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AC556
July 24, 2006, 11:27 PM
I am having a problem with a Ruger Mark III (678) target pistol. I received it new in the box as a birthday present (woot!) this week so I wanted to clean it before I went to the range. Two hours later I finally got it disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled. I can't believe a rubber mallett is required to do this!

After assembling the pistol while carefully following the directions, the hammer will not stay cocked. The bolt retracts and locks properly. However, when it travels forward it sounds like the hammer immediately falls. I've taken it apart and put it back together several times with the same result. I'm pretty sure that I've properly placed the hammer strut but who knows. I haven't even fired it yet!!!

Any advice would be helpful.

Thanks,
Jim
AC556@aol.com

cntryboy1289
July 25, 2006, 11:59 AM
What required the use of a rubber mallet? I think maybe you bent the hammer strut on your hammer when you removed the mainspring housing, but you might just not be making sure that it fall rearward when you close the mainspring housing.

Here is how it should be taken apart.:

Cock the gun and pull the trigger which will allow the hammer to fall forward. Lift the mainspring housing lock and bring it up and then remove it from the gun by pulling downward on it. Now the receiver can be pulled forward, but you could use a rubber mallet the first time that you try this because at times they are very tight and require either bumping it forward by a mallet or bumping it downward onto a padded bench on the back end.

Now, pull the bolt out of the back and you should have the receiver and barrel, the bolt, and the lower grip frame. I use a spray cleaner from here to remove anything that the factory put on it for rust protection. I then will apply a drop of oil to the hammer where the pins go through and wipe my finger over the bolt as well.

Now place the bolt back into the receiver. Place the receiver back onto the gun and slide it rearward to make the lug in the receiver slide back under the lcoking part on the barrel. It should just slide right back in place for you and it shouldn't be as hard the next time to remove the receiver either. Now, look into the gun at the rear and lean the gun downward, you may have to reach in with something to push the hammer forward out of the way. Next, put the mainspring housing back into the gun with the lock still out. Tip the gun backwards to you with the barrel up in the air and allow the hammer strut to come back to you and then lower the locking mechanism and close the housing. Pull the bolt back and the fire the gun to check to see that you have it right.

If it still won't work right, take a look at the hammer strut and see if it is bent. If it is, you need to contact Ruger and get a new one and then follwo the directions. Hope this helps you out. If you cannot get it figured out, box it up and send back to Ruger, they should take care of it for you and most likely won't charge you anything for it this time.

spacemanspiff
July 25, 2006, 12:12 PM
Man, I'm getting horrible flashbacks of trying to put back together my long-since-sold Mk II. I think I only correctly reassembled it on the first attempt one time. All the other times took several, sometimes a dozen, attempts.

James K
July 25, 2006, 08:30 PM
We have a serious littering problem here. I am referring, of course, to all the Ruger instruction manuals people insist on throwing away without reading.

The basic Standard Model and its successors are quite simple to take down and re-assemble, although they can be rough the first couple of times.

Jim

Billy 45
July 25, 2006, 08:48 PM
Here is a site I found with step by step photos:

http://www.1bad69.com/ruger/field_strip.htm

CrustyFN
July 25, 2006, 09:24 PM
AC556,
Just one more thing. With the Mark III before you can fold the mainspring back in you have to install an empty magazine. That is one step that Ruger left out of the directions. I had a lot of trouble my first time also. Trust me, it gets a lot easier. Calm down, take your time and follow the directions step by step. I used the directions the first three times. Now I can strip the gun in about 15 secomds and reassemble in about 30 seconds. If you need more help PM me.
Rusty

James K
July 25, 2006, 10:08 PM
Both the on-line manual (downloadable in pdf) and the one I have do have the information on inserting an empty magazine. Actually, as CrustyFN found out, dis- and re-assembly of those pistols is actually a lot easier to do than to describe.

One small tip. The best tool I have found for releasing the mainsping housing latch is an empty .223 case. Simple and doesn't scratch.

Jim

cntryboy1289
July 26, 2006, 12:59 AM
I use a penny myself for the sme reasons Jim. I wasn't aware that you had to put the magazine in for assembly for the new pistol though. Why is that if you know?

rezmedic54
July 26, 2006, 08:39 AM
What happened is that the hammer fell forward .I'll bet you can't get it part either. Friend of mine had same problem we sent the gun back ti Ruger the first time the next time he did it I fixed it you have to drive all the pins out . The gun will then come apart. Then you put it back together. The problew is in makeing sure the hammer is cocked there is nothing to hold it in that position so you have to hold the gun with the barrel pointing up so the hammer stays put. We both have disided that we hate the gun LOL. Be Safe Out There Kurt

AC556
July 26, 2006, 09:25 AM
Thanks for all of the suggestions. I am now fairly proficient in disassembling and reassembling the Mark III. The receiver is still so tight on the grip frame that I have to strike it with a rubber mallet multiple times to get it on and off. When assembled, the bolt appears to be functioning correctly. However, I still have my problem with the gun not cocking properly. The hammer does not lock at all.

