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View Full Version : I just got made out today


Doug.38PR
October 12, 2006, 04:29 PM
I was just sitting next to a lady to my right at a conference table working on some paperwork and had my windbreaker on (with my Colt .38 Official Police in a RIGHT hand shoulder holster on the left side). I lean across the table to write something down and she says (in a humorous tone) "Okay, what are you packing."
"packing?"
She nods and puts makes a hand motion reaching for a gun on her left side.
"a gun?"
she nodded. and said "you have something showing through the side of your coat

"oh, no! That's my cell phone."
"okay hahaha"
and instantly started turing attention backto what we were doing.
I did in fact have the gun on....but what she saw imprinted through the side of my windbreaker wasn't a gun....it was the double speedloader pouches and assumed it was a gun. I went back to my hotel room later to see what she saw and leaned forward allowing the windbreaker to stretch and I could BARELY see something imprinting just under my armpit
I didn't show her my cell phone (why wouldn't I do that? she might think)
I don't know if she bought it (I kind of doubt it, it was a dumb lie and, to me, an obvious evasion.)
My friend was standing in the room with us working on something else (he knows I carry) and just said after we got outside, "why didn't you just tell her?"
I said I don't want other people to know I carry. I don't know how she will respond to it, if she will use it against me, if she will tell anyone else and get everyone else (including my supervisor) nervous and start worrying about where and when I am carrying.

Blackwater OPS
October 12, 2006, 05:53 PM
Was she cute?

Heheh, seriously though there are less then 5 people who know I carry(besides forum members;) ). It can be used against you, don't let on.

AK103K
October 12, 2006, 06:18 PM
I was waiting for you to say it banged hard into the table. :)

I think I might understand what she saw. Of all the different types of holsters out there, the ones I seem to spot the most, other than the obvious fanny packs,(and you rarely see them anymore) are the shoulder holsters. Its usually because of an open front coat or jacket and someone not paying attention.

Shoulder holsters are not my favorite type of holster, but I do have a couple. I usually just use them in the winter for a second gun while plowing. When you lean forward, the gun and your reload if you have one on the holster does tend to swing forward too, especially if you dont use a tie down. My best luck concealing with them is under a pull over sweatshirt.

Just curious, is there a special reason you chose a shoulder holster over a belt holster?

Bud Helms
October 12, 2006, 06:37 PM
You got made out? :D

oystermick
October 12, 2006, 08:02 PM
"Is that a gun in your pocket, or are you just glad to see me."
Well, SOMEONE had to post it...

link523
October 12, 2006, 08:20 PM
I was waiting for you to say it banged hard into the table.
my wife has slapped my xd a few times after a "smart comment" had her ring ding on the slide and her grab her hand in pain that gets people attention buy the why i carry iwb at 1:30 or 10:30 so she is slapping my belly:mad:

beenthere
October 12, 2006, 08:51 PM
There are no invisible ways to carry a gun. Don't try to fool a wife or kid of a police officer. They see guns carried in every conceivable place and can spot them 80% of the time. You are trying to conceal from the casual observer, the hood in the darkened parking lot etc. If someone is aware and really observant you will be made.

Doug.38PR
October 12, 2006, 09:32 PM
Just curious, is there a special reason you chose a shoulder holster over a belt holster?


I am wearing a windbreaker. In the winter, jackets and windbreakers come up to my waist not down to my legs like sportcoats do. Shoulder holster is the only concealable option (unless I am wearing a snubby). The belt holster would actually be more noticable (especially in leaning over). When you are running with a belt holster, it flops a little and is hanging on your hip. Shoulder holster is fastened to your ribcage. Belt holster is more noticable when the coat is blowing in the wind than the shoulder holster as your arm and ribcage are contributing to concealing it

BUT, the holster or ammo puch sliding forward and exposing is not a problem for me as there are belt loops on each side of the holster strap and I keep them just behind the right and left side beltloops on my pants so they can't slide forward.

