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View Full Version : Stripping finish off Remington stock.


PinnedAndRecessed
August 20, 2006, 11:40 PM
I want a chemical stripper to take off the space age strong-as-steel plastic finish on my Remington 700 BDL stock.

Suggestions?

hoghunting
August 21, 2006, 12:06 AM
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=4984&title=CERTISTRIP

dfaugh
August 21, 2006, 07:14 AM
I've used regular Strip-EZ, from the local hardware store to rmove pretty much any finish I've encountered (both guns and furniture) Some just come off more easily than others.

Unclenick
August 21, 2006, 12:31 PM
Epoxies and urethanes are eventually softened by anything containing methylene chloride. Check the ingredients. Methylene chloride evaporates quickly, so you have to keep refreshing with a brush.

Nick

PinnedAndRecessed
August 21, 2006, 03:01 PM
Thanx, guys.

My Remington stock has a black plastic forend tip. Do I need to take any special precautions with that?

tINY
August 21, 2006, 04:03 PM
Probably want to keep the stripper off of it and sand it down by hand.




-tINY

cntryboy1289
August 21, 2006, 06:45 PM
Cover it with tape and then when you get it stripped and sanded, and refinished, remove the tape. If you have to do any heavy sanding, make sure you sand on the edges of it as well without the tape on it.

Harry Bonar
August 22, 2006, 07:13 PM
Dear Sir:
Yes, Brownells sells a stripper that works!

However, I remember in my youth sitting in my basement with a piece of broken glass scraping finish off!
It's much easier today.
Harry B.

Toolman
August 22, 2006, 08:52 PM
You should remove any plastic or metal parts before using chemical stripper. If you use a chemical you'll need to use water afterwards and that will raise the grain, which requires plenty of sanding. I have not used broken glass to remove finishes but have used a steel scraper and it worked fine but required some elbow grease. The scraper didn't raise the grain either.

4V50 Gary
August 22, 2006, 10:50 PM
Consider that that glossy stuff is an excellent sealant that makes your stock more weather proof. I'd paint over it instead, but that's cheapo me.

hoghunting
August 23, 2006, 12:17 AM
If you want a duller finish, don't remove the epoxy finish. You can dull or matte it by using rottenstone - http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/productdetail.aspx?p=7781&s=4053

Make a paste with the rottenstone and vegetable oil - some people use linseed oil, but vegetable oil works as well without a big mess. Put the paste on the stock and rub it in using felt pads - http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/productdetail.aspx?p=12713&s=

Rub the paste into the stock with some pressure and wipe it off. If the finish is not dull enough, rub some more. It's a lot easier than stripping and refinishing the stock.

PinnedAndRecessed
August 24, 2006, 05:02 PM
Probably want to keep the stripper off of it and sand it down by hand.


Could you be more specific? What's wrong with chemical strippers on gunstocks?

cntryboy1289
August 24, 2006, 06:29 PM
There is nothing wrong with using stripper and it will prevent the problem of having the wood below the metal because of excessive sanding. I use a citrus stripper when I strip a stock and have no problems with it at all. check out the selection at your local hardware store or Lowes or Home Depot. They have a large assortment of various strippers. Get the one that will remove your finish the best and not have toxic fumes and you will be fine.

Scraping like Harry does does very well also. This is just a lot quicker and easier.

weagle
August 24, 2006, 11:48 PM
Citristrip is the stuff you want to use for that remington stock. I've done several and it wont hurt the black plastic forend at all. Just slop it on thick, wrap the stock in aluminum foil and wait 30 minutes. Use a littlemore fresh stripper and a stiff nylon brush to clean out the checkering and you are good to go. I have only had to reapply it once and that was on a Remington BDL stock that I didn't let the stripper work long enough. It's great stuff.

Weagle

http://aycu04.webshots.com/image/2483/2004875628225690809_rs.jpg

http://aycu04.webshots.com/image/1723/2004858944718023599_rs.jpg

http://aycu24.webshots.com/image/863/2003798801626252185_rs.jpg

Unclenick
August 27, 2006, 10:09 PM
Interesting post. Since I haven't tried it I have a couple of questions: How does the Citristrip do about stock swelling? I thought it was water base, or is it just citrus oils and emulsifiers that allow water rinsing? Do you find you need to do anything along the lines of desiccating the wood to dry it afterward? Do I correctly infer from the can of mineral spirits that you are using that product rather than water to remove the Citrustrip afterward?

