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Maximus856
August 5, 2006, 01:00 PM
Say theres a situation with your neighbors... Like a gunshot or two. Do you simply stay at your house and do nothing but maybe call the police, or do you take your prefered weapon and assess the situation, knowing full well that it could be your neighbors life on the line. Obviously you'll call the police, but do you take action.

*Personally* I couldn't live with myself knowing I may of made a differance. I'd secure my house, make sure my family is safe, and then do what I had to to make sure my neighbors were ok.

Am I wrong in thinking this?

-Max.

PS. This is a residential neighborhood, so theres no recreational shooting going on.

cpaspr
August 5, 2006, 01:16 PM
Your first responsibility is to your family. Therefore, trying to be a macho hero to your neighbors may get you real dead, real fast when the cops do arrive and see you outside the house with a gun. If it's a bad guy doing the shooting next door, either the neighbor or an externally introduced BG (burglery gone bad, druggy picking the wrong house, etc.) and they come across you as they're attempting to make an exit, you may not even survive for the cops to find wandering around.

No, protect your family and survive for them. Notify police and let them do their job. Most residential areas (ouside of the "big" cities), a report of "shots fired" will get quick response.

Now if the shooter moves next door to your house, well, then you're back to protect yours.

The Real Wyatt
August 5, 2006, 01:17 PM
Call the cops, arm yourself and stay alert ... but stay home.

I'm willing to die for my family but I ain't willing to die for my neighbor.

JohnKSa
August 5, 2006, 01:17 PM
My feeling is that interjecting your armed self into a situation you know nothing about up front has lots of potential negative outcomes.

One of the reasons that civilians shoot innocent people less often than police is that the civilians are typically on the scene during the entire scenario. That gives them better insight into the intricacies of the situation than the police who usually arrive after the fact and have to rapidly sort out a chaotic situation with very little in the way of good information.

By going looking for the situation, you put yourself into the same sort of situation that causes police to have a higher risk of shooting someone who doesn't deserve to be shot.

I'd certainly poke my head out the door if the noise (possible shooting) continues and try to determine if there's a threat to my family or to assess what I could about the situation, but I'd be disinclined to go wandering around the neighborhood with a pistol looking for trouble (so to speak.)

If there were something going on in my own yard, that might be a different story, but I'd still be VERY careful about jumping into a volatile scenario until I could figure out what was going on.

Epyon
August 5, 2006, 01:19 PM
Depends on the neighbor I guess. If he's a real mean hermit kind of person that hates just about everyone I'd be less inclined to help him with a firearm, I'd still call the cops to report the crime, but I'm not risking my skin for someone who is just ungrateful. Now on the other hand if my neighbor was a good friend, one of those guys I can have big BBQs with and have a beer with, I'd probably be more inclined to risk it to help them. Now the question is, is the neighbor a firearms owner or not? If my neighbor was not a firearms owner and I heard gunshots, and I was the only person that could save them because the cops would get there too late, I'd probably go in. Those are my opinions, and that's all I have to say about that!:)


Epyon

Mannlicher
August 5, 2006, 01:57 PM
If I hear a gunshot next door, I am calling 911. All you have to report is 'shots fired', and the address. Let the cops sort it out.
Shots fired in a home nextdoor can have a significant impact on your family. I am NOT going to arm myself, and waltz over to find out whats going on.

General P.
August 5, 2006, 02:05 PM
Stay home and protect your family, but call police (unless your neighbor is a Firing Line member, at which he is probably just poping a few off for practice). If my neighbors called the fuzz each time they heard a shot, the police would be sending me a bill for gasoline.:D
But if it happened at night, would call the police and stay home. Could get shot by them if they mistook me for a perp.

j-framer
August 5, 2006, 02:34 PM
Epyon, it was disappointing to see you introduce something as petty as someone's social inclinations ("hermit") into a decision about whether to lend him/her assistance or not.

Though I too would be loath to help out an ingrate, aside from this, I would no more sympathize with a "burgers and beer" good ol' boy than I would with someone who valued solitude, and who had little use for the trivial diversions that you apparently esteem highly--highly enough to weigh them during a potential life and death situation.

