PDA

View Full Version : This is the reason why I always shoot in the farthest left lane whenever I can


Lionken07
June 23, 2006, 08:50 AM
So I was at the range with a buddy. The guy to our right keep saying sorry to the dude on his right. So I look to see why and it so happens that his casing keep on hitting the dudes head. It seems that he have no way to go since all the other lanes are taken. :barf:

this ever happen to you?

silicon wolverine
June 23, 2006, 11:12 AM
I once tagged my brother in law with a case from my mini 14 on the side of his head. Cut him open about 2" long. bled like a stuck pig.

SW

hksigwalther
June 23, 2006, 11:45 AM
IMO, it is a part of shooting (in some places). Accept it if you are in the receiving end or move to a different stall. No reason to get angry about it. The shooter on your right is kind enough to apologize (as I would) to the shooter to his right but isn't really necessary. I also try to find a shooting position or object (like my toolbox when I'm shooting off of a bench) to prevent it from happening to the shooter on my right but accept that it will happen and that some folks aren't as courteous.

El Barto
June 23, 2006, 11:55 AM
I haven't been hit by another person's ammo, but I almost hit myself in the eye with flying brass from my K31. I say almost because I was wearing protective glasses and I will continue to do so.

First time I took my ex to a range I explained to her that there is the possibility of hot flying brass and if she gets hit, the best thing to do is to be calm and I would help her. I said whatever you do, don't jump around waving the gun.

Well about thirty minutes into her first run, I watch a hot .22 case bounce off the partition and under her collar. She calmly kept the gun pointed downrange and was in the process of puttin it down when I plucked the brass off her neck. It all happened in a couple of seconds but she has a nasty blister afterwards.

orionengnr
June 23, 2006, 07:44 PM
to deflect a lot of incoming brass. Having your shirt buttoned helps too. I usually pick the far right lane so my brass doesn't hinder someone else; my shirt, ball cap and eye protection will likely deflect brass from anyone to my left.

leadcounsel
June 24, 2006, 11:32 AM
Basically, if there is a partition between lanes, the person on the left needs only to step forward abit so the shells strike the partition. If you're in the field, just step over or back a foot or two.

JoshB
June 24, 2006, 12:34 PM
It's happened to me plenty of times. I'm not really concerned about brass hitting me - after all it's pretty harmless. I used to think that wearing safety glasses were a bit much [we generally don't use them at ranges in the Marines], untill one time at a civilian range a casing bounced off my glasses. I was also present one time when the RO cought one in the eye. Fortunatly, he turned out alright.

Rangefinder
June 24, 2006, 03:21 PM
Loose collared shirts that are tucked in aren't my best friend at times. Had a friend send several hot brass right at me from a burst. Couldn't have done it better if he'd planned it--two hit me in the neck and went right down the front. I think I would have danced around less if it was a mad bumble bee instead. :D

Slinging brass just goes along with everything else. *shrug* Oh well. Sometimes you're giving, sometimes you're recieving.

Dust_Devil
June 24, 2006, 06:45 PM
Beware... Anyone on my right when I'm shooting my Mini-14!! :D
That rifle really kicks out the brass.

There is one range I go to that provides portable "walls" made up of PVC tube and screen netting that you can put up next to you on your bench or table to stop your flying casings.


Brass catchers are also a pretty good idea if you can find one made for your rifle.

Overall, if you know that your gun really throws out the hot brass, it would only be considerate of you as the shooter who is going to be shooting along with others on the range who could be on your right to have something prepared to set up such as a brass catcher so not to disturb your neighbor shooting on your right.

pdkflyguy
June 25, 2006, 12:41 AM
My Walther P22 has a tendency to kick brass to about the 5 o'clock position. I didn't know this until I was showing my wife how to shoot it, and standing behind her to the right. Needless to say, I always stand to the left now.

dfaugh
June 25, 2006, 08:03 AM
Actually, I usually try to stay to the right. I'd rather get hit (which has happened) than to hit someone else. At the range I usually shoot its not much of a problem as benches (on the rifle range) are fairly far apart, and its rarely crowded enough that you have to get real close. The one gun I have that's downright dangerous to others is my SKS-M, which will fling brass anywhere in an arc between 1 and 5 o'clock, and between 10 and 20 feet! So I never fire it if there's anyone on my right.

snolden
June 26, 2006, 10:15 PM
I try to tweak my FAL so it drops the brass within a foot or so. Once it gets dirty and I have to turn the gas up, it can shoot 20 feet, but it usually behaves for 200 rounds or so.