What she saw was BARELY noticable (I wonder is she was an X policewoman or had dad who was a cop or something)

You got made out?

LOL!! Upon rereading my title....o boy, I gotta expect this:D

JohnKSa
October 12, 2006, 10:25 PM
There are no invisible ways to carry a gun.I've carried for over a decade, including a couple of short periods while I was a houseguest. In all that time, I've only had one person note anything unusual and that was because she actually bumped into my gun while I was carrying it in my more relaxed concealment position. Told her it was a cellphone and that was the end of it.

I think it's possible to fully conceal a gun if one is reasonable about both their choice of firearms and their carry method. On the other hand, if one decides to carry a full-sized revolver and two reloads in a shoulder holster under a light windbreaker in warm weather...well...

badbob
October 12, 2006, 10:27 PM
Doug.38PR, I've been thinking about a shoulder rig. Are you using a horizontal carry or vert. carry? What kind of harness? Thumb break or friction retention?
Is it comfortable?:)

badbob

Blackwater OPS
October 12, 2006, 10:56 PM
I carry a J frame in an ankle holster under a pair of jeans and I would defy any person to tell me when I am or am not carrying. It IS possible to have an "invisible" CCW.

Dreadnought
October 12, 2006, 11:18 PM
Nobody's ever made me while carrying a full sized 92FS or a 1911. Even wearing suits, or jeans and a t-shirt. There's no free lunch, you have to buy your clothes with concealed carry in mind.

oldbillthundercheif
October 13, 2006, 12:12 AM
It's good to know you are properly attired to pull off the ankle-holster, Blackwater. I never trust any man who wears tight pants...

UniversalFrost
October 13, 2006, 01:04 AM
I never trust any man who wears tight pants...
Come on whats wrong with wearing sking tight leather pants and looking like one of the guys from an 80's hair band?


HeHe LoL!!:D :D

Good one!

As far as carrying I always carry a 96Brigadier in the small of my back (IWB) and an old snubby detective 38spl in an akle rig. Only got made once when I bent over to tie my shoe lace and the pant leg went up, looked up because the whole room went quiet and saw they were all staring at my leg and me.

AK103K
October 13, 2006, 07:29 AM
The belt holster would actually be more noticeable (especially in leaning over). When you are running with a belt holster, it flops a little and is hanging on your hip. Shoulder holster is fastened to your ribcage. Belt holster is more noticeable when the coat is blowing in the wind than the shoulder holster as your arm and ribcage are contributing to concealing it
I know everyone is different and makes choices on what they find to work best for them. I'm not knocking the shoulder holster, I use them for certain occasions and the definitely have their uses, but they also have certain issues that need addressing.

For me, in the 30 some years I've been wearing a pistol, and almost always, a full sized pistol, the IWB belt holster has been the most concealable and comfortable way to do it. Its so concealable, you can actually answer the door without a cover garment and with just a slight shift in body position, the person your talking to isnt the wiser. I routinely hide my P229 and a double reload under a untucked shirt. The only part of the pistol that shows at or above the belt is the grip, and depending on your holster maybe a strap or clip, or even nothing at all. IWB or OWB you do need to wear a proper belt. If you do, there is very little, if any, flopping or gun/holster movement, and everything is very secure.

If anything the shoulder holster is much more prone to being spotted in blowing wind if you leave your coat open. It presents the gun to the front, where the opening is, where a belt holster tends to be towards the rear of the hip. Either way, your arm "can" help block the coat, if you can catch it in time. The wind doesnt usually cooperate with a warning a blast is coming though, and the open coat is usually blown open before you have a chance to react. Either way, you need to address the open coat thing, but with a shoulder holster, you really need to be more vigilant.