Not that one is ever obliged to help, anyway, but it seems tragically small-minded to let such things affect the choice.

Off topic, but needed to be said.

springmom
August 5, 2006, 03:59 PM
1) secure your home and family
2) call 911

If you are not LEO, you have no business going out hunting trouble. The police are trained to intervene and have the authority to do so. You don't.

Springmom

Epyon
August 5, 2006, 04:07 PM
you're right, good call.:o


Epyon

PythonGuy
August 5, 2006, 04:40 PM
Another "I should have gone to the movies" rather then make this dumb post, post. :cool:

John28226
August 5, 2006, 04:41 PM
I know my neighbors and my neighborhood - there is only one way in and out with my house being at the end of the cul-de-sac. I know the hours they keep and the cars they drive - and their children by name. When they are out of town, we get their mail and paper and water their plants - as well as watch out for their house - when we are out of town they do the same for us.

The sound of shooting inside one of their houses would prompt two telephone calls, the first to 911; the second to my neighbor (from my cellular phone) while I am heading out the door.

No need to "arm myself" as I am already armed. As I am going out the door, my wife, who by now has her 637 and has locked the bedroom door, will be calling 911 again to give them my description and keep them on the phone until a car arrives.

What I do when I get to the house depends a lot on events up to that point including whether I get an answer on their phone. I have a key to one of the houses next to mine - the other I only have the alarm code for when they are out of town.

Obviously if your situation is different and you don't feel comfortable taking any action other than calling 911, then you should do that which you feel is best.

On my part, however, I will check to ensure that everything is O.K. or I will address whatever comes up as it comes up.

John
Charlotte, NC

silicon wolverine
August 5, 2006, 05:29 PM
Yet another silly scenario thread.

SW

atlctyslkr
August 5, 2006, 05:54 PM
Call the cops and tell them there is a shootout next door. Give your physical description and tell them you fear for your neighbor's saftey and are going to lend assistance. Wouldn't you want someone to do the same for you.

Maximus856
August 5, 2006, 06:35 PM
Yet another silly scenario thread.

SW


So silly because I don't live 5 minutes from a drug ridden 'ghetto' though in a nice residential neighborhood. In this area, the possibility of the 'silly scenario' is far from being just another 'silly scenario.'

-Max.

BillCA
August 5, 2006, 06:40 PM
Well, shucks... nice move folks.

One of the arguments used against anti-gun folks is the concept that armed neighbors constitute a potential hazard to would-be miscreants. I guess we can just flush that argument down the toilet and forget it.

It has been argued that part of the deterrent effect is because a nearby gun-owning neighbor may disrupt the crime with the outcome the capture of the thug or (again) turning him into a statistic. Based on the sampling of responses here, the thug has about an 82% chance of succeeding.

Any one of the sheeple can call 911 and become a peek-between-the-drapes witness. And in many cities, the end result will be your name as a witness on a crime report while they process the scene and broadcast the escaped BG's description.

Gunfire from a neighbor's home means something is wrong. It could be a negligent discharge (anyone hurt?), a self-defense situation or your neighbor on the short end of the stick.

No one advocates rushing in willy-nilly, however being in a position of cover and yelling to your neighbors that help is coming may disrupt criminal activity. Having your own weapon discretely holstered allows you to defend yourself if necessary. If your neighbor responds with a cry for assistance you can proceed as your training, experience and judgement allows.

springmom
August 5, 2006, 07:36 PM
But Bill, you do not know what you are walking into. In order to try to get a mental picture of this, I tried to think "what if" the shots were coming from OUR house...what would I want our neighbors to do?

Well, in our family, it wouldn't be a domestic disturbance, so it would either be a ND or a BG. I'll leave the ND question aside for the moment. If I have a BG in the house, I *do not want* my neighbors walking in trying to come help. Why? Because I am armed, I am ready to shoot or have already shot, and adrenaline is squirting out my ears. ANYBODY that walked in that isn't LEO is in danger of catching the next bullet. If they come to the door and call out "Hey, it's Mike" (our next door neighbor), then they are in danger from the BG. In other words, helpful neighbors coming over are going to create danger for themselves, and are unlikely to be able to help.

