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skeeter1
October 16, 2006, 02:17 PM
Police dog falls from window, catches suspect
Agbar tumbles from second-story window, escapes injury
The Associated Press


Updated: 10:38 a.m. ET Oct 16, 2006
GILFORD, N.H. - A Gilford police dog fell from a second-story window while searching for a robbery suspect during the weekend, but still got its man.

Police were looking for a man who reportedly robbed a car driver at knifepoint Saturday night.

Police say Michael Mount, 30, pulled a knife on the driver of a car in which he was a passenger, forced her off the road and stole her purse.

Police called in their dog, Agbar, to track Mount.

They say Agbar fell from a second-story window while on the hunt, but was not hurt, and led officers to Mount, who was arrested outside his apartment.

CobrayCommando
October 16, 2006, 09:36 PM
Smart or experienced home invaders can easily counter dogs though, I think I would rather rely on mechanical devices, at least as a backup.

chrisandclauida2
October 17, 2006, 12:35 AM
it takes thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours of training to teach even the best dogs to only take food from their owner/handler/master.

training a dog is simply drawing out and using the dogs natural drives. things like prey drive is used to teach them to search for drugs and suspects. the drive to protect territory is used for perimeter security dogs.

these same drives are what the burglar or intruder depends on to neutralize them.

nope a dag is an excellent alarm and can be depended upon to defend territory against intruders right up until the intruder becomes the provider.

i have personally taken one of our drug dogs whose handler quit and was notoriously aggressive when not being run by his handler. aka protecting his territory run and crate.

two slices of lunch meat later we were best friends and he followed all commands like i had him from the first day of training.

nope everything can be defeated and as such everything has his place

CobrayCommando
October 17, 2006, 04:06 PM
What about a pistol with a makeshift one-use suppressor, or a couple of guys with machetes?

If you're going to spend thousands of dollars couldn't you get a very good alarm system and a shotgun?

RevolverLover
October 17, 2006, 04:27 PM
If you're going to spend thousands of dollars couldn't you get a very good alarm system and a shotgun?

Or you can get a good alarm system, shotgun, and a dog. :D

RedPhnx
October 17, 2006, 04:58 PM
My dog seems to work as a great first alarm. I'm not gonna trust him to defend me when someone gets inside to cause harm but he sure lets me know when someone is around or property who doesn't need to be. My neighbors have been commenting on how he never barks unless some one is around our yard or around the neighbors house. Then at night if some one pull into the drive way or walk in the yard he goes crazy barking. I think he makes a great warning system but that all I trust him to do. Once you are within arms reach all he wants you to do is pet him.

skeeter1
October 17, 2006, 05:20 PM
My best friend and shooting buddy has a 98lb Doberman. The dog likes me, but I pity anyone trying to break into their house. They'd be scraping the crap out of their shorts for a week. Great first line of defense.

Having said that, I have three cats, and they're not good for s***, so I have to rely on the "mechanical" defense gizmos. I think a 12-gauge would get a BG's attention.

sparkysteve
October 17, 2006, 05:43 PM
My defense:

http://myspace-056.vo.llnwd.net/01090/65/05/1090495056_l.jpg


My dog Max loves people, unless they show up at night without me knowing about it. It's the only time he barks. He has a mean sounding bark and growl though. It's enough to alert me to someone showing up at my house. He sleeps lighter than I do. He hears a "bump in the night" before my wife or I will.

springmom
October 17, 2006, 06:12 PM
Having said that, I have three cats, and they're not good for s***, so I have to rely on the "mechanical" defense gizmos.

HA! Just wait until the BG gets tangled up in three cats winding themselves around his legs in the dark. He trips over cat #1. He then steps on cat #2, who emits an unearthly banshee screech. This startles cat #3, who then climbs his front (yes, right over THAT spot) and perches on his head with its front claws in his face. The BG will be calling the police himself just to be rescued.:eek:

Commandos have nothing on cats. :D

Springmom

stephen426
October 17, 2006, 06:22 PM
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r173/stephen426/IMG_4440.jpg

My is first line of defense is an 85 lb. akita . She doesn't bark unless there is someone there. Even if she sees the person on a pretty regular basis (pool guy), she will still bark unless we tell her it is okay. If we introduce her to our friends, she usually does not bark at them the next time she sees them. If Chris thinks he can feed my dog and befriend her, he had better have some very good medical insurance. Akita are very tough dogs and were used as impreial guard dogs by the Japanese. They were also used for hunting bears. Her sense of hearing, scent, and night vision is far superior to mine so I would say I trust her as my first line of defense. I know dogs can be shot or poisoned, but unless my dog is shot from a distance, she will most likely alert us first. If she does get taken out, I'm going after the SOB that did it.