I used the link that Billy 45 provided and found a useful tip. It suggested that you should insert the mainspring housing in the grip assembly without the receiver attached so that you can see what is going on. I did this and after closing the spring, I was able to see that the hammer strut is seating properly and the spring is providing tension to the hammer. However, the hammer disconnect is not engaging at all when I push back the hammer with my finger. Of course, I am making the assumption that it should.

I'm concerned that maybe something slipped or was bent in the trigger/hammer assembly in my initial attempts to disassemble and reassemble the pistol... grrrr. Nothing looks unusual, but I have no idea what I am looking at.

I've owned a number of firearms including a Ruger AC556 and I've never had this kind of problem.

Any additional suggestions that you have would be helpful.

Thanks Again!
Jim

mete
July 26, 2006, 12:32 PM
I did work on an earlier Ruger ,brand new , which the owner couldn't take apart to clean .He was unsure if he was doing it correctly. I had to use a large hammer with numerous full swings to get the receiver and barrel apart !![fortunately the owner wasn't present ] They must have had a gorilla on the production line .I had to do some file work to get it to reasonably come apart. :eek:

Scorch
July 26, 2006, 01:32 PM
Mete-
After the gun has been disassembled and reassembled several dozen times, it gets looser. Files should be applied with caution.

My opinion is that the sear spring is installed wrong, but without the gun in hand I would not swear to it. If the sear spring gets ahead of the sear, the sear will not engage the hammer. If the hammer is cocking but not staying cocked and follows the bolt, I almost always think it's the sear.

mete
July 26, 2006, 03:42 PM
In my case a file was absolutely necessary and I only told the owner that it was 'difficult' to take apart !!!

M1911
July 26, 2006, 03:48 PM
Why take it apart?

.22s just don't need to be cleaned that often.

cntryboy1289
July 26, 2006, 04:33 PM
I bet he didn't get it back correctly and the sear spring is in front of the hammer instead of behind the sear forcing it up against the hammer like it should be. I bet you made a good call there Scorch.

cntryboy1289
July 26, 2006, 04:35 PM
M1911, I always take them apart and clean off the stuff the the factory puts on everything to prevent rust. They put on some stuff that will cause problems at times.

El Paso Joe
July 27, 2006, 12:57 PM
I would suggest that you check out the video from AGI on the Ruger pistol. Also you might get a copy of "The Gun Digest Book of Firearms Assembly / Disassembly - Part 1: Automatic Pistols" before doing anything else.

There is a story going around about three men of the cloth walking through the woods discussing their disparate theologies. They come to a river and the first declares, while adjusting his roman collar "I shall cross the river." And he walks across the water to the other side. The second, as he adjusted his yamaca, declared "I too shall cross the river." And he too walked across the river to the other side. Not to be outdone, the third declared "If they can do then if I have faith, so can I." He steps off the bank and sinks up to his neck. He swims and as he emerges on the other side, coughing and sputtering, the Rabbi leans over to his dry companion and says, "Father, do you think we should tell him where the rocks are in the river..."

The point is that it is easy to walk on water if you know where the rocks are. And one of the reasons we direct folks to gunsmiths is that they know where a lot of rocks are. But failing that, for easy jobs, AGI videos and a lot of reading material will help...

Regards,
Joe

flashman70
July 28, 2006, 10:46 AM
My Mark III 22/45 was a pain to reassemble. Had the same problem you're describing after I did get it back together. My issue was having the hammer in the correct (cocked, I believe) position before closing her up.

cntryboy1289
July 28, 2006, 12:50 PM
It cannot be cocked before closing the mainspring housing lock. The hammer has to be in the fired position for you to close it.

Harry Bonar
July 31, 2006, 12:46 PM
Dear Shooter:
Be glad that it is necessary to use the mallet to get the reciever/bbl, off.
Harry B.

James K
July 31, 2006, 09:12 PM
AC556,

Do you have spring tension on the disconnector (trigger bar)? Its spring is also the trigger spring. If things are OK there, check the sear spring for correct installation.