With any of them, you also have to be very aware of your body movements and how that affects your clothing and gun. Any type of movement, like leaning over a table or bending forward, will pull your clothes tight against you and anything your wearing under them. With a belt gun, its usually the butt and reload at the rear, with a shoulder holster, the straps often show across your back and shoulders, and at the sides just under your arms, and depending on your holster, things may fly forward, against the front of what your wearing, and if its open, right out the front. If your leaning on the table with your arms forward, the reload and (with a horizontal carry holster) the barrel end of the holster will poke out the back and sides and the reload can also be seen just behind the arm. (which is probably what gave you away)

No matter what you carry, you really need to dress around the gun and pay close attention to how you move. You may need to alter what you wear, or you may have to change your gun and holster or that combination all together. Bending at the waist, sitting down in a hard chair, getting up from a table, getting out of your car, how you allow people to pass close to you, etc, all become something you change or are very aware of. Attitude is also a big part of it. How you carry yourself is also a big factor. A direct look and/or comment, and a nice one usually goes farther, can quickly redirect attention. You just need to be aware to do it.

Samurai
October 13, 2006, 08:00 AM
(Insert Juvenile and Infantile Humor Here:)

Mmmkay. It's called getting "made." Getting "made out" is what I used to do with the girls on the playground at school. One's bad. One's not so bad. (*chuckles*) And, depending on the girl, I'll leave it for you to decide which is which!

Ok. No more jokes. Just take the lesson in stride. Don't carry speedloaders on your hip. They're too bulky. Maybe someone else could pull it off, but it appears you can't...

As Musashi would say, Adapt to any environment!

Musketeer
October 13, 2006, 08:06 AM
I think it's possible to fully conceal a gun if one is reasonable about both their choice of firearms and their carry method. On the other hand, if one decides to carry a full-sized revolver and two reloads in a shoulder holster under a light windbreaker in warm weather...well...


I agree! You also do not need to be a fashion disaster or stand out in the process. In my experience Shoulder Holsters are one of the worst ways to conceal a gun you absolutely do not want noticed.

Doug.38PR
October 13, 2006, 09:45 AM
Doug.38PR, I've been thinking about a shoulder rig. Are you using a horizontal carry or vert. carry? What kind of harness? Thumb break or friction retention?
Is it comfortable?

Vertical. Nylon. Thumb break. Yes it is VERY comfortable and concealable (in spite of what happened yesterday.) I was very surprised at her noticing anything. I looked in the mirror and what she saw.....was almost nothing, I could barely see anything pushing through the fabric. She must have a REAL keen eye.


JohnKa, We are up in Marshall. Yesterday up here it was in the low to mid 50s with a cold wind.

45RackerTracker
October 13, 2006, 06:25 PM
I just recently acquired my CCW and can't say from my experience which rig is best for CCW. OTOH, my teachers in the pistol safety course required by the state here to get a CCW all agree that shoulder rigs are out. Not only do they betray you at times but can potentially get you into trouble if the muzzle is pointed at someone behind you. In an emergency life or death situation you might let off one a little too early and hurt or kill someone standing behind you. These teachers, all seasoned men and certified by the NRA all carry on the waist in one form or another. None of them carry SOB for fear of being pushed against a wall or lying suppine, you cant get your piece out. The pocket is also good for the element of surprise. The ankle is ok but takes too long to access. I do what I was taught. Jusy my .02.;)

kirkcdl
October 13, 2006, 06:32 PM
Judging by her wording,sounds to me like a "gunny".You could've made a new "Gun Friend"....:D

JohnKSa
October 13, 2006, 08:52 PM
Doug,

I work in Greenville, TX which is a good bit farther north than Marshall. Highs and lows yesterday were within 2 degrees of those in Marshall. Wore a short-sleeved shirt all day yesterday inside and out and was very comfortable.

My point was that if your carry choices make it hard to conceal, you're going to get made a lot more often than someone who makes more conservative choices.

Doug.38PR
October 13, 2006, 10:19 PM
JohnKSa

Doug,

I work in Greenville, TX which is a good bit farther north than Marshall. Highs and lows yesterday were within 2 degrees of those in Marshall. Wore a short-sleeved shirt all day yesterday inside and out and was very comfortable.