My pistols? Who cares, it aint that hot nor is it that heavy.

ffxmike
June 26, 2006, 11:55 PM
I had a guy at an outdoor range yell at me one time. had been shooting a bolt action 22 rifle, and switched to my G17. naturally, the brass goes farther, and was landing around him (didn't hit him)

Him & his buddy yell at me to move, because I shouldn't shoot a pistol there, it could send brass near them. told them "no problem" and cased up my g17.

Pulled out my beretta storm, and continued to do the same thing.

No partitions, I've been hit by other peoples brass, I accept it as a risk you take shooting at that particular range. Had they asked nicely instead of yelling at me I probably would have just gone back to the .22.

yes, I know this will make a lot of people on this board think I'm a jerk for what I did and I'm okay with that.

Syntax360
June 30, 2006, 09:20 AM
I also think it is something that all shooters need to accept. I hate when someone gets rude about it as if they didn't expect flying brass to be an issue when they came to the range on a busy Saturday.

I went with my buddy once to the local indoor range and it was just the two of us. Another shooter came in and was on the lane next to us. I guess he was a little upset by all my friend's brass, so he moved 5 lanes over - problem solved, right? Then my buddy gets to shooting his FiveseveN and the guy 5 lanes over starts yelling because the 5.7 brass keeps flying down to his lane, ricocheting off the stall wall and pegging him in the head. I could hardly contain my laughter. My buddy apologized, but the guy was really mad and packed up his stuff and left. Cry baby.

CrazyLarry
July 3, 2006, 05:09 PM
When about 17 a M1A thumped me pretty good with empty casings
lol I like that rifle so much though it was like a kiss

Lutefisk
July 5, 2006, 01:40 PM
In addition to the flying brass, I've noticed that an inexperienced right- handed shooter will more often accidentally cover a person to his right while clearing jams, talking to his buddies, putting down a cigarette etc. I recently warned a fellow club member and the rangemaster about a young fellow who was shooting with his right and checking his target with binoculars(!) with his left while still holding his pistol. Might I add he was at 15 yards!!

mtnbkr
July 5, 2006, 02:31 PM
A couple years ago, I was shooting at a crowded national forest range with my brother. The gun was throwing brass on a couple to our right, who complained to us about it. Since there were no other open lanes, I offered to switch positions with them so they wouldn't get hit. They refused and continued to complain until they left a half hour later. :rolleyes:

Chris

stephen426
July 5, 2006, 02:41 PM
I took my best friend and his wife shooting one time. She was wearing a tank top that showed a little cleavage. One casing bounced off the partition and landed right in her cleavage. She turned around (with gun in hand) and covered half the people in the range with the muzzle. I grabbed her hands and pointed the gun upwards while she fished out the hot shell casing. (Lucky there were no accidental discharges) Needless to say, I don't think she will ever expose any cleavage at the range again. :eek: :D

LSU12ga
July 6, 2006, 06:11 PM
i shoot right handed guns lefthanded.

with my shotgun, if i dont rack hard enough, say i just fired my last shell, and it slowy pops out, i get a hot shotshell on my arm or leg.