To back her up, I have an alarm system that we set every night. It is hard wired instead of wireless so the signal cananot be jammed. We have cellular backup if the phone lines are cut and like most systems, it has a back up battery if the power is cut.

For the final line of defense, I am one of those "forget the dog, beware of owner" kind of guys. I keep my Sig P229 next to my side while the wifie has the Ruger GP-100 on her side. I also have my Surefire 6P with the 120 lumen lamp on the night stand and a shotgun in the closet just in case.

bennnn
October 17, 2006, 06:33 PM
My Best first line...

In two levels of watching the door...

I love these guys,

TX35
October 17, 2006, 07:06 PM
Beautiful girl you have there Stephen... I know what you mean about Akitas'. I have two, male & a female. The best dogs I have ever had!!

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y234/TX35/KC1.jpg

skeeter1
October 17, 2006, 08:00 PM
We have cellular backup if the phone lines are cut and like most systems, it has a back up battery if the power is cut.


Come to think of it, I've got my wireless phone plugged into the UPS I use for my wireless router, and my computer, a laptop, has it's own battery, good for a couple of hours.

The cellphone has the "jumbo" battery, good for 20 days of standby and/or 5hrs of talk time.

If all else fails, I have an inverter that I can plug into the cigarette lighter in the car to recharge the cell phone.

Oh, yeah, and I have ten firearms. I think I'm covered.

It must sound like I'm something of a survivalist, but I'm really not. I just like electronic toys. :)

stephen426
October 17, 2006, 09:20 PM
Come to think of it, I've got my wireless phone plugged into the UPS I use for my wireless router, and my computer, a laptop, has it's own battery, good for a couple of hours.

The cellphone has the "jumbo" battery, good for 20 days of standby and/or 5hrs of talk time.

If all else fails, I have an inverter that I can plug into the cigarette lighter in the car to recharge the cell phone.

Oh, yeah, and I have ten firearms. I think I'm covered.

It must sound like I'm something of a survivalist, but I'm really not. I just like electronic toys.

Actually, the cellular backup is directly connected to my alarm system and is dedicated for the alarm system. It costs a little more a month to maintain, but it is well worth it just in case. ;)

TX35,
Those are some great looking dogs you got there. The one on the right seems to really have a lot of personality. My parents have my dogs parents. Akitas are great dogs. The only thing is that they must be socialized or else they will tear other dogs apart. I'm sure you know how dominant they can be. As long as one accepts the other as dominant, things should be peaceful.

CobrayCommando
October 17, 2006, 09:34 PM
I guess I'm still not convinced.

skeeter1
October 17, 2006, 09:56 PM
I need one of these kitties...

;)

22-rimfire
October 17, 2006, 10:37 PM
The dog is not there to defend your life. The dog is there to alert you to things when you might be asleep or not paying particular attention. Their senses are a lot better than yours.... even a dachhound is better than many. Actually a pretty good dog breed.

They also warn off many with their growls. Deeper the growl the better.

skeeter1
October 18, 2006, 01:54 AM
Yeah, my cousin has a dog that's half Bassett hound and half pit bull. Short legs, but that dog scares the hell out of me. She doesn't need a gun as long as she's got that dog around. That's one mean 50lb dog!

TX35
October 18, 2006, 02:25 AM
Rimfire, I'm sure that Stephen will attest to this. I have no doubt that my Akitas would give their lives for me, as I would mine for them. The bond they have with my family & I is incredible!!

stephen426
October 18, 2006, 03:10 AM
Rimfire, I'm sure that Stephen will attest to this. I have no doubt that my Akitas would give their lives for me, as I would mine for them. The bond they have with my family & I is incredible!!

You know TX35, I have never had the need to test this. I thought about having a friend my dog does not know push my wife around, but I am afraid what would happen if she really attacked. You know how powerful they are, even at 85 lbs. She is obedience trained and off leash trained, but we did not do the protection training because we did not want to change her sweet nature. She is nice around people she knows but she will bark at strangers. I'm pretty sure she would get defensive if someone messed with me, but to her, I am the alpha male and pack leader.

Like I said though, heaven help anyone who messes with my dog.

skeeter1
October 18, 2006, 03:48 AM
Springmom--

HA! Just wait until the BG gets tangled up in three cats winding themselves around his legs in the dark. He trips over cat #1. He then steps on cat #2, who emits an unearthly banshee screech. This startles cat #3, who then climbs his front (yes, right over THAT spot) and perches on his head with its front claws in his face. The BG will be calling the police himself just to be rescued.

Commandos have nothing on cats.

Come to think of it, I think Ella (aka, "Evil Kitty") could/would bite the crap out of anyone who broke in here. Heck, she bites me all the time. Why I put up with that cat, I don't know... except I love her any way.