:confused: :confused: :confused: Are we talking about the same day? Thursday, October 12 right? Early in the morning it was about 70ish. But by the time 10:00 rolled around everyone on our crew was coming in from outside saying "that cold north wind is blowing in, it's freezing outside." Sure enough, from then on well into the night it was cold, high 40s to low 50s. Most of our guys except me and several others didn't even have jackets up there with them, the just wore as many layers of clothing as they could get on their backs for the rest of the day.

My point was that if your carry choices make it hard to conceal, you're going to get made a lot more often than someone who makes more conservative choices.

Well, that is true. Good point. But, the tradeoff is that if you get too small and conceal the gun too much, then 1) you can be left with a less effective less accurate gun that is 2) harder to get to and 3) a smaller gun will have more recoil. For instance, if you stick a short barreled baby Glock ISWB under an untucked shirt (for one thing, on certain given occasions that can look pretty sloppy) that can be pretty hard to get to trying to get your shirt tail up and out of the way and you don't have as long a barrel hurting your accuracy and lessening the velocity of the round. Or if you are carrying a Colt Agent in an ankle holster, sure that conceals pretty well, but you've got to get your leg up, hand down to leg and hand back up to shoot (and hope the pant leg doesn't get in the way).

I have carried my Official Police ISWB under a tucked in shirt. The shirt is tucked around the clip part and using my cell phone and holder to cover the holster clip on my belt (works great) but the gun is somewhat difficult to get ot (and it can be very uncomfortable after a while)

BUT, sometimes I do opt for the smaller Detective special on a belt holster at crossdraw under my coat with 2 speedloaders in my pocket (about as easy to get to as a gun in a shoulder rig but it still has less power and my accuracy won't be as good.) Or I will just carry the DS in my pants pocket. (but it is harder to get my hand in my pocket and pull the gun out than it is to draw from a shoulder or hip holster.)



45RackerTracker,

shoulder rigs are out. Not only do they betray you at times but can potentially get you into trouble if the muzzle is pointed at someone behind you. In an emergency life or death situation you might let off one a little too early and hurt or kill someone standing behind you.

I can see how that might apply to horizontal shoulder holsters but not vertical ones (which is what I have). But, a lot of LEOs carry shoulder holsters both horizontal and vertical and have for 100 years to this day.
As I see it, you can accidentally hit anyone in any direction if you start pulling the trigger too early no matter where you are carrying your gun. Keeping your finger off the trigger until you are prepared to fire is what is needed.

JohnKSa
October 13, 2006, 11:27 PM
the tradeoff is that if you get too small and conceal the gun too much, then 1) you can be left with a less effective less accurate gun that is 2) harder to get to and 3) a smaller gun will have more recoil.The REAL trade-off is that if you get made one time too often you could easily end up not being able to carry ANY gun at all to work which would be a FAR worse trade-off than carrying a little gun in a harder to access concealment location.

CDH
October 14, 2006, 06:21 AM
The REAL trade-off is that if you get made one time too often you could easily end up not being able to carry ANY gun at all to work which would be a FAR worse trade-off than carrying a little gun in a harder to access concealment location.

According to the instructor or my most recent CCW class, that fear (in Texas) is totally unfounded from a practical standpoint because in all the years he's been teaching CCW classes and therefore constantly in contact with LEO's, he told us that he has never yet heard of even a single case where a CCW carrier was cited for an unintentional "flash".

There "may" have been a time or two when I carried illegally before the CCW permit process was in place (although I don't recall that for sure), and if I did, I would have been quite paranoid about being made by anybody.
But in all those times of which I probably didn't carry a pistol but am not certain that I can recall that I did, I never once got a second look by any LEO or anyone else. Of course, my only carry weapon I would have ever had with me if I ever did carry but I can't recall if I did, would have been my Walther PP.
These days, now that I can carry legally although I don't remember that I ever did carry illegally, I carry more "substantially" because I'm not as paranoid about being made, and I am amazed that what "seems" to me to be a very large weapon, a Colt Commander LW, is almost as easily concealable as the Walther "most" of the time.
For those times when I absolutely, positively do NOT want to be made (more formal events), my Walther is still my little buddy that comes along for the ride. (And if anyone makes a joke about carrying a Walther PP and wearing a tuxedo at the same time and the obvious image that brings up, I'm going to send a friend of mine, 005, to come see you).