There is one exception: our across-the-street neighbor is LEO. Our youngest son has been drilled that, should someone break in the the night, he is to bail out his window immediately and do his best to get over to this guy's house. HIM, I want coming over. Anyone else, I don't want to have to worry about their safety as well as my family's.

What about setting up to prevent a BG escape? Again, it sounds great...until Neighbor #1 shoots Neighbor #2 while they're both shooting at the BG, because lo and behold they've got a crossfire situation set up. LEO's know how to do this without blowing each other to Kingdom Come. My neighbors probably don't.

Finally, let's assume the neighbors are out there trying to help while the LEOs arrive. The neighbors are now between the LEOs and us, and are in danger of being mistaken for BGs at worst, or even at best being in the way of what the police need to be doing.

I am not a police officer. I do not play one on TV, even if I do wish I looked like Mariska Hargitay :rolleyes: I am not qualified to come to your rescue in your house if I hear gunfire. I wish I was, but I am not, and the truth is, if I try, I may get us both killed.

But I will call 911, because that's the most useful thing I *can* do.

Springmom

OneInTheChamber
August 5, 2006, 08:18 PM
Bad idea:

1. You could get shot by the BG.
2. You could get shot by responding LEO's who see you entering a house with a weapon where someone was just assaulted. They will assume you are the BG.
3. You could get shot by the neighbor who mistook you for the BG.
4. You could be held liable legally or financially responsible for shooting a BG not on your own property (Depends on state and local laws).

You look out for you and yours. If it happens you can *safely* intervene to save a life, go ahead. I'm not risking my life for the neighbor's TV.

BillCA
August 5, 2006, 10:33 PM
All very good points by Springmom & OneInTheChamber.

As I said, we don't advocate blindly charging in to the unknown. Making contact with the neighbor inside is one step. Keeping concealed or behind cover is another. Determining who's injured is yet another. Relaying all of this to the PD is a key element.

4. You could be held liable legally or financially responsible for shooting a BG not on your own property (Depends on state and local laws).

I think you'll find that limitations to one's own property are dismissed when responding to screams or calls for help under the "reasonable man" doctrine. Even California has exceptions in the Penal Code for armed response to situations where a reasonable man would consider it "prudent".

JohnKSa
August 6, 2006, 12:12 AM
I would say that if a person feels that they must get involved if there is a situation like the one posed, they need to PREpare.

Do you know your neighbors? How many of them do you know? (Hint: How far away can you hear a shot?)

Do your neighbors know you? When you end up in their front yard that is now a crime scene and the police acost you and find you have a weapon (remember gunshots were just fired) is the neighbor going to vouch for you or tell the cops he has no idea who you are? Are you going to be able to prove who you are? (Hint: Do you normally carry ID around the house when you're at home?)

Do you know if the car parked in front of the house belongs to the resident?

Do you know if the kid running down the street is a stranger or one of your neighbor's relatives?

Can you legally carry off your property? Did you remember to bring your CHL/CCW permit with you when you grabbed your gun and flashlight?

Are you carrying concealed? If not, is it legal to open carry in your area? In TX, not even a permit will let you carry a handgun openly off your own property. (Hints: Do you normally wear a concealment garment around the house or have one near the door? Do you normally have a holster on or have one near the door?)

Does your spouse know what to do when you run out the front door to investigate gunshots? Are they going to tag along in pajamas to make sure you're ok? Call 911? What will they tell 911 if they do call? What about your kids? Are you gonna have to fight with them to keep them from coming investigating with you? Are they going to run out in the yard to see what's going on after you leave?

If you feel obligated to be security for the neighborhood, you'd better know your neighbors and your neighborhood VERY well or you're going to be more of a nuisance (at best) than a help.

You'd also better know the laws in your area and make sure that you comply.

You'd also better formulate a plan for what family members are to do in such a situation so that it doesn't turn into a goat-rope.

Taking care of you and yours is not a simple task. Things get a lot more complicated if you're going to try to take care of the neighborhood too. It's going to require a lot of preparation and at least a minimal level of continued effort to keep track of new neighbors, kids coming back from college, new car purchases, etc.

I'll say it again. Interjecting your armed self into a crime scene is a touchy operation with a lot of potential for negative outcome.