And then there's Pepper, my 20lb cat. She hasn't got a mean bone in her body, but she is a BIG cat. Not fat, just plain big.

The third one, Molly, is small and shy. No defense from her, I'm sure.

22-rimfire
October 18, 2006, 07:48 AM
I know that many dogs will defend their masters to the death. You just don't want them to. The idea is that they are alert can alert you to trouble long before you would even notice yourself when it comes to unusual noises and so forth in or around your home.

I had a basset hound. Great dog. You would not want to tangle with that loveable pup in the dark. Amazing jaw strength. Break your arm with one good bite. My X's little dog actually woke her up in the middle of the night when an adjacent apartment had a fire... fire department arrived and the tenant was still sleeping and didn't realize anything was amiss. That little mut may have saved lives that night. I love dogs, but I still consider them dogs and not people. That said, I've known people that I would probably choose to save the dog first if given the choice in an emergency.

stephen426
October 18, 2006, 10:59 AM
Talking about dogs saving lives, you guys should check out this article...

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15317373/

Talk about a smart dog! He grabbed his disabled owner's artificial leg and brought it to her along with a phone so she could call for help when the cat accidentally started a fire. The bad thing is that the dog went back in for the cat and neither made it out. Bad kitty!

autopsytech
October 18, 2006, 11:45 AM
Isn't it fantastic that a suspect will go up against someone with a large caliber handgun and will literally say "YEAH Go ahead and shoot me!!!!" But when a little 'ol puppy dog is sent to go after the suspect, right away he's sreaming for his mama and to stop our four legged friend. I guess that's why we have 4 of them in the house at night, plus a few the mechanical burglar supressors of the large caliber type. They make the perfect burglar alarm. DOGS RULE!!!!!!:D

OJ
October 18, 2006, 12:02 PM
My first line alarm - Katie (brindle) at 187# and Charley at 202# (I, as their "handler-master", weigh 180#) and both at over 110 decibels.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/P2240001.jpg

Defensively, however, their strategy is, "Drown'em in drool".;)

My real defense -

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/HANDGUNS/PA120001.jpg

or -

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/P3130001B.jpg

Must work - haven't ever had a problem!:D

bennnn
October 18, 2006, 06:19 PM
The dog is not there to defend your life. The dog is there to alert you to things when you might be asleep or not paying particular attention. Their senses are a lot better than yours....

Isn't it fantastic that a suspect will go up against someone with a large caliber handgun and will literally say "YEAH Go ahead and shoot me!!!!" But when a little 'ol puppy dog is sent to go after the suspect, right away he's sreaming for his mama and to stop our four legged friend.

I know that many dogs will defend their masters to the death. You just don't want them to.

+ 1 to these,, and to everyone else..

A few weeks ago me and a buddy of mine were having a few beers, standing around in my kitchen hooting and being loud, my dogs had only "met" him a few times before. We spar in the yard sometimes, but he rarely comes in to hang out,, we're both pretty busy guys...

So while we're standing there bitching about work and other stuff, he reaches up to "fluff" his ponytail with both hands, raises his hands over his head and shouts something like "Dang-it!!"....

Both my boys jump up growling, and run into the kitchen, going right for his arse,,, I was really impressed... I teach these guys alot of go see, go see, and use a ton of praise when they bark at knocks on the door ect....

But they are alot more alert then I give them credit for sometimes.....

Like I said ,,, I love these guys....

jfrey123
October 19, 2006, 01:14 AM
My mom's 3 dogs are the best for security purposes. You can't beat them! They're hyper-active mini teacup poodles. I know, it sounds like they aren't much, but they're great noise makers. I used to have an early curfew in high school cause everytime I came in late the dogs would bark-- From the time I touched the breezeway door til I came in the main house door. Even after that, they would still bark at me and wake everyone up.

Never once could I open a door quietly enough that they didn't hear. And they always treated me like a threat... These weren't any playful "pet me, pet me!" barks.

For a guy like me, who developed allergies to cats and dogs in his later teens, these little poodles who don't shed and don't have the standard pet dander issue, they're the best little first alert system my Glock could ask for.

kungfucowboy
October 25, 2006, 01:19 AM
well for all my childhood my parents did not have firearms however we had a perimiter fence and raised mastiffs we had 3-7 of them at a time ussually about 5 ranging from 120# to 200+#. we left our doors unlocked and never ever had problems. we figured if they were able to get past the dogs we wouldn't have been able to stop them anyway.

dogs will make anyone looking for tagets of opportunity go elsewhere. if someone is absolutely determined to kill you and goes about it intelligently, you aren't going to stop them but most people are afriad of 100+# dogs so they would have to be really really determined.

tomh1426
October 25, 2006, 01:33 AM
I got two sensor lights , a S&W 1911 and a big pitbull.
I think the dog is like the sensor lights , just a deterant.
Im more worried about cyots that anything

Duxman
November 15, 2006, 10:12 AM
The dog is more than just an alarm system - its a deterrant.