I've started making it a fun little game to try to detect who is or who isn't carrying while I'm out shopping with the wife, and even when I see someone who I think is carrying, I am often proved wrong when the guy/gal reaches for the "made" area and pulls out a cell phone or eyeglass case.

If we all take the advice so freely available here on TFL about concealment issues, I really don't think that any of us will ever have a problem with it.
Interestingly, what started this thread was that it was a shoulder holster that got made, and from reading what others have said, I had already discounted any shoulder holster for my own use because of the issues with them raised here.
In the end, it seems that the majority of people who know about these things and have the experience to back it up are virtually unanimous about the idea that the best concealment comes from using very high quality IWB holsters along with a proper gun belt and not trying to carry an overly huge or heavy weapon.

Carter

AK103K
October 14, 2006, 06:39 AM
But, the tradeoff is that if you get too small and conceal the gun too much, then 1) you can be left with a less effective less accurate gun that is 2) harder to get to and 3) a smaller gun will have more recoil. For instance, if you stick a short barreled baby Glock ISWB under an untucked shirt (for one thing, on certain given occasions that can look pretty sloppy) that can be pretty hard to get to trying to get your shirt tail up and out of the way and you don't have as long a barrel hurting your accuracy and lessening the velocity of the round. Or if you are carrying a Colt Agent in an ankle holster, sure that conceals pretty well, but you've got to get your leg up, hand down to leg and hand back up to shoot (and hope the pant leg doesn't get in the way).
You can easily carry a full sized pistol under a light shirt, you dont have to down size. Once you get used to IWB, its actually very comfortable with an autoloader, and can be OK with a revolver. There are holsters out there that keep the cylinder above the belt.

As for the shirt thing, with just a little practice, lifting your shirt is not at all hard and very quick. I do it by placing my hand on my thigh, palm flat, and slide it up, hooking the shirt with my thumb. In less time than it took to type this sentence, the gun is out.

Ankle holsters are a pain, in more than one way, but again, if you practice, can be pretty quick to access.

The key to any way you choose to carry is CONSTANT practice. If you have to think about drawing the gun, your not there yet.

Of the two basic type of shoulder holsters, the vertical is actually the harder to conceal, and really has no advantage over a good belt holster. The bottom of the holster is usually at or below belt level, and often pokes out like a belt holster when you raise your arms or bend forward.


The REAL trade-off is that if you get made one time too often you could easily end up not being able to carry ANY gun at all to work which would be a FAR worse trade-off than carrying a little gun in a harder to access concealment location.
I agree. You just had your "heads up". Your just lucky it worked out as it did. We tend to worry someone will see it and we will get in trouble. I look at it from another aspect, one where the person what saw it, wants it, and they now have the advantage of working on getting it and you dont even have a clue its coming, especially if your preoccupied, and not paying attention.

JohnKSa
October 14, 2006, 02:05 PM
According to the instructor or my most recent CCW class, that fear (in Texas) is totally unfounded from a practical standpoint because in all the years he's been teaching CCW classes and therefore constantly in contact with LEO's, he told us that he has never yet heard of even a single case where a CCW carrier was cited for an unintentional "flash".I'm not talking about losing your CHL--I agree that the odds of that are slim to none for printing or even for an inadvertant flash.