Doubletaptap
August 6, 2006, 01:22 AM
First I want to say, I wish I lived next to Springmom. She's smart and sounds like a great person to have as a neighbor!!
I don't live too far from her but too far for her to help me if a situation occured.


Now as for the scenario, Arm yourself, secure your home,call 911 and report shots fired,stay on the line with them if you can and observe and report.
If you do go outside,stay in your own yard. Heck maybe you'll get lucky and get to shoot the BG's tires out as he tries to flee the scene!!!

Your best help will be on the phone with the law. Giving addresses,descriptions and updates as they occur. This will help the law do their job faster and may result in a arrest!!

Of course they'll release the BG on his own recognisance because of jails being overcrowded!!:barf:

silicon wolverine
August 6, 2006, 11:48 AM
I had a staff member admonish me (and rightly so) for posing the scenario of a BG in burger king shoot/no shoot. Thread was subsequently locked. I dont understand how this is different. I would like the staff to post EXACTLY what the limits are to "senario" talk. Perhaps that would limit the argument.

SW

PythonGuy
August 6, 2006, 05:56 PM
This thread will be locked too, this is just another "how can I use my gun" thread thinly disguised as "but I HAVE to help my neighbor". There are so many variables, did the neighbor have a ND? Are they in trouble or is it a domestic? in which case who shot who? Springmom's observations were exactly correct, people who are also licensed gun owners must avoid "The Long Ranger" syndrome. We're ready Mod's, lock at will......:D

Topthis
August 6, 2006, 06:08 PM
Happened to me. It came from a neighbor that I did not know very well. I just called 911 (do did a few others) and the police came VERY quickly and resolved the situation. According to the police, it was an A.D. and they did not say much more.
If it had been a neighbor that I knew well...I don't think I would have done much different other than calling my neighbor after calling 911.
Running into an unknown situation with shots fired...having a handgun with me...sounds like more trouble than help. My opinion. Heck, in my opinion, if you really love your family...then stay and make sure that they are protected and safe, also, if you love your family, why place yourself in a situation that may get you killed or seriously injured...or do something that may cause you to get sued.

tony pasley
August 6, 2006, 06:37 PM
what if le is over 30 mins. away i live in the country and know both my nieghbors in fact all 3 within .5 miles we look out for each other and even who come up the road.

gb_in_ga
August 6, 2006, 07:11 PM
Say theres a situation with your neighbors... Like a gunshot or two. Do you simply stay at your house and do nothing but maybe call the police, or do you take your prefered weapon and assess the situation, knowing full well that it could be your neighbors life on the line. Obviously you'll call the police, but do you take action.

I'd stay put, armed and alert, and call 911, unless it turns out that my neighbor contacts me and actually asks for my aid. My main responsibility is to the safety of myself and SWMBO. Besides that, if gunshots have already occurred, chances are that the damage has already been done.

As far as I know, all of my neighbors are also armed to some extent, so it isn't as if they are helpless. My barging in and getting directly involved might end up with ME getting shot as well, by the BG(s) or even by my neighbor. And, this is suburban area where the police station is only about 2 or 3 miles away. Best thing to do is stay put and on alert, maybe keep an eye out for a vehicle ID or something.

This is assuming that nothing is visible from the outside -- in other words, that the gunshots aren't happening as part of an open air incident for all to see. If I could actually see that an assault of some sort was happening and that my action might actually be of some real benefit, then I just might dive into the fray after calling the law. Kinda hard to stay out of it in that sort of situation. Ga law provides for such action in response to a felony in progress. Nah, after I think about it I'd get SWMBO to call 911 while I tried to intervene.

VUPDblue
August 6, 2006, 08:30 PM
I once awoke to some strange sounds. I armed myself and looked outside, then I went outside to see what was going on. I saw someone breaking the windows in my next door neighbor's home. I was in a very concealed position in my own yard with an excellent view of my neighbors home and all exits. I kept still and phoned the local PD while still observing. They arrived with the quickness. Turned out to be a bitter ex breaking in for some unknown reason. They hauled her off and all was quiet.

prater
August 13, 2006, 02:52 AM
I think the first call I would make would be to the neighbors, after all you don't know for sure if it was a gunshot, then if they didn't answer, I'd probably call 911, or if they did but I still wasn't satisfied that all was well I would call 911. When it comes to infiltrating a home, the defender normally has the upper hand
(the high ground in this situation), and I'm not trained in tactical operations. Now if I was a S.W.A.T. team member or a cop in general then I might react differently. but I'm not...yet.

svtruth
August 13, 2006, 04:03 PM
the odds of an in the house gunshot or shots in a non-ghetto neighborhood are either ND or domestic violence. I don't see how showing up with guns will help either one.