And when i am firign fast i get hot shells flying infront of me.

vts
July 7, 2006, 11:09 AM
My wife got a shell down her bra once. Poor thing got a littel burn on both breast.
I had to kiss both spots allll night to make her feel better:rolleyes:

marlboroman84
July 7, 2006, 07:29 PM
The range I frequent the stall are pretty close together and have open-topped partitions. I'm used to catching some brass now,I've still been able to shoot consistently with the guy next to me flinging 9mm casing at me like there was no tomorrow, but Ma always said I was hard headed. I think the funniest thing that ever happened though is me and my buddy were shooting and I get done and step off the lane and he is laughing hysterically. I ask him what's so funny and he says check your pocket. I had a .45 casing go straight in the back of my jeans and land on top of my wallet.:rolleyes:

silicon wolverine
July 8, 2006, 06:27 PM
The absolute worst is a CETME with a new ejector. I put a new one in mine and the brass was flying 60-70 feet. I shoot left handed and the first one i fired clipped the end the my nose and drew blood.

SW

castnblast
July 13, 2006, 06:39 PM
Ever wonder why ranges require eye protection??? You guessed it!!!

Tronny
August 2, 2006, 09:19 AM
the range nearest to me has big walls in between every other bench. Suppose it's for being with a shooting buddy you dont have a wall in between the two. Theres always plenty of spots open to spread out, too.
Have an SKS that launches brass pretty far, it will hit the wall and bounce around the cubby a few times. been tagged by a few on my hands and face. No harm done, it's all part of the experience!

Doubletaptap
August 2, 2006, 10:34 AM
I would suggest folks with guns that toss brass get a brass catcher. I got one for my AR for 9.95 and it works fine.

UniversalFrost
August 2, 2006, 10:39 AM
For those of you who reload or want to sell the brass get a brass catcher or make one.

As far as being hit with brass it is a given if shooting at a range. Heck I even been hit with my own brass while standingin an open stall and it bounced off the post a few feet to the right and behind me, hit me right in the back of the head and rolled down my collar.

Once was shooting my m4a3 with a 100rd beta c mag and the guy in the next lane starts walking toward me to complain about my brass going into his lane and he catches a couple spent shells right in the face from my m4. grabs his face and starts cursing. I turn around to see what the commotion is and this guy is yelling at me about how he is going to ge me kicked out, yadayada yada.

Anyway long story short, i had no idea he was coming towards me and the rangemaster and the manager of the range both agreed that he was at fault for walking up behind me and in my lane and he got what he deserved.

A few hot casings in the face will teach ya not to walk up from behind while a guy is shooting. :rolleyes:

Doubletaptap
August 4, 2006, 02:42 AM
(It's a part of shooting)
To me that sounds like a pretty unsportsmanlike attitude. Other people pay their hard earned money to enjoy a good day shooting,not to be peppered by somebody elses brass.
How can you concentrate and enjoy yourself if you're dodging hot casings?
To some it may be a part of shooting but it really ****** me off if I'm trying to shoot and some guy starts popping me with hot brass.
I know guns do that but I would feel better if people tried to prevent it at least a little.
My remedy for the situation is to ask the guy if he wants to trade places, or I re-locate.
Now that I have a brass catcher,folks shooting next to me are much happier.And I don't feel like I ruined someones day out trying to enjoy their guns.
My next step at our range is to see if the owners will provide portable screens for the benches.
Everybody working toward one goal can make it happen.
George

Doubletaptap
August 4, 2006, 02:50 AM
(It's a part of shooting)
To me that sounds like a pretty unsportsmanlike attitude. Other people pay their hard earned money to enjoy a good day shooting,not to be peppered by somebody elses brass.
How can you concentrate and enjoy yourself if you're dodging hot casings?
To some it may be a part of shooting but it really ****** me off if I'm trying to shoot and some guy starts popping me with hot brass.
I know guns do that but I would feel better if people tried to prevent it at least a little.
My remedy for the situation is to ask the guy if he wants to trade places, or I re-locate.
Now that I have a brass catcher,folks shooting next to me are much happier.And I don't feel like I ruined someones day out trying to enjoy their guns.
My next step at our range is to see if the owners will provide portable screens for the benches.
Everybody working toward one goal can make it happen.

