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UniversalFrost
February 28, 2007, 01:39 AM
Ok,

Back on the forum after a short break during which I moved to Arizona (Sierra Vista). Was driving down to Patagonia and Nogales the other day and I saw three seperate herds of antelope with about 15-30 in each herd. They were within 50 yards of the road and didn't seem scared even when I pulled off to the side of the road so my daughter could see. I later checked the maps and this was public land they were on (wanted to make sure they were wild and not somebody's pets) and I never heard of anybody rasing pronghorn antelope before.

Anyway, for those of you that hunt antelope down in the southwest is this normal behavior? Reason I ask is because in Nebraska and South Dakota where I come from you normally can't get within a hundred yards of antelope and they also have smaller herds on average (plus they are a little bigger from what I saw the other day). These suckers were within easy bow or pistol range.

Input on antelope hunting strategies for the southwest is appreciated. Right now I am going to try and put in for a tag and try my luck with bow if I keep seeing them in the same spots.

Art Eatman
February 28, 2007, 08:32 AM
I imagine they're used to cars going by on the highway. For years, right near both Marfa and Alpine, I'd see a buck or two just standing by the fence, counting cars.

If you get out and walk toward them, though, it's a different story...

Art

Desertfox
February 28, 2007, 09:22 AM
I took this pic last fall in Colorado/ almost Wyoming on the laramie river road.

15 yards away. Rolled down the window. Took a pic, Stood up, took a pic, took two steps away from the truck...........Dust Cloud.

http://groups.msn.com/_Secure/0UwAYD!4ajJKPYm6zgb8YtDL5G5xzxLpG0fVPKzOaPbcIBbKrQus4GchTMCmExc7ejXxRdO5sgR8PSKo5HIpl4oWfe8HmIqZOARPbvbJ2NvBPud1rAETiNknybZ!2wbpZ/SpeedGoat.jpg?dc=4675612347812232266

Kreyzhorse
February 28, 2007, 07:00 PM
I hunt a lot of antelope in Wyoming. They don't tend to get freaked out by stopping cars or people so long as you don't get too close. Of course that's in non hunting season. A couple of days into hunting season and if they see a car stop, they are gonzo. Damn odd animals but fun to hunt and pretty tasty too (at least where I hunt they taste pretty good. I've heard a lot of people state that they were the worst game animal to eat :barf: but I think it depends on where the antelope live.)

rem33
February 28, 2007, 07:46 PM
I've heard a lot of people state that they were the worst game animal to eat but I think it depends on where the antelope live.)

I think it is what they have been eating and maybe the time of year. A book I read once By Elmer Keith He though it was the time of year. I don't know but the only Antelope I have shot was in the Pahsimeroi Valley where he lived, or ranch was, and we had to make German sausage etc to be able to eat it. It was without a doubt the gamiest game I have ever tasted.
Fun animals to hunt though and it did make great sausage etc.

We see them near the freeway across southern Idaho on a regular basis. They don't seemed concerned with the cars at all but we don't stop either. I think Kreyzhorse is right. We see them in fields here and some neighboring states where they don't seem to pay much attention at all.

davlandrum
March 3, 2007, 02:20 PM
In Oregon they should be pretty tame - since the odds of drawing a tag are lightly less than winning the lotto twice in consecutive weeks.....

BUSTER51
March 3, 2007, 06:46 PM
I live and hunt in Arizona ,and it is hard to get any where near antilope.when you do get one the meat is gamey tasting .not my favorite meat. if you soak it in salt water for a day and than marinate it in the fridge for 3 days it is passable.:D

Art Eatman
March 3, 2007, 09:02 PM
Nobody seems to know why the taste of antelope meat varies so much. My only hunt gave me some of the best tasting meat of any. And all I did was cook about the same way I do venison, which is mainly just keep it from drying out while cooking.

But, like BUSTER51 said, sometimes it's rank. Maybe it varies some with what they eat at some particular time. I know that some deer around the Uvalde area of Texas will have a tang of guajilla brush when they've been eating it.

But, you can easily tell when you do your butchering if you're gonna have to play games with it...

Art

UniversalFrost
March 3, 2007, 09:18 PM
A couple of years ago my brother and I both bagged antelope within seconds of each other from the same herd in south dakota. Both were nice bucks and mine tasted slightly gamey while the one my brother shot had no gamey taste. I think it has a lot to do with what the antelope have to eat and what they prefer. Some may prefer the grasses while some may prefer to eat the sage and cedar berries or acorns, etc.. same in deer and in people. We all need to eat, but we prefer different types of food.