As the saying goes - you dont need to outrun the bear, just the bear's lunch.

If would be robber sees your house with a dog, alarm system etc. and the next door neighbor's home with a kitty cat and no alarm system - guess which home gets targeted for robbery.....

:eek:

USP.40
November 15, 2006, 11:47 AM
Dog's are great alarm systems. My 2 pittbulls are also a great deterrent, they bark and growl when someone comes to the door. Will they attack an intruder? I would say yes but I count on them only as an alarm system. If they decide to latch on someone that will not be pretty.

I remember seeing a cops episode where a suspect wouldn't comply to get handcuffed. He got pepper sprayed, tasered, the thing that made him comply was when that German Shepherd started to gnaw on his leg.

kgeter
November 15, 2006, 09:16 PM
my girlfriend (kinda) had 2 boxers one is aabout 85 lbs, hes the dumbest dog in the world but had a bark that would stop an army. and if i start huggint my girlfriend to rough i guess he starts barkinga nd nipping at me. but once you pet him hes useless. he also does have a very specific bark if theres someone here who shouldnt be. and my girfriend had simple directions. check, if it looks suspicious lock yourself in your room with your cell phone, call the police first then call me. the last time this happened i beat the police and a wannabe robber saw me walking up the drive with me mossberg 500, im not hero and was scared ****less but i love my girfriend and i have ne feelings for him. so oh well im glad he gave up and waited till the police got there.

bennnn
November 15, 2006, 09:27 PM
kgeter,

You're wrong about your GF's boxer, and I disagree... Read my old posts in this thread, get to know that dog, and then get back to me.. Think about what you just said. He's dumb,,, but all the other things?????

This guy right here is the one I trust to do my job untill I can get there to take over.. Even when my wife is asleep...

+1,000,000 to boxers,,, good dogs are made, not born...

dfaugh
November 18, 2006, 11:02 AM
Smart or experienced home invaders can easily counter dogs though, I think I would rather rely on mechanical devices, at least as a backup.

Cobray Commado, that's probably the most ridiculous (no offence) thing I've ever heard. Obviously you know litle or nothing about dogs or dog behavior.

If you would like, come and try to get into my house(or fenced yard)...Instead of my 110 lb. male, I'll just keep the 52 lb. East German female loose in area. She won't take food, nor will she bark at a stranger (she won't even let you get close to her. As soon as you have "crossed the line" into her space, or shown any overt threat to me and my family, she'll give you the whole nine yards. You'll have to kill her to stop her from eating you. Gonna shoot her? Ever try to hit a target moving at 40 mph? And, if you wound her, that's just gonna make her more angry.

OJ
November 18, 2006, 12:44 PM
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/P2240001.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/CHAIRKATIE.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/PA210005.jpg

Our social graces are up to snuff and we expect your's to be also. Please have a seat and be quiet until halftime!



:D

X-RAY
November 18, 2006, 09:30 PM
I've had 2 dogs that went into protection mode on their own without any formal training. One was a golden retreiver. Biggest sweetest mushball of a dog . My ex had answered the door and had just tried to shoo-off a door to door salesman. In her usual rude manner, (came naturally to her) she had tried to close the door on him when he blocked the door with his foot and raised his voice. The dog was a bigun ,about 100 pounds, heard the change in her voice , launched off the couch , jammed his head through the partially opened door , showed his teeth and gave a gravel-shaking growl that turned the salesman pale. Last we saw of him, he was tripping over his own feet trying to get away. The other was a male brindle Boxer (Bennn : Boxers RULE) who was very protective of my prsent wife. One of our friends was talking to her about how he was going to beat her on the basketball court and he raised his voice and started to get in her face when my dog ( named Ambush) grabbed his wrist and re-directed him. WE all stood there with our jaws hanging open because it took only a second for the dog to react. He had steak for dinner that night !!( the dog that is ). Even if your dog only buys you a few seconds it well may be the amount of time you need to ready yourself.

GroovedG19
November 18, 2006, 09:59 PM
I need a puppy.Some day...