Nick

cntryboy1289
August 28, 2006, 12:00 AM
Nick, I haven't had any trouble with the stocks that I strip. I make sure to let them dry for about a week before to make sure any moisture is out. I hang mine close to the ceiling to dry, but a drying box is handy if you have one. If you let the water soak on the stock, of course it will enter the wood. I wash mine with lacquer thinner and then use a wash cloth with clean water and a heat gun to raise the grain before finish sanding the stocks.

The stripping process saves me more than a few hours of labor and the results have been just as good as what I used to turn out when scraping and sanding the finish off.

weagle
August 28, 2006, 05:43 PM
I use the mineral spirits to clean up the stock. I don't use any water at all.

I haven't experienced any stock swelling and the stocks are dry and ready to proceed in 24 hours.

Weagle

cntryboy1289
August 28, 2006, 08:18 PM
Do you not raise the grain prior to reapplying the new finish? I do because I sand a little before I apply the new finish and I raise the grain before. The way I do it though doesn't add a lot of moisture back into the stock. I never wash the stock in water either, I apply a damp rag and heat to raise the grain.

weagle
August 28, 2006, 11:16 PM
Yes, I do wipe the stock with a damp cloth to raise the grain when I'm sanding it, but this is later in the process. I was referring to the stripping process and clean up when I stated I didn't use any water.

Weagle

T. O'Heir
August 30, 2006, 01:23 AM
"...keep the stripper off of it and sand it down by hand..." Absolutely not. Takes forever and doesn't get the plastic out of the wood. Wood is wood. You use the same products and techniques you'd use on furniture.

tINY
August 30, 2006, 03:28 AM
But some chemical strippers may eat the plastic cap on the end. Unless you know for sure, keeping harsh solvents off of that part may be a good idea.




-tINY

PinnedAndRecessed
August 31, 2006, 10:12 PM
Hoghunting said,

If you want a duller finish, don't remove the epoxy finish. You can dull or matte it by using rottenstone - http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/sto...?p=7781&s=4053

Make a paste with the rottenstone and vegetable oil - some people use linseed oil, but vegetable oil works as well without a big mess. Put the paste on the stock and rub it in using felt pads - http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/sto...spx?p=12713&s=

Rub the paste into the stock with some pressure and wipe it off. If the finish is not dull enough, rub some more. It's a lot easier than stripping and refinishing the stock.

Hog, what's the ratio of vege oil to rottenstone?

And, do you just rub until it looks the way you want?

Have you used this and does it look like some of the more expensive hand rubbed finishes?

hoghunting
September 2, 2006, 10:34 AM
P&R,

You don't have to be exact on the ratio of the mix, just mix it so that it is like toothpaste or just a little thinner. Use the felt pads and rub it in the stock. It removes the sheen from the glossy finish and leaves a matte or satin finish. A buddy stripped his Rem stock and refinished it and it was a lot of work. I read about the rottenstone on a shotgun forum and tried it on my Browning. I was very pleased with the finish and it was not near the amount of work my buddy did.

Bill DeShivs
September 2, 2006, 04:54 PM
An easier method is to rub the stock down with 0000 steel wool.
Bill

skeeter1
September 2, 2006, 10:12 PM
I'm hardly a smithy, but I do dabble in refinishing furniture now and again.

The one rifle I did, I removed all of the hardware, rubbed the stock down liberally with fine sandpaper, and applied several coats of tung oil, with a bit of work with 000 steel wool between each coat. It still looked pretty good when I gave it away to a young shooter 30 years later.

I do what I can to take care of my firearms, and always do what I can to welcome a new shooter into the fold. The young man welcomed that old .22, and now he can go out shooting with his dad and "his own gun."

hoghunting
September 3, 2006, 11:24 PM
P&R,

Whichever method you use, just be sure to rub with the grain and not in a circular pattern.