I do NOT recommend disassembly of that gun for routine cleaning beyond removing the bolt. I remove crud from the receiver by hosing it down with Gunk Out or something similar then a dose of G96 Gun Treatment. The idea that one must tear down a gun into its tiniest parts and clean each part to surgical standards is ridiculous. (Yes, Marines, I know about the old Gunny, but he isn't with you now and there will be no inspection in the morning!)

Jim

clayking
July 31, 2006, 09:48 PM
Try this site. Very good instructions with pic that you can blow up. I think the first time I cleaned mine took 50 blows with a rubber mallet to get it apart. I'm down to 3-4 now. It is a shooter however.....................ck

http://www.guntalk-online.com/fsprocedures.htm

Doubletaptap
August 4, 2006, 11:25 PM
Sell it and get a Colt.
I ain't heard of a good ruger yet.

maas
August 9, 2006, 08:51 AM
I'm a colt guy but wouldn't buy a new one over a ruger. there not so hard to take apart once you get used to it. it took me around three times before i got good at it and now i bet i could do it blindfolded.

gopack
August 28, 2006, 06:02 AM
If the hammer worked properly before the field strip, then it sounds like the hammer strut was not properly installed or the hammer was in the wrong position during assembly (I believe I did this once). I would field strip it again and follow the steps in the guntalk-online link above. Pay attention to the correct hammer position and hammer strut placement. Rugers are a pain to reassemble properly the first few times. And, yes, I need a rubber mallet to remove the barrel and then to allign the bolt stop hole on the barrel and receiver on reassembly.

I clean mine each time it is fired. I don't like the gunk build up from firing a few hundred rounds and absolutely do not want to go to the range and futz around with the gun because I've not cleaned it.

cmm6259
August 21, 2007, 01:13 AM
I recently purchased a replacement 'target' sear for my 22/45 mark III hunter after reading online reviews describing this as as 'drop in' and installation as 'no problem'. Yeah right. :( While there is a very good mark III disassembly/assembly guide available here:

http://www.wiztechs.com/knightsrealm/guns/22-45/hammerassembly/hammer_assembly.htm

it forgets to mention how to reassemble the stupid magazine disconnect. Grrrr... After about six hour of poking and prodding, searching online, repeat ad nauseum, and probably ruining the micro-finish on my new sear, I finally figured out how to reassemble the magazine disconnect.

The magazine disconnect has a forward facing 'beak' and a rearward facing 'hook'. The trick is how to get everything in its proper place.

Take a good look at the blowout diagram in the Ruger manual. Assemble everything as described in the link provided. The spring goes just to the right (starboard) side of the hammer. The mag disconnect goes next on the pin before it goes through the disconnecter. The beak of this part goes forward.

Assemble the parts, drop into the frame, and insert the pin. The long tail end of the disconnecter spring will be in the magazine well. the front hook-looking part of the spring end up between the sear and the hammer (obviously, this won't work... ) Through the slot in the back of the grip where the mainspring housing goes, you can see a slot in the radial center of the grip. Use a probe to push the tail end of the disconnecter spring through this slot so that it snaps into place in the body of the gun. This may take some fumbling. Then... from the top of the gun, grab the little 'hook' on the front part of the disconnecter spring with a strong pair or tweezers and pull it up and over the front 'beak' part of the disconnecter. There is a small recess here where the spring is supposed to fit.

If anyone can provide more details, or hopefully a more civilized way of doing this, please enlighten us all.

somechick1980
August 21, 2007, 01:37 AM
cmm, i looked at the site you listed and the diagrams alone turned me off from it. find the pdf file which ruger has. the instructions are detailed and the diagrams (i'm more of a visual person) helped me a lot with the mark ii. from what i understand the mark ii is similar to the mark i & iii.

as a side note... a few people have said that 22s do not need cleaning... that may be the case with some 22s but the mark ii that i use does not like to be dirty. before i gave it a good cleaning and oiled it (it's my brother's gun & he has the whole no cleaning philosophy), it misfired frequently. haven't had a problem with it since i've kept up with the cleaning. oh & don't over oil it either (learned that from personal experience :) )

El Barto
August 21, 2007, 11:58 AM
Due to the massive recoil on my new 22/45 I had the sear pivot pin back out, and the manual had no clear instructions on how to strip down and reassemble to that fine of detail. Using the schematics in the manual and trial and error, I was able to reassemble the thing.

My problem was the correct position of the sear spring in relation to the sear. It would not have been a problem if I was able to see the correct position when I tore it down, but because the pin backed out, I could not.