45RackerTracker
November 18, 2006, 10:47 PM
Dogs really do have a sixth sense. We have a 9 year old 5 lb Yorkie, that tells my wife when I'm getting home, a couple of minutes before I turn the corner to the block. I have no set schedule so it's not out of habit. Eden (the Yorkie) can tell when someone is about, you look outside and see nothing, but you continue to watch and you will see when someone or somethng is causing her growling and barking. One night when we were sound asleep, we were awakened at around 3 am, we saw an orange glow, our 8 dogs were going crazy, howling and barking. The house on the end of the street was ablaze. We called the police and they said they were on it already. As a deterent and alarm you can't beat the acute senses of a dog, or 8.:D

Freetacos
November 19, 2006, 01:34 AM
if they really want to hurt you they will use your dog for target practice then do the serious shooting on you

Ailean Mac an Daroch
November 19, 2006, 07:18 PM
it takes thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours of training to teach even the best dogs to only take food from their owner/handler/master.

Sorry but I have to disagree with the above statement. I have had many dogs which were trained from puppyhood and will not eat from strangers - in fact they will not eat at all unless I or my wife are there.

PJ---
"Dozer" says Hello to your guys...!
Mastiff owners are always good guys. We have to be the people our dogs think we are!

HannibalTheCrow
November 23, 2006, 10:42 AM
a good watchdog is nice to have i agree. But, you throw a well cooked porterhouse infront of one, loaded with some dog stopping material, and Rover is out of commission. Besides, they could have a gun too and shoot Rover.

I think I will stick to my little Beagle and my trusty 9MM

Dave R
November 23, 2006, 04:12 PM
The dog is more than just an alarm system - its a deterrant.Amen.

I believe that a good dog can be "defeated." But it will certainly sound the alarm first. And it will certainly be a deterrent to anyone who "cases" your place.

I have an Akita also, and I trust her with my life.

ETA I do maintain my own firearm defense as a backup to the dog, of course.

Duckman44!
November 29, 2006, 02:35 AM
you dont seem to make much sense! It is true that dogs will take food from just about anyone, however, it would be hard for an intruder to give food to your dog when they are outside trying to get into your locked house and your dog is inside barking his head off. You guys saying they aren't any good because of the food obviously dont know what you are talking about. I have taken care of (fed and watched) my aunts dogs many times and everytime I go to her house both dogs act like I am lunch until my aunt calms them down or I say their names. If a car pulls into the driveway or one of the motion lights comes on or they hear a noise at any time day or night then ones nose is on the door handle and the other is in the window trying to get a free meal and I'm not talking about lunch meat.;) Dogs are great. Having them can't hurt anything as far as HD goes.

OJ
November 29, 2006, 01:32 PM
It is true that dogs will take food from just about anyone,

Not true of all dogs. Mine don't accept treats or any food from anyone but us and were trained that way. In fact, my fawn male (202#) won't even accept a treat from me when I'm going somewhere in the Suburban and he isn't going. He recognizes it as a bribe and just rejects it. They both are trained to sit for treats from us also.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/FEEDINGTIME.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/P7050002.jpg


Brindle "little" sister weighs in a only 187#. We've had Mastiffs for over two decades and these litter mates are the largest we've ever had. We've shown several to obedience titles, though, and their size and loud barking are significant deterrents. We just don't have intruders.

Their backup is a Colt's Series 70 .45 ACP and an M1A if needed.:D

40MM
November 30, 2006, 02:37 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v320/nazm/ROCKYBONE3.jpg

My little puppy Rocky. Here he is chewing on the last guy that tried to break into my house! :D (Disclaimer: I am obviously joking!)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v320/nazm/ROCKYMAD.jpg

AKhunter
November 30, 2006, 09:31 AM
40MM--Hey, is that a Boerboel? Tell me more about him--he's a good lookin' dog!

40MM
December 1, 2006, 01:05 AM
AKhunter... Yes he is a Boeboel. In the pics he is 6 months old at 50kg (105lbs?). He is the biggest goofball around! Very friendly with all the neighborhood kids, who by the way, always come to look at the "Big doggy".:D At around 9 months he started showing the guarding instinct that comes naturally to these dogs. Barking at strangers until i tell him its OK. Although they are big dogs, they have unusual amounts of energy. I swear he has the hyperactivity of a Jack Russell! If you looking for a large, intelligent guard dog that can double as a family pet, get a Boerboel.Its hard to beat them for sheer intimidation!