Big Calhoun
August 13, 2006, 05:39 PM
I've looked at this thread and it is actually a pretty good question. Having lived in townhomes or condos most of my life, based on my experience, I would say that it ultimately depends on your neighbor and whatkind of relationship you have with them.

#1 Had a nieghbor back in New Jersey. Older gentlemen who lived alone and had a host of medical problems. I was pretty friendly with this gent so in his case, I kind of did act like an extra eye. Because of his condition (age, medical, etc.), I would have investigated if something didn't seem right. A couple of times over the years, I had rushed down after hearing a bang or crash. It was usually him knocking something over (God bless him). But again, because of his condition and the circumstances, I wouldn't have felt comfortable if something happened and I ignored it.

#2 Where I live now, completely different case. Most of the folks that live here are young adults to middle age. THe community is gated and requires an access card to get in. So things are fairly safe although there have been some strange goings on lately. Anywho, my neighbor now...I would completly play the witness role.

With my first neighbor, we knew each others routines. So I could easy tell if something was amiss. WIth my current neighbor, she's a rather strange bird, to say the least. I don't know what her normal 'routine' is because she doesn't seem to have one. Makes no sense eyeing who comes to the hallway b/c she seems very...'popular'. So given all this, in this scenario, I'd be more worried about securing my wife and house and being the best witness possible. I'm going to go for my handgun incase the situation 'spills over' but I wouldn't proactively enter the situation unless I felt there was a dire need (eg. her screaming bloody murder or something).

But I do think this is a very valid scenario for discussion for neighboorhoods are so different from place to place. Some are very community oriented, so neighbors may be more apt to check on one another. Others, like here, are more private, so it's kind of...worry about yourself.

revjen45
August 13, 2006, 08:45 PM
We hear shots from our neighbor's house all the time. Finally my wife asked what they were shooting at, fearing it might be our cat. Turns out they were just blasting grackles in their bird feeder and scaring away the buzzards that whitewash their walls. The neighbothood busybody told the cops it was us. If I hear shots I will close all the windows, turn up the TV and deny hearing anything.

psssniper
August 13, 2006, 09:36 PM
I dont think that this is a silly sceanario thread, it happened at the top of our cul-de-sac a couple years ago. Lanlord-tenant dispute, shots fired, a neighbor runs over to see whats happening and he gets killed, landlord survives, tenant take their own life. A hell of a mess and a senseless death.
This is an area where houses run around 800K so it aint the ghetto.

squirrelsniper
August 14, 2006, 12:30 AM
I guess it depends on where you live. I live in the country with a lot of other folks who like hunting and shooting. Hearing gunshots is pretty much a daily occurrence. Even at night it's common to hear a gunshot, as someone's trying to keep oppossums out of their garbage cans or trying to get coyotes to leave their livestock alone. If I called the PD every time I heard gunshots, they'd get tired of me calling.

So, in my area, as long as the gunshots don't sound like they're on my property, I don't do squat. Pretty much everyone around here is armed anyway and are quite adept at taking care of their own business. I'd be more likely to get myself shot by going to check on them.

Now that I think about it, I can see why I like where I live :D

snolden
August 14, 2006, 10:54 AM
Two main points here:
ONE: The time to perform this scenario is before the gunshots occur. Talk to and meet your neighbors. Find out which ones are receptive to a mutual aid group. Set it up that only a CALL to your for help or other signal will cause you to come over armed to help.

TWO: If YOU ever go into a "shots fired" situation with only a handgun, you deserve to be shot. A shotgun or rifle is the minimum armament required here.

Me, I don't plan to help anyone other than family at this point. But I am NOT going into a shots fired situation without a long gun and hopefully a vest.