If you follow the instructions in the manual, EXACTLY, you should have no problem.

mflf2
December 22, 2008, 11:30 PM
I fully agree with CrustyFM and thank him for solving my problem. I spent most of the afternoon trying to reassemble my Ruger Mark II 22/45. I was stuck in step 7 of the reassembly instruction. After pointing the muzzle upward in preparation to closing the housing latch, insert an empty magazine then snap shut the latch. I agree Ruger forgot to include this important step.

ME262
March 10, 2009, 06:42 AM
"Cock the gun and pull the trigger which will allow the hammer to fall forward. Lift the mainspring housing lock and bring it up and then remove it from the gun by pulling downward on it. Now the receiver can be pulled forward, but you could use a rubber mallet the first time that you try this because at times they are very tight and require either bumping it forward by a mallet or bumping it downward onto a padded bench on the back end."


I spent all night watching Youtube and the Ruger demos of this. I couldn't remove the housing lock. It woouldn't budge. It just popped right out for the guys in the videos. Finally, after a lot of banging with a hammer and dowel on the top of the gun, I got it out. Now I can't remove the bolt. I point gun up and pull the trigger, but no, the bolt doesn't slide right out like it does in the Ruger video. It won't budge.

Scorch
March 10, 2009, 12:09 PM
I point gun up and pull the trigger, but no, the bolt doesn't slide right out like it does in the Ruger video. It won't budge.THe hammer strut is probably hung up behind one of the cross pins. Look inside where the mainspring housing came out and see it the strut is hanging up.

HisSoldier
March 10, 2009, 06:33 PM
The target model is much tighter than standard Ruger pistols I assume, because mine needed whacking to get the barrel on and off the receiver. Getting the bolt lock that comes up behind the sight was such a pain that I finally made a hardened tapered pin that finished up at .002 under the pins size. I was whacking the danged receiver one way, then the other until it finally lined up! The brass screwdriver thing is to pop the mainspring lift prong up. I should have made the screwdriver edge line up with the taper pin, but it works this way. Now I just get the receiver close and push this in and it's lined up.http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc225/partsproduction/rugert3.jpg
http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc225/partsproduction/rugert5.jpg

The plastic hammer was $5.99 at Harbor Freight, the copper part is a mig tip I use to knock the bolt lock out of the hole from above.

orionengnr
March 10, 2009, 08:04 PM
Wow, a new record.

Not one, but two different bumps as first posts by two different new members, each time resussitating a thread that had been long since dead and buried.

I see this so often it's almost funny. Almost. :rolleyes:

The OP may be dead and buried by now. He hasn't posted since '06. The first bumper...it was his only post, never came back. We'll see how today's new bumper works out.

Search exists for a reason.

ME262
March 11, 2009, 11:56 AM
Right, googled up this thread.

Not the target model. Fixed sights.

Anyway, I don't think I'll never try taking it apart again. I finally did get the bolt off by wacking it hard a few times with my wooden mallet, but then the mag totally locked up in the gun. I called Ruger tech support but that was no help. He said that I could return it to them and they might or might not charge me for a repair, but they would keep it 4 to 6 weeks. I then brought it back to the store where I bought it the day before, but the man there couldn't figure out how to get the mag out either. He said to leave it for their gunsmith. I reclaimed it later in the day. The gunsmith put it back together and charged me $35. He said that the gun was extremely tight and it was hard for him to put it together too. He said he had to hammer the lock back in. I asked him how he got the mag out. He said he had some secret method with his special tool. He said that the gun should loosen up a little bit after shooting a few hundred rounds, but it will still be tight.

Scouring the internet I see people who say they shoot thousands of rounds through this gun and just clean it by soaking it in kerosene or just cleaning and lubing the barrel and inside the handle, so that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to try it out today.

Another thing, with the magazines - when I load em up with ten bullets, why is the top bullet so loose? It just about falls out if I turn the mag upside down. Both mags. Is this normal?

Citizen Carrier
March 11, 2009, 12:20 PM
Doesn't sound normal for the magazine to do that. Do you have more than one and do they all do that?

As far as cleaning, I just go to an Auto Zone and get their cheapest spray can of either brake or carb cleaner. Take off the grips, open the action, remove magazine and spray away.

Wear glasses or goggles to prevent it splashing in your eyes.

You'll notice a remarkable similarity in the way brake and carb cleaner smells to that of a $6 can of Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber".

An earlier post asked how to reassemble the magazine safety disconnect after putting in the target sear.

Answer: Don't.

Install an old Mk II hammer or VQ Mk II target hammer and one of Clark Customs oversized hammer bushings instead. Discard the Mk III magazine safety disconnect junk.