Willy T
December 1, 2006, 07:31 PM
My German Shepherd is a first alarm when I am home. He seems to hear things not of the normal nature in my home better than I. When away his size and bark I hope would let a BG see there are more easily places to rob. My red bloodhound is a loveable clown and keeps my GSD very happy with company. I am thinking of working the Blood Hound. She is almost two and has a disposition I can work with. Its hard to beat a good dog. ;)

stevekolt
December 2, 2006, 07:10 AM
We have motion activated outside lighting, an alarm system, a wonderful 100# German Shepherd, and a 45# psychotic mutt...really. If you were to meet TJ you'd agree with the diagnosis. The dogs are just part of the alarm system, if someone breaks in, our weapons are there to protect the dogs too ;)

tshadow6
December 2, 2006, 08:31 AM
My 50 lb. Sheperd/Chow mix chased a panhandler away from my truck while I was disctracted. I pulled up to the drivethrough of a fast food place, and while placing my order, this guy got close to my window. The dog nearly jumped out to get this guy. Get a medium sized working dog and you'll double your chances of getting home.

jeager106
December 2, 2006, 10:05 AM
I'm not gonna attempt to address the professional burglar.
I doubt the average home owner, is ever going to be bothered by a real pro.
The professional burglar, the one that can defeat alarms, leap tall building with a single bound and all that, seldom get caught, never carries a gun, almost never steals one, and targets only the affluent.
The affluent have the mostest to steal.
The average burglar is the idiot that might kill you.
Given that let me say that ove better than 20 years I hunted down and caught burglars.
Few were smart. All were dangerous because the were not smart.
I'm retired now and I will flat tell ya that if some dummy gets into my house at night the sucker isn't getting an opportunity to kill me or mine.
Now that we have established the fact that the average night sneak thief ain't all that smart, is perfectly capably, even willing to kill you for your goods , especially GUNS, and the fact that I've caught a whole bunch of them I can say with a certain amount of life's experience that most burglars that I ever encountered would knowingly go into a house with a barking dog inside.
In fact I can only recall one time that two buttwipes got into a home with a barking dog inside but the buttwipes knew the residents were gone for the night.
Yeah, many burglars know you.
No burglar I ever encountered would attempt a break in where the house was surrounded with that little manicured hedge with a kabillion sharp needles either. (privit hedge maybe?)
So a dog is indeed a very good deterent. Even a little yappy lap dog.
It will for sure wake you up so you can get creative about what to do in the event the idiot is sick enough, stoned enough, or just plane suicidal enough, to break into your house anyway.
I have absolutely no use for a night stalking sneak thief.
I have seen what the sick muthas will do to defenseless elderly victims.
Shooting the scum is too good for them but shooting is effective.:D

odessastraight
December 2, 2006, 01:01 PM
Here's Loui Loui standing guard over some unsecured weapons. He's also an attack kitty and it takes a strong chain to keep him off of those Pit Bulls and Dobermans he likes to slap around.
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a74/odessastraight/IM000954.jpg

nkielborn
December 12, 2006, 06:43 AM
21648

21649

these are my next two dogs i already have a shepard and i think these two will make an excellent addition. the first one is a tibetan mastiff and the second is a caucasian mountain dog (the old soviet guard dog). my shepard is getting old hes almost ten so his time is coming to an end sadly but hes a good dog and i will miss him and for defense i saw him in action he scared person who came to the door when i had only the screen door open. I don't know if he could be topped so I don't know if I would get another.

RedPhnx
December 12, 2006, 04:22 PM
Be careful with the caucasion dogs, those are highly aggressive dogs, not the best for a family pet.

Hedley
December 12, 2006, 04:54 PM
Here's my attack squad. The greyhounds are pacifists and only bark when they want to play, which is rare. Their personalities are more like little horses. Rudy(the big male) looks mean but is a gentle giant. His gal pal Birdie is even more quiet.
http://img369.imageshack.us/img369/3465/img1561fe6.jpg
http://img369.imageshack.us/img369/9742/img1562br6.jpg
http://img296.imageshack.us/img296/29/img1567yu3.jpg
Edit- The window above the dogs' crates was where our house was broken into a month ago. We were lucky that the thugs didn't harm the dogs while they were in the crates.
But my fiance's dog is a little radar detector. She can hear someone outside within about 50 yards, and never hesitates to bark like crazy in the middle of the night. At 5 pounds dripping wet, she wouldn't be much in the attack department, but she lets us know when someone's approaching the house.
http://img460.imageshack.us/img460/7875/img1022uf3.jpg

John28226
December 13, 2006, 10:57 AM
Dogs can be useful but are better as "first alert" systems; a crook who expects to encounter a dog may come equipped with a can of hornet spray or drop a cinder block on the dog barking at the bottom of the fence.

Fences, lighting (especially the quality motion activated type), locks and alarms as well as intelligent perimeter design should all be considered. A few years ago the catch phrase was CPTED - Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design. Don't make it easy for criminals to hide or to access your property.

Having a plan (not just for criminal attack but fire too) for emergencies and ensuring that all family members know how to execute that plan should not be overlooked.

Most police departments have pamphlets that help you secure your home. Normally they are free.