M1911
August 14, 2006, 12:01 PM
Let me see if I understand this thread. There's shots fired in a neighbors house. You probably don't know the floorplan well. You don't know what's going on -- could be a domestic, could be a break-in, who knows. You haven't been trained in house clearing, but you're going to go charging in anyways?

Basic rule of house clearing, btw, is that clearing a house by yourself is suicide.

No thanks. I'll arm myself, secure my house, call the police, watch and wait.

PythonGuy
August 14, 2006, 01:49 PM
I think the logical reply here would be to call the neighbor and ask if things are OK. If you don't know your neighbor well enough to have their number, you have no business going over. Call the Police and watch to see if you can get any "evidence" if there is actually a crime being committed. The one exception I can see is if you live in a truly rural area where you are close friends with the neighbors and an understanding exists that you will provide mutual protection due to the remote location. In other cases you just can't go out "half-cocked with your gun to investigate potential situations.

wolfy692005
August 21, 2006, 05:43 PM
sorry, but if my neighbor has shots fired from his house, i'm helping... no if's and's or but's about it..
that is how America was founded and what it stands for..
everyone is out for #1.. if a couple more would help out #2 just a little, things would be a lot better..
sorry rant off

springmom
August 21, 2006, 06:10 PM
It's about not screwing up FOR THEM as well as for yourself. Please read my earlier comments. Unless you are a LEO, you are not trained to go into a house where you don't know what's happened. Unless you're LEO, I do not WANT you coming riding to my rescue because I may end up SHOOTING YOU thinking you're another bad guy. Or you may get shot by the police arriving who will think the same thing.

It sounds good to say this, but there are far more bad outcomes possible here than good ones.

Springmom

Edward429451
August 21, 2006, 06:25 PM
Don't be sorry wolfy, you're right and have a good attitude.

People should be willing to help their neighbor. Do we know our neighbors though? A lot of people do not and keep to themselves. Can anyone even name their neighbors and distant relatives that visit them?

How could you realistically expect to be able to help if you went to the neighbors and do not know who's who? That longhaired dude standing in the livingroom looking scraggly might be the son, or daughters BF who just ND'd innocently and you startle him coming in the door so he turns toward you with a gun in his hand...

Or he might be a meth-head who has just shot a resident in a home invasion and you're there in time to save the rest of the fam...

So unless you know your neighbors, you're damned if you do and damned if you don't. Paradox. So go get to know your neighbors. At least then you might have a clue if you could help. Extend them an olive branch and tell them why. If you get the cold shoulder, be wary of them and stay home if their place gets lively. I know most of my neighbors. Had their kids come meet our dog(s), they know who are kids are, their friends, number of people here and all that. Makes sense to me.

John28226
August 22, 2006, 07:09 PM
Springmom, normally I agree with what you write. I do not, however, in this case. But that is me. If you were my neighbor I think you would know what I look like and I am reasonably certain that I would know you by sight.

I also do not agree with the tendency to say "unless you are LE you are not trained .....". While that is no doubt true for many it, like so many blanket statements, is not true for all. This is kinda like saying, "Unless you are a paramedic or a doctor you should let the person bleed (or lay there) and just call 911. You might make it worse!" You might and you might not.

When I read posts like this I often wonder if some of the passengers on Flight 93 said, "Oh, I am not qualified to do anything. Maybe if we just sit here nicely everything will be alright." I guess we will never know.

I think Edward got it right - know your neighbord before there is an emergency and most likely you will have a pretty good indication of how to react to a potential problem. If you think it best to call 911 and peek out the window, then do it; but if you think you really need to do something else to possibly be of help, then most likely that is what you should do.

No one that I read was suggesting rushing blindly into the house with your gun in your hand. In this situation it is partly common sense and partly training - too little of either might be a problem.

That is where I stand on this issue but one last thing, I have not heard shots fired and investigated but I have had that call at 1 A.M. in the morning from a neighbor whose husband was out of town. She told me that someone was trying to get into the house and she was scared they would get in and harm her or the two small children. Of course I went while my wife was on the telephone with 911 telling them the man with the shotgun was me.