I had one guy I asked to trade because he was spraying me with almost full auto rapid fire casings,I told him he was covering me up with brass trying to be a little humorous and get the point acrross at the same time. He stated basically that it was tough sh** and I'd just have to deal with it.
I put my rifle down after clearing it, stood up and tapped him on the shoulder. I asked him politely if we could trade places or was I going to have to carry him to his vehicle with his rifle stuck up his a**.
There must have been something in my eye because he shut up, packed his stuff and went inside.
Later the rangemaster told me I handled that beautifully. He was about to ask him to leave anyway because he had told him several times at previous visits there was no rapif fire allowed.
But it ruined my day shooting and I left soon after.
I don't like to rain on other peoples parade.
George

Hal
August 22, 2006, 05:47 AM
Flying brass is a part of shooting.
I tend to think if you can't deal with flying brass,,,,,what are you going to do when lead starts flying your way?

LOL! Ask the BG to change places with you???:rolleyes:

Sheesh - cover up, wear side guards on you eye protection and a bill on your hat/cap.

I expect things like flying brass, loud noises, muzzle flashes from a gun....ummm,,it's what they do right?

If I get tagged on open skin by brass - it's my fault for not being prepared.

buzz_knox
August 22, 2006, 08:44 AM
How can you concentrate and enjoy yourself if you're dodging hot casings?

Don't ever take a training course if you can't accept hot brass. You WILL get pelted with brass (I had a lovely series of 5 burns on my face from the case mouth of hot 5.56 brass) and if you let it distract you, not only will you not get anything out of the course, you will probably get thrown out.

I try to adjust my position when I'm at an indoor range so as not to pelt others with my brass or get hit by it. But it really is something that you have to accept if neither they nor you can get into a position to avoid it.

Esquire M Busterbury
August 22, 2006, 12:22 PM
While it is almost annoying it DOES 'come with the territory', and therefore should simply be dealt with. Not to say that you can't sometimes find a way to aleviate the problem (catchers clamped to the table or simply swapping tables) but it's almost like going out to a bar on a friday night and complaining about the smoke...You know in advance you're going to come home smelling like smoke. If it was that big a problem, you could have simply gone to chuck-e-cheeses (and leave the pretty ladies for us firemen-wannabes who are willing to bravely go into a smokey bar and rescue them :D).

And besides, getting hit with a little brass on the range might make you that much LESS distracted oneday when it might matter (god forbid).

Lycanthrope
August 22, 2006, 12:50 PM
Complaining about flying brass at a gun range is like complaining about guns being too loud.....or too big of a caliber.....or too evil looking....

But....any brass that lands on me is mine.

moredes
August 24, 2006, 02:18 AM
When I used to frequent public ranges, I chose the right-most pistol stall. I've found that careless right-handers will sweep folks to their left, especially those with autos who're clearing or loading.

Big Don
January 16, 2007, 02:01 AM
The outdoor range in Lincoln, CA has screens that pull down and roll up, just like window shades. They're positioned between each bench and it's up to the shooters to pull them down to stop incoming brass.
I agree with just about everyone else: you go to the range, you need to expect to be hit by flying brass. Count yourself lucky (or well positioned) if you're not hit. Wear safety glasses, button your collar, wear a hat (coolie hats are great for deflecting brass) and long sleeves if you don't want to get burned. Besides, how cool is it to tell someone that burn on your face/neck/arm is from a hot rifle case! Very manly stuff. :D

Mark B
January 18, 2007, 11:26 PM
:D Everybody has to catch one down the shirt at least once! Just think of it as.. a situational awareness drill.

O6nop
January 25, 2007, 11:54 AM
I'm not familiar with these - I understand the concept, catch brass - but where do you get them, how do they attach to the gun, are they comfortable to shoot with, do they throw off balance at all?

Ultima-Ratio
January 25, 2007, 12:26 PM
When I used to frequent public ranges, I chose the right-most pistol stall. I've found that careless right-handers will sweep folks to their left, especially those with autos who're clearing or loading.
Exactly my experience which includes several leftwards NDs!!:eek:

atblis
January 25, 2007, 03:16 PM
I chose the right-most pistol stall. I've found that careless right-handers...
That's a very good point. I've also found that to be my experience.