John
Charlotte, NC

High Planes Drifter
December 13, 2006, 07:15 PM
quote:
it takes thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours of training to teach even the best dogs to only take food from their owner/handler/master.
--------------
My friend, let me introduce you to the Fila Brasilio, a breed that absolutely hates strangers by nature :

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/filabrasileiro.htm

Try feeding one of these, and you may just draw back a nub.
Not your typical Bloodhound.

The protective trait in Filas is called Ojeriza, it translates into "Hatred and Loathing of Strangers."

jweissg
December 17, 2006, 06:12 PM
This is my home protector. In reality, he only needs to give me time to get to my shotgun, but I sincerely doubt I could move that fast. He is very protective, especially when my girlfriend is around and is serious as a heart attack when he needs to be.

No need to growl, he just has a low rumble. A naturally defensive dog will not accept food when he observes a threat. You couldnt get Ares to take his eyes off of the UPS man if you had a filet.

40MM, I thought Ares (a Presa Canario) "turned on" about the same time -- nine months. I was wrong. Wait until about the 2 year point and you will notice a distinct and sudden change. It is nice not worrying when my girl goes for a run or I am late getting home.

Bradbx
December 17, 2006, 09:47 PM
OJ, I love the pics of the dogs on the couch/chair, our dog used to do that as a way of not-quite-sitting on the couch (which she wasn't allowed on). She was a black lab and dalmation mix, excellent with kids (liked to be chased by them while carrying a toy, she'd look back to stay just out of reach), and usually good with new people.

However, she surprised me once. We had a home inspector come to check out my parents' house, it was just me and the dog at home. He brought a biscuit... normally she'd run off to eat it right away, but she didnt like this guy for some reason. She kept growling, fur stuck up all the way down her back. she sniffed at the treat and took it into her mouth, but didnt eat it. stayed right there and growled at him, despite my reasurring her. That was with no formal training, so i think they could be trained to not accept anything.

OJ
December 18, 2006, 12:25 AM
OJ, I love the pics of the dogs on the couch/chair, our dog used to do that as a way of not-quite-sitting on the couch (which she wasn't allowed on).

Brad - I know there's going to be a lot of explaining to do when we get to the Rainbow Bridge because, after nearly three decades of Mastiffs, these are the first ones that have been allowed on the furniture. They both just back up and plant their rear ends on the sofa and, sometimes the chairs. The big fawn male surprises guests when he sits on my lap when I'm in the chair and sometimes, he sits on guest's laps - if he knows them.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/PA210002.jpg

Here he is sitting on the lap of a guest - his breeder - who visited us.

The brindle "little" sister (187#) is more shy - well, she's a girl.

:D :D

However, you are correct - they don't take even treats from strangers - when Charley is offended he doesn't get to go with me - he won't even take a treat from me - he knows it's a bribe and he's above taking bribes.:D

FirstFreedom
December 18, 2006, 01:00 AM
Note to self: Don't break into OJ's house. My akita does that too...sitting her rear on the couch with paws on the floor - weird.

OJ
December 18, 2006, 01:00 PM
Charley's a real lap dog - here he is in my wife's lap.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/P7120006.jpg

His size alone impresses all who see him. That's his deterrent value. His defense strategy is "Drown'em in Drool" or just squash'em by sitting on them.;)

:D :D

Vic303
December 18, 2006, 01:27 PM
Ridgebacks, I love our Ridgies!
I am sure they would defend/harass in the event of an intruder. I KNOW how much they can scare folks with a bark session! The red one is particularly territorial...

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b353/vic303/IMG_0783.jpg

45RackerTracker
December 18, 2006, 01:36 PM
Welcome to the forum. I'd hate to be around your dog carrying some beef jerky in my pocket. He might mistake me for a soup bone. You should invite some burglars over to your place, for a late night snack.
Seriously, that's a seriously great looking dog, and crime deterent.

45RackerTracker
December 18, 2006, 01:41 PM
When they sit on your shoes, it's to prevent you from leaving. My yorkie hides my socks when I get home and take them off. Dogs are smarter and more intuitive than even the "scientists and researchers" know.

jweissg
December 18, 2006, 05:15 PM
There is actually a huge difference in the breeds of dogs and the drives that compel them to "defend."

Most of your shephards operate in a prey drive and are trained, through that prey drive, to "defend." I put quotes around defend because they are actually not in a defensive drive. Most shephards (most, not all) have relatively low defensive drives. These breeds are preferred as police K-9's because the prey drive is most prominent as they chase the bad guy.

Most of your "bully" type or mastiff-type dogs have high defense drive and little or no prey drive. Most mastiff-types are less likely to chase cats, squirells, etc because their prey drive is so low. These dogs are not interested in chasing the bad guy, they are interested in defending themselves and their's. Mastiffs typically require little training (really only need to be raised as part of the pack) to learn to defend because they are actually acting in a defensive drive. Once the threat is over (the bad guy has retreated), they are content to stay put.

