ha.

Daddymack, lmao - been there, done that. :)