I'm talking about having your boss tell you that if you carry to work again you're fired. Or maybe just getting fired right off the bat.In the end, it seems that the majority of people who know about these things and have the experience to back it up are virtually unanimous about the idea that the best concealment comes from using very high quality IWB holsters along with a proper gun belt and not trying to carry an overly huge or heavy weapon.Yup, shoulder holsters have a "cool factor" that appeals to many, but they're only practical in very limited circumstances. Professionals who carry with a shoulder holster usually tailor (literally) their wardrobe to fit their carry choice.

smince
October 14, 2006, 03:13 PM
I carry IWB with a Colt Defender and carry a spare mag and a Surefire on the off side. Last year I was shopping for a new truck and got "made" by the salesman. He was a retired cop so I didn't feel bad about it. He also told me he didn't blame a person for carrying.

Once in my early carry days I had a black nylon shoulder holster and was carrying my BHP in it. While in a restaurant, several men kept looking in our direction. We didn't know why, until we were getting in my friends van. I had on a white windbreaker and if the light was just right he told me he could see the outline of the holster through it.:eek:

Just because it is covered doesn't mean it is concealed.

springmom
October 14, 2006, 03:38 PM
Shoulder holsters are often suggested for women who need to wear dresses, since pretty much any other on the body holster type is then out of the question. Women's Outlook. the NRA magazine for women shooters, had a big spread on this several months ago. For women, this can be a very good solution. But it requires two things: a good holster with minimal bulk, and a scarf or something to ensure that the holster doesn't peek up over the edge of the collar of her jacket.

ISTM that this is one mode of carry when being willing to spend some real bucks on a holster that really, really fits you is important. I don't wear dresses often enough to have gotten one yet, but I'm thinking about it for winter wear.

Springmom

Glenn E. Meyer
October 16, 2006, 12:37 PM
I've also heard from a CHL instructor that is in their organization that they never had a report of someone getting in trouble for printing.

Another problem with shoulder holsters is that if you are real close up, the reach across your chest is very, very easy to block by your opponent. Most trainers will instruct you in active retention and fighting positions for close up that would seem to be impossible with a shoulder holster.

Being caught does give you a touch of a thrill though (as long it doesn't get you in the paddy wagon and off to the slammer). The cute girl said - oh, wow!

snolden
October 25, 2006, 09:20 PM
shoulder holster works very well for a right handed person in a vehicle.

Aside from that I have no use for a shoulder holster and I did in fact try one for a couple months.

As soon as I bought my first quality leather IWB holster, I put my shoulder holster in my vehicle for road trip only use.

Daily Fred
November 18, 2006, 05:35 PM
We all probably get "made" a lot more than we think.

JohnKSa
November 18, 2006, 08:53 PM
With a good carry scheme and some discretion, it's possible to never get made. On the other hand, some people apparently want others to know that they're carrying and evidence that fact by telling folks.

http://www.texasshooting.com/TexasCHL_Forum/viewtopic.php?t=1819

Glenn E. Meyer
November 19, 2006, 07:23 PM
I saw today for the first time - a pair of jeans with a clear outline of a small gun worn into the back pocket.

It is also my opinion, flame suit on, that some fanny pack wearers like the idea that knowledgeable folks will spot them.

Am I without sin - does the Spyderco and Surefire peaking out on the pockets give a clue - perhaps. However, the other day the lights went out in an interior big room at work and the Surefire was sure useful. I don't know how many folks associated such gear with CHL unless they are tacticool like me! :D

smince
November 19, 2006, 07:47 PM
If I see a Surefire or a quality knife clipped to the pocket, I will give them a little more than a cursory glance. But I also realize that most with this type of equipment will be "good guys":D

njtrigger
November 19, 2006, 10:58 PM
Ive got a way to conceal a weapon without anyone knowing...

http://www.usgalco.com/HolsterT3.asp?ProductID=3044&CatalogID=382

I dont think anyone will know if your carrying it disguised as a planner.

45RackerTracker
November 20, 2006, 12:19 AM
Too hard to whip out when needed, too easy to snatch from you if distracted.;)

Daily Fred
November 20, 2006, 08:45 PM
:) I made one of those by reconfiguring one of those little cheapie toolkits that looks like a planner. It's nifty but not practical, as 45 says, too hard to draw and too easy to swipe.

