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bennnn
September 24, 2006, 07:15 PM
Can anyone give me some advice, or provide me with a few links regarding how to clean up the action of a yugo sks trigger group? I have heard others mention this and I'm curious about where to begin.

DnPRK
September 24, 2006, 10:44 PM
I use a large soup can, mineral spirits, a spray can of carburetor cleaner and an old toothbrush.

Take the rifle apart.
Wipe away as much cosmolene as possible using paper towels.
Put the parts in the old soup can and fill it half way full of mineral spirits, letting them soak.
Pull out one part at a time and scrub it with the toothbrush (don't leave the toothbrush in the solvent because it will melt).
Use the carb cleaner with straw attachment on the nozzle to blow cosmolene out of the nooks and crannies that the toothbrush cannot get.
Set the cleaned part aside to dry.

bennnn
September 24, 2006, 11:43 PM
Thanks for the reply but that's not what I meant at all. I meant polishing and smoothing up the action of the trigger for better performance, I keep hearing others mention a "trigger job" that's what I'm looking for info on, thanks though, do you know anything about that?

Hedley
September 25, 2006, 05:46 PM
http://www.surplusrifle.com/reviews/wolffsksspring/index.asp
or
http://www.kivaari.com/

T. O'Heir
September 25, 2006, 10:39 PM
Hi. A trigger job involves polishing all the mating hammer and trigger parts. No metal removal or changing any angles, just removing tool marks and smoothing the steel. You can just change the springs too. Wolf Springs sells a kit for a princely $9 for the SKS. http://www.gunsprings.com/RifleShotgun/SKS_RsNF.html

bennnn
September 26, 2006, 07:28 PM
Hedley, straight to the point with great info as always!! You're a real pal Hedley. By the way, you are the first person I talked to here on TFL, when we were chatting about the wasr-10's tendency to chew up projectiles. You gave me a great first impression of the culture on this site. Thanks man.


T. O'Heir, thanks so much for breaking it down for me, that answered my main question about where to start. I AM going to order a set of those springs, the price sure is right.. Any advice/opinions as to what is the best polishing agent for the job at hand?

sleeping dog
October 3, 2006, 05:06 PM
Is there some kind of trick, or "idiot's guide" to dismantling a SKS trigger group? I tried (sorta) to take one apart, then figured the hammer spring was so strong that if I got it apart I'd never get it together.

Taking apart a M1 Garand trigger group was a piece of cake by comparison.

Regards.

bennnn
October 3, 2006, 05:16 PM
Here is the link straight to some really detailed info about taking it all apart,
it's great.. When you do, it's worth it to spend the few dollars to get the lighter springs, as well as doing the polish job.. I have had a definite improvement in accuracy after doing both to my Yugo..
http://www.surplusrifle.com/reviews/wolffsksspring/index.asp

Al Thompson
October 3, 2006, 07:02 PM
http://www.tech-sights.com/

:)

Beretta92
October 3, 2006, 07:11 PM
Have a Look Here http://www.sksboards.com/forum/ There's an area were Fragger the SKS Guru gives instructions on how to clean up the triggers on SKSs
SKSs are great Rifles for the Money..
Gary/B92

Hedley
October 5, 2006, 12:05 AM
Hedley, straight to the point with great info as always!! You're a real pal Hedley. By the way, you are the first person I talked to here on TFL, when we were chatting about the wasr-10's tendency to chew up projectiles. You gave me a great first impression of the culture on this site. Thanks man.

Hey man, just saw that post and it's no problem at all. I'm a bit of a gun noob and I try to soak up as much info as possible here, so any advice I can give makes me feel less worthless.:) For SKS related questions, I always defer to Survior's SKS boards like Beretta said. I do tend to stay away from the Tinfoil hat threads though.

Kivaari
February 3, 2008, 03:33 PM
Smoothing is good.

Better yet is smooth, consistent, minimal creep, AND the correct engagement between hammer and sear so when the creep (factory safety :^) is gone, it's safe as well. Nice when the first stage is minimal, too.