Now you've got a Mk II with a push button magazine release and loaded chamber indicator.

HisSoldier
March 11, 2009, 12:48 PM
Now you've got a Mk II with a push button magazine release and loaded chamber indicator

A lot of folks say the loaded chamber indicator is a bad thing, I don't understand the reason. Can anyone tell me? I can say that it has kept me from dropping the hammer on an empty chamber a number of times. They say it doesn't hurt any modern .22's to dry fire once in a while but I don't like to do it.

ME262
March 11, 2009, 01:16 PM
Thanks, CC. What about the residue from the carb/brake cleaner (or kerosene in the other method) in the innards of the gun? Is that OK? Do you just wipe off what you can get at and let the rest dry out? Do you lube the gun after the carb/brake spray treatment? How about WD-40 instead of carb/brake cleaner, or is that an inadequate solvent? Do the gun parts inside the handle actually get dirty?

HisSoldier
March 11, 2009, 02:38 PM
Carb and brake cleaner both evaporate very fast and leave little to no residue.

hogdogs
March 11, 2009, 03:01 PM
The LCI is a bad thing IMHO as it takes one of the normal steps from the shooter and places it on a mechanical device. Devices fail all too often. The old LCI was metal and if impacted could set off the round. It protrudes when activated and could snag as well as let in dirt when protruded. I don't need the stupid Politically Correct LAWYER gizmo on my pistol as I consider the chamber hot every second until I remove the magazine and open the bolt and look for my self. Before closing bolt I verify no round is laying the action that could chamber when I close it. The magazine interlock safety forces you to insert a magazine to begin cleaning the gun and after reassembly to verify proper operation. Again, IMHO, I prefer to dryfire with no magazine... something about the "bullet holder thingy being inserted into an "empty" gun:o
Brent

hogdogs
March 11, 2009, 03:04 PM
ME262, everything inside the pistol will get dirty.
I suggest you go to gun talk for your MK needs as there is a wealthbed of info on the pistols and great pictorials on stripping and mods as well as many of the quirks and typical wear related problems covered...
http://www.guntalk-online.com/forum/
Brent

ME262
March 11, 2009, 10:02 PM
Thanks, guys. I shot the gun today. Works good, except one of the mags is indeed defective. I'm going to sell it as soon as Ruger sends me a replacement mag. I like guns that I can take apart and put back together all by myself (which is every gun I've ever had in my life up until this one). I'll sell it for $200, a $100+ loss. It's only two days old. Anyone interested? I'm in southern AZ.

hogdogs
March 11, 2009, 11:13 PM
If I had the 2 bills I would jump on it!
I tear mine down and reassemble easily...
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b81/caughthog/P1010963.jpg
I also installed a home mag safety disconnect washer and disabled the LCI.
Brent

HisSoldier
March 11, 2009, 11:39 PM
I took my mag disconnect out too. Didn't notice any trigger improvement but there was great satisfaction in removing another mag disconnect.

I understand your view about the loaded chamber indicator Hogdogs, especially if they ever set off a round. I learned long ago to trust mechanical things myself, no machinist could work if he couldn't, but I respect your viewpoint.

hogdogs
March 11, 2009, 11:49 PM
HS, The guy on gun talk "bullseye" was involved in convincing ruger the metal LCI coud set off a round they are plastic now. Mine is plastic but safety is 'tween my ears. If I had a CQC pistol the mag disconnect may be good as you can drop the mag out if the BG is about to get it from you.

Brent

Zhillsauditor
March 12, 2009, 04:45 AM
"I like guns that I can take apart and put back together all by myself (which is every gun I've ever had in my life up until this one). I'll sell it for $200, a $100+ loss. It's only two days old. Anyone interested? I'm in southern AZ."

A ruger MkIII 22/45 was my first pistol. About the only good thing I can say about it is that after I sold it, my experience with it convinced me to buy a S&W m41. Best gun purchase to date.

ME262
March 13, 2009, 11:56 AM
If I had the 2 bills I would jump on it!
I tear mine down and reassemble easily...

______________________


Oh my, look at all those little pieces! I bet you don't have to bang the pin on yours in and out with a hammer. But I suppose I could send the whole gun back to Ruger and ask them to loosen it up so the lock pops in and out easily as it does in the videos. I've have a couple of potential buyers already, but now I'm having second thoughts...

Citizen Carrier
March 13, 2009, 02:01 PM
You should be having second thoughts! You can't buy a new Ruger .22 pistol for $200.