The one notable exception is your game bred pitbull. These dogs actually operate in fight drive. They will often not disengage even when the threat has been neutralized. For lack of a better term, they are nearly blinded by the fight drive and can be tough to keep focused on the actual job of defending. These dogs will, however, fight and fight and fight and fight. No amount of pressure will but a good pit to flight.

Not a dog expert, just dog experienced. In case anyone was considering a dog for first defense.

Joe

EEEZNOW
December 18, 2006, 07:04 PM
I have been wanting a big mastiff for about a year now. I am in Alabama anyone know where I can get a good one? I have always wanted a dog that weighs as much as I do!!!!!

Bradbx
December 18, 2006, 08:28 PM
Dogs are smarter and more intuitive than even the "scientists and researchers" know.
Smart indeed. My brother-in-law had sat down to eat dinner at the "table" in the living room. Their dog, Jackson, comes up to him growling (just playing, very talkative dog) with a squeaky toy and squeaks it at him a few times. He reaches out to grab it and she backs away. She gets a little closer, squeaks more and backs away.

So a few times of this and he decides to play with the dog so she'll stop bothering him. He gets up, the dog backs way up to the end of the room. He gets down on all fours and then as he gets closer, she drops the squeaky toy and runs back to sniff at his dinner plate (at which point he corrected her :)). The funny thing is, he should have seen this coming. Jackson does this to their other dog when he has a toy she wants all the time.

Capt Charlie
December 18, 2006, 08:55 PM
I have been wanting a big mastiff for about a year now. I am in Alabama anyone know where I can get a good one? I have always wanted a dog that weighs as much as I do!!!!!
At the risk of getting off topic myself (;) ), you might start here (http://www.mastiff.org/).

(English) Mastiffs are not for everyone. Their personality is much different than that of most dogs, and they are typically high maintenance (they shed, drool, and vet bills are out of sight.) The up side is that they are the most affectionate, loyal couch potatoes I've ever seen, and they've been rightly referred to as the "Aristocratic Guardian".

Mastiffs have a high incidence of inherited health problems, so be very sure to research your proposed breeder and the pup's pedigree. A well bred Mastiff is going to run you in the neighborhood of $2000. or more. Do NOT consider a pet shop (read: puppy mill) or back-yard breeder. Believe me, that road leads only to sorrow.

This is my girl, "Woodmark's Hi Dollar Cover Girl", at 15 months. She's 3 1/2 now and weighs in at just a few ounces under 206 pounds. Until recently, she would run and hide from a knock at the door. Now, coffee cups rattle on the table and pictures fall off walls when she barks at visitors :D .

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=13366&d=1118450041

OJ
December 19, 2006, 01:12 AM
(English) Mastiffs are not for everyone. Their personality is much different than that of most dogs, and they are typically high maintenance (they shed, drool, and vet bills are out of sight.) The up side is that they are the most affectionate, loyal couch potatoes I've ever seen, and they've been rightly referred to as the "Aristocratic Guardian".

Capt Charlie,

You are right all the way - your "girl" is downright gorgeous with beautiful conformation and mask. We've had Mastiffs for nearly three decades and were active on the show ring circuit until about ten years ago when we called it quits for that activity. We showed a couple to obedience titles - not the easiest task in the world - and I had a large brindle male who was too much of a clown in the ring but, I did win an obedience trophy with him. We've had our share of vet bills in the past with severe dysplasia (elbows and hips).

Your point about the breeder is 100% correct - hip dysplasia found in as high as 20% in some recent years. These two come from long time friends who, incidentally are "Five Star Breeders" who check their breeding stock and don't use any for breeding until they have been cleared for genetically related problems - hips, elbows, heart, thyroid, and eye problems. Clearly, there are not enough breeders in existence but we in the MCOA are working on it.

I have been wanting a big mastiff for about a year now. I am in Alabama anyone know where I can get a good one? I have always wanted a dog that weighs as much as I do!!!!!

For the first time in three decades, I'm not the heavyweight in this king family - not even second place. The fawn male weighed 202# in October and the brindle female weighed 287#. I weigh in at about 182# - these have had obedience training every day since we got them a 11 weeks of age and their manners show it every day - as when we had an open house Saturday with many friends who are less than comfortable with large dogs.

As 11 week old puppies - 'We don't know who those people are or where we are but, we're together."

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/P9110028AB.jpg

Now-

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/DOGS/P3030008AAB.jpg

My being a retired surgeon probably helps some keeping vet bills down some but, it is well known, Mastiffs do have a problem with joint dysplasia and the number one consideration to avoid heartbreak is buying only from a really dedicated and honest breeder as we did this time.

:D :D