Big Don
November 20, 2006, 09:28 PM
And I've got a bunch of 'em. As noted by a previous poster, I buy my clothes with CCW in mind and carry my compact Colt .45 in a Bianchi IWB that fits very well. I purchased a Galco SOB for my 9MM years ago and liked for walking around but found it pretty useless while driving or sitting in tight quarters. I'm spending more time on the road now and am thinking about a shoulder rig for the .45.
I'm a throw-back in that I still have a fanny pack for those occasions where other methods just won't work. It's smaller than most and I quite often sling it over my shoulder with the pouch in front. Most of the time, I don't give a rip and wear with pouch in front and have never had any hassles. Not my preferred method of CCW but it will do.
Question: Has anyone ever heard this little bit of folk lore: carrying a fanny pack in reasonable cause for LEO's to stop and ask you "What's in the bag, Goose?":D

UniversalFrost
November 20, 2006, 09:43 PM
If you are a guy and carrying a fanny pack I am sure it will bring the attention of people around you. Personnaly, when i can't carry IWB or OWB I use a nice little ankle holster with a colt detective snubby 38spl. Only got made out once with this ankle rig when i leaned over to tie a shoe lace on teh other leg and the pants leg came up a bit and exposed the bottom half of the holster. Luckily it was in an office room at work and 99% of the guys are nra members and 100% are prior service lifetime VFW members. Boss keeps telling me I need to switch to a .357 snubby instead of my .38spl.

As far as a shoulder holster, I only wore them when I was in the service. Many times I wore a drop leg thigh holster. Shoulder holster are hard to conceal unless you have very baggy clothing or wear a large coat all the time. Shoulder holsters are great for open carry though (which is legal and encouraged in my great state of SD):D ..

Glenn E. Meyer
November 21, 2006, 02:11 PM
Jan Libourel of Handguns and now Gun World told the tale of a Washington State CCW idiot who went to California wearing his fanny pack - despite advice not to. The local cops busted him, laughed when he produced the permit and arrested him.

Big Don
November 21, 2006, 02:54 PM
One has to wonder if this guy really had the smarts to warrant a CCW in the first place. He didn't bother to check on the rules of the state he was visiting, didn't listen to good advice and then flaunted his firearm (essentially) by wearing the fanny pack. Duh!:eek:

Daily Fred
November 21, 2006, 08:38 PM
How does one draw from an ankle holster?

Thedude
November 21, 2006, 08:50 PM
I found the problem with the IWB carry is that getting in and out of your vehicle...I was carrying, and had to take it out of my back waist everytime I got in my car, and put it back in every time I got out...It was kind of an akward move. Does anyone else have this problem?

smince
November 21, 2006, 09:41 PM
How does one draw from an ankle holster?
http://www.politesociety.com/ankle.htm
For right hand draw, holster is worn inside left ankle. To draw, drop to the knee of the
non gun leg while grabbing pants leg above the opposite knee to expose the gun for presentation at the same time giving you a stable, low profile shooting stance. Ankle holsters are also great for driving.

Dreadnought
November 22, 2006, 03:20 PM
I found the problem with the IWB carry is that getting in and out of your vehicle...I was carrying, and had to take it out of my back waist everytime I got in my car, and put it back in every time I got out...It was kind of an akward move. Does anyone else have this problem? IWB position varies depending on body size and stature, I being a slightly taller than average, portly fellow, tend to carry a full-sized semiauto at 3 o'clock to half past 3 in FBI-canted IWB holsters. The tilt of the butt forward keeps the heel of the grip far enough forward that my car seats' kidney bolsters (I drive VWs) do not push the grip when I sit down. If you drive a car with "race" seats or aggressive bolsters (i.e., many German cars), such as a Golf R32, Civic Si, et c., it might not work so well. You might just need to play around with your rig's positioning. If you have a SOB IWB, then you're SOL.