I swear, unless you are installing an aftermarket part like a VQ sear or trigger, there really isn't any reason to ever disassemble one of these guns anyway.

And there is certainly nothing wrong with a gun with tightly fitting tolerances. That is a bonus, not a detriment.

Really, to clean this gun all you need is a screwdriver, a rod section with a patch eyelet or jag, possibly a bore brush, and a can of $1.59 brake cleaner from Auto Zone.

That's it.

Take the grip panels off with the screwdriver. Lock the bolt to the rear.

Put the little plastic spray tube on the nozzle of the brake cleaner.

Spray out the insides of the gun and let the crud run out through the magazine well. The inside of the gun will look as clean as the day you bought it and the cleaner evaporates quickly.

Run some patches through the bore.

Give the internals a shot of WD40 or similar lubricant. Put the grips back on and you're done.

Takes about 5 minutes.

ME262
March 13, 2009, 08:52 PM
I did it! I became obsessed with this infernal machine and I took it apart again - and much to my amazement! - I put it back together - and it actually seems to still work! What's more, with all my wooden mallet bashing I think it may now come apart and go back together normally like the guns in the videos! So I'll keep it after all.

But here's the next big problem: If I don't do this every week or two I'll forget how to do it.

CC - I believe you said you've shot thousands of rounds using your cleaning method, but I'm just used to opening up guns to inspect and clean them. I have never encountered one like this before, and I hope I never do again.

Citizen Carrier
March 14, 2009, 05:50 AM
I'd use a rubber mallet to seperate the barrel/action, from the lower receiver.

No concern over marring the finish of the gun that way.

Bought mine at Walmart. If I remember correctly, they had rubber mallets in the tool section for $5. But if you go to the sporting goods section, you can find the same mallet with a hook built into the handle for $3, only they call it a "tent stake mallet".

Seems like every few weeks somebody shows up around here complaining about the assembly/disassembly of the Ruger pistols.

And there always seems to be a couple of people who state they simply cannot not disassemble the pistol for cleaning, regardless of how unnecessary it is in light of a $1.59 can of brake cleaner.

I challenge anybody to get a Ruger cleaner in less time using disassembly and the traditional solvent, rags, toothbrush, etc. cleaning routine. You can't do it.

And the more you disassemble and reassemble the gun, the more you accelerate looseness and wear. I wouldn't think it is necessary to take the gun apart more than once a year.

ME262
March 14, 2009, 09:54 AM
Thanks, CC.

Yeah, I'll buy a rubber mallet. This all didn't do my good old homemade wooden mallet any good.

Is brake/carb cleaner then the same substance as gun cleaner? Would you use it to routinely clean guns?

I wonder what the consensus is amongst experienced users of this gun between CC's and Hogdog's cleaning method. Ruger instructions say the latter, take it apart.

Here's your earlier post, CC:

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=3205618

And here's upgrade parts for the gun:

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=3205618


I took the dismantling of this thing as a personal challenge.







Doesn't sound normal for the magazine to do that. Do you have more than one and do they all do that?

As far as cleaning, I just go to an Auto Zone and get their cheapest spray can of either brake or carb cleaner. Take off the grips, open the action, remove magazine and spray away.

Wear glasses or goggles to prevent it splashing in your eyes.

You'll notice a remarkable similarity in the way brake and carb cleaner smells to that of a $6 can of Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber".

An earlier post asked how to reassemble the magazine safety disconnect after putting in the target sear.

Answer: Don't.

Install an old Mk II hammer or VQ Mk II target hammer and one of Clark Customs oversized hammer bushings instead. Discard the Mk III magazine safety disconnect junk.

Now you've got a Mk II with a push button magazine release and loaded chamber indicator.

Citizen Carrier
March 14, 2009, 02:16 PM
I use brake or carb cleaner to routinely clean guns.

And those chemicals smell remarkably similar to something like Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber" or other similar spray cleaners you find at gun shops.

I suspect they are near chemically identical. They are not identical in price though.

Just make sure you remove any plastic or wood grips or the stock if it is a rifle you are cleaning. Most "gun cleaners" stipulate doing that as well.

That's one thing I like about the Rugers. Aside from the grips, everything else on the gun is metal. No plastics.

Until I switched to the Pardini match pistol, I used a Ruger Mk II "slabsides" extensively in weekly rimfire bullseye matches. This was the method I used to clean them and I never had a "dirt related" misfire or jam.

I believe I first encountered the "brake cleaner" suggestion years ago when reading an article in "Gun Tests" about the Ruger guns. That was how the staff of that magazine cleaned their Rugers.