John
Charlotte, NC

JohnKSa
August 23, 2006, 12:45 AM
If you were my neighbor I think you would know what I look like and I am reasonably certain that I would know you by sight.I know my next door neighbors to the south. I know the neighbors across the street & to the south.

That's it. Next door neighbors to the North and those directly across the street moved in recently and I haven't seen them enough to recognize any of them--likewise I doubt they'd recognize me.When I read posts like this I often wonder if some of the passengers on Flight 93 said, "Oh, I am not qualified to do anything. Maybe if we just sit here nicely everything will be alright." I guess we will never know.Inaccurate analogy. Those people knew the situation--it was very clear what was happening, and more to the point what would happen if they didn't act.

When you arm yourself and head out your front door at the sound of shots, you don't know ANYTHING about the situation and you have no idea whether or not your actions will help or make it worse.

I pointed this out earlier but it's worth repeating. Armed citizens have a much better record than the police when it comes to shooting the right person in an armed confrontation. That is because the armed citizen was almost certainly on the scene and knew the score while the cop came later and had to try to figure things out under stress and probably with very little time to assess.

When you interject yourself into the middle (spatially and chronologically) of a situation, you're putting yourself into the kind of quandary that results in cops sometimes shooting the wrong person.

There's just a lot of potential for things to go wrong--BADLY wrong...

govteach
September 2, 2006, 02:03 PM
I had this happen to me at Christmas 2003. Neighbors are about 1/8th of a mile away, and they got into a "discussion" over a pool game in their house in which one of the friend's kids got in the way of a shot. The "discussion" wound up being turning into a murder in their front yard.....Call the sheriff and protect your family.

BouncerDan
September 3, 2006, 12:07 AM
In my personal case my two closest Neighbors are my grandmother and my cousin. If I heard gunshots from one of there houses I would arm my immedate family while calling the residence that the shot came from. If I didn't receive an answer I would than go investigate to ensire the saftey of my family.

However this is not the case for most people. In most cases I would say protect your family and allow the neighbors to do the same. I mean what if you want to go and help but the neighbor doesn't know you are coming. There is a real possibility you will be shot due to the neighbor being on edge and expecting other BGs. So at this point you must ask yourself if they are good enough friends of yours that you would risk being shot or even killed.

rangermonroe
September 3, 2006, 12:15 AM
I'm willing to die for my family but I ain't willing to die for my neighbor.

I am.

JohnKSa
September 3, 2006, 12:18 AM
I am.That's good, cause if you carry a gun into the middle of an armed confrontation in someone else's home, the odds are reasonably good that you will. The sad thing is that there's a good chance it won't be the bad guy who shoots you.

rangermonroe
September 3, 2006, 12:32 AM
I never even remotely suggested that I would go charging into my neighbors house armed. That would be criminal at best, suicidal at worst.

I simply stated that I would be willing to potentially die to save the lives of my neighbors. I am a flippin' firman. :rolleyes:

In the original posters scenerio, he suggested that he would arm himself and assess the situation.

Following posters have added the run and gun, tactical entry scene.

Arizona Fusilier
September 3, 2006, 09:33 PM
Whoa, slick, yet observant move on your part, Rangermonroe! Yes, the original post did say "assess the situation", thanks for putting me back on track, at least.

In the Army, we had a great saying; "depends on the terrain and situation". I'll invoke that here, now. I would probably arm myself and stand on the sidewalk with a cell phone, but would not likely do anything more than that in my current neighborhood, with my current knowledge of my current neighbors.

Tragically, I don't think I know any of them that well to pursue anything remotely more aggressive. My area has very simple floor plans, basic variants of the classic ranch style, so that's not the problem. All the occupants and their "lifestyle" choices defintely is a problem

Now move me into the country, with few, yet more intimate neighbors, knowing that help is more than 4 minutes or so away like it is here in Phoenix, and I think you'd have a completely different ball game.

In principal, I would give my life for neighbors; hell, I spent 8 years in uniform ready to give my life for the lot of you 280 million doofuses, calling them "neighbors" now doesn't change that basic principal of selflessness, and I won't aplogize for that one iota.

Getting involved and doing right is far more problematic, however, and I won't apologize for that ugly fact, either.