Remeber you are what you eat and this translates into how you taste if you were eaten. :barf:

I will let you all know how the arizona antelope taste and compare to the Bigger south dakota and nebraska antelope I have previously shot and ate. :)

Paul B.
March 5, 2007, 05:34 PM
Well, if you have a very close relationship with God and He's in the mood to let you draw a tag, then you might get one. I've been here in Arizona since 1979 and I have not drawn a tag yet.
Regarding the bad taste though, and this is something I got from a friend who has taken several, he said be extremely careful to not get any of the hair from the animal on the meat. He said antelope hair breaks of quite easily and it does something to make it taste bad. Now I got this from an old poacher I new better than 25 years ago. He liked the meat from antelope, but he also said if any of that hair got on the meat, then the meat would taste bad.
How true this might be, I don't know, but this fellow was one hell of a hunter and in his mid 80s. He dropped dead on one of his hunting trip right around 1981 as I recall.
Paul B.

Scorch
March 5, 2007, 05:48 PM
My experience says never shoot an alarmed animal. Adrenalin gives the meat that gamey flavor. If you shoot one that is spooked and running, it will be nasty. If you shoot one that is calm and relaxed, it will be some of the best meat you have ever tried.

As far as tactics, my money has always been on ambushing them at a water hole or in an alfalfa field. Set up at least 200 yds downwind from the water, range it, and just wait. Sooner or later a buck will show up. Chasing them around out on the playas is a waste of time.

NRA4life
March 5, 2007, 06:29 PM
Where I hunt in MT, I think they can smell your tag. If you have a tag, they will run 5 miles at the site of vehicle or the smell of a tag. Without a tag, you can damn near get out and pet them. I'm convinced.

Fat White Boy
March 6, 2007, 01:00 AM
The main reason you see them standing near a highway is that they won't cross them. The are trying to figure out what to do but will almost always turn back away from the road. Same for fences, they won't jump them.

NRA4life
March 6, 2007, 02:54 PM
FWB,

When I first hunted in MT in the late 80's, they would not jump any fences. In the last 2 trips out there, I have seen no less than probably 50 or more jumping fences. I don't know what happened.

Foxman
March 6, 2007, 06:24 PM
NRA4Life they thought they smelt a tag on you:D

Fat White Boy
March 6, 2007, 10:13 PM
Maybe they learned how to jump by watching the deer!?!?

Art Eatman
March 7, 2007, 09:22 PM
I vaguely recall an article in one of the outdoor magazines from the late 1970s commenting that antelope had been seen jumping fences, up in Montana/Wyoming. That startled the observers; not seen before.

Art

rem33
March 7, 2007, 09:28 PM
I vaguely recall an article in one of the outdoor magazines from the late 1970s commenting that antelope had been seen jumping fences, up in Montana/Wyoming. That startled the observers; not seen before.

I find that very interesting.

One of my favorite memories of wild game was north of Arco Idaho one winter day. Several hundred antelope were running at what seemed full speed thru 18" or so of snow covered sage brush. It was a beautiful sight, reminding us of grain blowing in the wind as they went. We were telling a local rancher and thought it must have been 2 to 3 hundred. He said "nope that herd is about 500". Wonderful to see

Driving thru places in this part of the world you can on occasion see Antelope inside fenced fields, they get there some how, they aren't tame pets or domesticated stock..

Jseime
March 8, 2007, 02:20 AM
I had one run into the side of my 94 chev with loud dual exhaust... no one ever accused them of being too smart.

Art Eatman
March 8, 2007, 11:23 AM
Where you have net fences, coyotes (and hogs) will dig holes to go under the fence. I know that deer will sometimes crawl through; I guess antelope would do the same.

FirstFreedom
March 8, 2007, 11:43 AM
Some may prefer the grasses while some may prefer to eat the sage and cedar berries or acorns, etc.. same in deer and in people. We all need to eat, but we prefer different types of food.

Remeber you are what you eat and this translates into how you taste if you were eaten.

I'll remember that - if I ever hop on a plane with a South American soccer team headed over the Andes mountains, I'll tank up on cedar and sagebrush a few days before.