In my experience, and this is with both Mk II and III pistols, the only recurring problem was what I call "The Ruger Stovepipe". What would happen is that an extracted case would impact the left lip of the magazine before it hit the ejector. This would cause the spent case to tumble in the action and lodge. The case would be sticking open end out with the rimmed base still in the action with the bolt closing on it.

I had this happen on both my II and III pistols and I witnessed it in my friend's Mk II as well.

It was an easy fix. I just put the magazines in a vice and carefully removed small amounts of metal from the left magazine lip. Then I chambered a round, and watched as I slowly pulled the bolt back to extract it. When I could see enough metal had been removed to insure the case would always hit the ejector and never the magazine, the pistol worked 100% save the occasional dud round commonly encountered with .22 rimfire ammunition.

hogdogs
March 14, 2009, 03:11 PM
To clear it up... My total disassembly was due to me getting rid of mag safety, and once that far in I decided to go ahead and do the total thing to familiarize my self with the gem.
Brent

ME262
March 14, 2009, 04:55 PM
I use brake or carb cleaner to routinely clean guns.

And those chemicals smell remarkably similar to something like Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber" or other similar spray cleaners you find at gun shops.

I suspect they are near chemically identical. They are not identical in price though.

Wouldn't be a bit surprised. I figured that Mobil 1 or something would do the job just as good as special gun oils too, at a tiny fraction of the cost.


In my experience, and this is with both Mk II and III pistols, the only recurring problem was what I call "The Ruger Stovepipe". What would happen is that an extracted case would impact the left lip of the magazine before it hit the ejector. This would cause the spent case to tumble in the action and lodge. The case would be sticking open end out with the rimmed base still in the action with the bolt closing on it.


Ha! That is exactly what was happening with the one mag, the mag I was planning to return to Ruger, but haven't yet. I guess I'll go ahead and return it anyway. Should I order a spare mag from them while I'm at it, or is there a better place to get them?

I've had relatively little experience with .22's, though I have a S & W 617. What's the best way to clean the barrel? The rods they sell for .22's, when you slip a piece of patch on them, it makes for a very tight fit.

Citizen Carrier
March 14, 2009, 10:49 PM
Always a good idea to have extra magazines, but like I said, the Ruger Stovepipe can be corrected easily at the workbench and the gun will function perfectly afterwards.

My prefered method of cleaning .22 pistol barrels is to get a coated cable pull-through such as the ones made for cleaning AR15 rifles.

I push the cable through the barrel, from the muzzle to the breech with the eyelet piece on. Then I put a .22 patch in the eyelet and pull the cable back through the barrel.

You don't have to disassemble the pistol to do it this way and there is no rod section rubbing up against the crown of the muzzle wearing it down.

allenomics
March 14, 2009, 11:36 PM
I wouldn't consider doing it myself. Good basic cleaning without a tear down is really all you need to do with that pistol, IMO.

ME262
March 15, 2009, 09:39 AM
"I wouldn't consider doing it myself. Good basic cleaning..."

What do you mean by good basic cleaning, following the Ruger instructions to take the thing apart, as opposed to what Mr Hogdog did once, or CC's method?

CC, you're the expert!

Masada
March 15, 2009, 09:42 AM
My wife has one of these pistols.

We stop after initial disassembly -- we NEVER get to the rubber mallet stage.

Yes, putting it back together is a bit tricky. There's a video on the Ruger website that explains it. Once you get the hang of it, it's a snap.

m.p.driver
March 15, 2009, 10:19 AM
Always used carb cleaner in the army for cleaning m16's and the m60's.It gets the carbon buildup off,just what it was made to do.

Citizen Carrier
March 15, 2009, 04:32 PM
He probably was referring to modifying the magazine so it doesn't cause stovepipes. That was what he wouldn't do himself, if I understand correctly.

Back when I modified mine, there was a website with photos on how another guy modified his. The thing is that you only remove enough metal from the left lip so that cases hit the ejector and not the lip.

I don't know that I'm an expert, but I've modified at least 4 Rugers that I can remember with upgraded aftermarket parts. After the first one, the rest were easy. I was able to install a VQ sear on the last two with just my fingers and in a matter of minutes.

That's why I don't understand why people complain about the complexity of these pistols and their quirks.

hogdogs
March 15, 2009, 04:57 PM
CC, How many of these mags need trimmed? I have never had a single stovepipe with my 2 mags and my father's MKI was a jewel as well and he never tried a disassembly.
Brent

Citizen Carrier
March 15, 2009, 06:01 PM
That's the thing.

It apparently doesn't happen to everybody. My Mk II would routinely have this stovepipe problem, as did a friend of mine using an identical "slabsides" target model. Depending on the magazine, it would happen once every 30 shots or so. Maybe more often than that even.

As I was using the gun for bullseye competition, those jams were costing me scores and causing delays in the matches because I would have to refire.

So I went ahead and modified all six or so of the magazines I'd accumulated just to be on the safe side.

The website where I learned of this problem also suggested the plastic magazine base could be worn or ground down so the magazine "sat lower" in the pistol against the heel magazine release. This was an alternative to grinding down the left mag lip slightly. My way worked just fine for me.

If you aren't experiencing the Ruger Stovepipe, then it isn't a concern.

ME262
March 16, 2009, 12:43 AM
Ruger stovepipe: It was occurring about every other round with one mag. The other mag seemed to work OK. Possibly the bad mag was the one that got jammed in my gun during my first attempt at disassembly. Maybe the gunsmith damaged it when he removed it, or maybe it jammed because it was damaged in the first place. Anyway, I'll send it back to Ruger and let them replace it under warranty, and maybe I can order an additional mag or two from them while I'm at it and they won't charge me any postage.

ME262
March 16, 2009, 12:47 AM
My wife has one of these pistols.

We stop after initial disassembly -- we NEVER get to the rubber mallet stage.

Yes, putting it back together is a bit tricky. There's a video on the Ruger website that explains it. Once you get the hang of it, it's a snap.


Well, again, by initial disassembly you must mean removing the lock mechanism etc. a la the Ruger instructions, and this operation, when the gun is new and tight, is what requires the rubber/wooden mallet and dowel in order to bang out the pin - and then bang it back in again.

shortwave
March 18, 2009, 01:04 AM
delete D/P. APOLOGIES!!!!

shortwave
March 18, 2009, 01:07 AM
I must be as lucky as Mr. CC. I`ve done far less cleaning my MK1. This gun has literally been abused. Don`t know how many thous. of rds. to date. Myself, kids and now grandkids. To-date gun has never been completely broken down. Barrel swabbed, feeding ramp(area) and mags cleaned. Gun blown out with compressed air and completely oiled with a LIGHT OIL. Have never had a problem in years of service other than with cheap Phillipine, Korean ,middle East ammo. Gun still fired but I stopped due to sandy/gritty feeling in chamber and slide. If your having stovepipe issues a cleaning or replacement of your mags may be in order

papasmurf2413
April 4, 2010, 09:05 PM
This thread was 6 pages long but i'm pretty boned here.. I'm going shooting wednesday and i tried disassembling my Ruger 22/45 MArk III Hunter and I'm STUMPED. I couldnt get the level OUT off the back of the gun.. I got it up... yanked and tugged and nothing happened so i put it back down and tried to cock my bolt back normally and the thing only goes half way back... and now i cant get the lever back... I really need help people thanks so much!

chb1764
September 10, 2010, 01:58 PM
took my mk3 apart using book no big deal putting back together seem to go ok a little stif ( its new ) now nothing works slide very stif trigger not working magazine eject not working worst of all I can not even get it apart again can someone help Chris

desertmatt
June 16, 2012, 09:00 PM
I must thank Scorch for mentioning the sear spring. Until you have taken this gun completely apart, studying how each piece operates like an old Swiss clock maker, you will have trouble identifying problems.

In my case, I bought a Mark III 22/45 despite *hating* the thin grip. I once owned a Mark II 22/45 that I both loved (shooting) and hated (assembling). Apparently later 22/45 models have removable grip panels, but not mine. Anyway, I removed them...with a milling machine. Then I carved some really thick wooden ones (I have big meaty hands), decorated the wood, and gorilla glued them on. Then I happily assembled the finished product, pulled back on the bolt, released the bolt so it should be cocked, pulled the trigger...and no "click". Nuts!

I guess the bowing of the frame from the mill vise (and some reckless abuse I will not admit to) allowed the sear spring to get past the sear. I would have lost all hope if not for the websites others mentioned (and I repeat here):
http://www.guntalk-online.com/2245detailstripping.htm
http://www.guntalk-online.com/detailstrip.htm
Once I dove in, I was impressed by the design. It was easier than I could have imagined! Reset the sear spring and I was in business...click. Really, it took less than a half hour.

My question is, how did anyone ever figure stuff like this out before the internet? They must have been geniuses. Well, I think I must now be over the hump with this gun. Now I will definitely consider making some of the modifications the kids are doing to the Mark III's nowadays.

Thanks again!