Sgt.Fathead
March 6, 2007, 01:01 AM
The only indoor ranges we frequent have pretty good partitions so it's not much of an issue. The other day, however, I was sighting in a 10/22 I just bought my wife at Cabela's PA store and had ejection issues from another shooter. We were at a northwestern NJ Wildlife Management Area range and the fella to my left was firing Lord only knows what slugs from a Remington 11-87 12 gauge. Every time he fired, the spent shot shell casing would come three lanes over and whack me or enter my sight picture. We were the only shooters out there, it was pretty damn cold, and I waited for him to take a break and asked if he would be long, and if so, could we switch? He was very accommodating and we had continued our shoot.

I say, if you can't reach an agreement, well, that's the problem of the other shooter. It just goes with the territory. When I was in the service (cripes, here he goes again) we would often TRY to get hot brass down the back of each other's necks. Thank God the M2 .50 is bottom ejecting!

ConcealCarryNY
March 16, 2007, 11:39 AM
Thank God the M2 .50 is bottom ejecting

I was training a few nugget crewchiefs on a gun run and we had an issue will a hydro leak so I bent down to trouble shoot while they were engaging the right XM218 and I caught a shell down the back of my flightsuit. My god I had some huge burns on my back and legs(had to shake it out). Talk about doing the funky chicken dance.

Dave in AZ
June 14, 2007, 06:21 PM
I agree - wearing a ball cap make a big difference.

I go to the right though at the range. I would rather send my brass into a wall or into an empty area where its easier to police than to worry about getitn ghit by someone to my left. Brass is expensive, skin can grow back.

opg4740
June 14, 2007, 06:30 PM
My CZ-52 tends to launch brass into lower Earth orbit, full on 12'oclock high. I have never seen any other pistol get rid of brass in such a forceful way.

medicstimpy
June 21, 2007, 01:31 AM
Yup... part of life at the range. We all live with it.

My buddy's new 9mm Czech gun (K100???) is the weirdest. When I'm on his right, it has a rotating barrel ejector so his spent cases always bounce off the top of my 1911. Always in the same spot.:eek:

I now have to watch him when he opens up his case so I know to stand back a little bit more if he pulls out the 9. Then I wait and watch them bounce off the table, again, always in the same spot. :p

oldbillthundercheif
June 21, 2007, 03:29 AM
If someone is shooting an automatic rifle just the right distance to the left of you, an entire burst of blazing hot casings can land between your collar and your neck. I know this from experience. Ouch.

koffin
June 29, 2007, 10:21 AM
When I used to frequent public ranges, I chose the right-most pistol stall.

You nailed it..... I will never, ever, EVER stand on the far left.

Langenator
June 30, 2007, 10:36 PM
If you want some fun, get a VZ-52 or -52/57 to take to the range.

Mine throws the brass about 7 feet or so-to around the 10 o'clock position. THAT takes folks by surprise. I try to set up at the far left if I'll be shooting that one.

SDC
July 2, 2007, 08:48 AM
A Swedish AG42 rifle is as bad for this as anything I've ever seen; they'll throw their empties (6.5x55 Mauser) a good 30-35 feet out to 2 o'clock, and I've seen one fired under a covered firing point that left half of its empties STUCK neck-first into one of the 4x4 uprights.

tazmss
July 16, 2007, 01:02 PM
Loose collared shirts that are tucked in aren't my best friend at times. Had a friend send several hot brass right at me from a burst. Couldn't have done it better if he'd planned it--two hit me in the neck and went right down the front. I think I would have danced around less if it was a mad bumble bee instead.



I can agree with that...I did the same, but to add to that, I had on sandals(learning lesson here....), had one down in the front, then, less then 20 minutes later, one landed between the toes.... I looked like I was doing a rain dance.... Out of all of that, I did learn quite a bit about "range manners".....try to be considerate to other shooters, especially in smaller ranges with narrower lanes...

asianthug
July 26, 2007, 10:32 PM
It is siply the worst if you are on the right side of an AK shooter. You will be showered with shells. I am usually the first guy at the range so I will be the first guy on the line. The thing I like most at our range is that I get back to my spot quickest as the walk path is on the left. I hate being in the middle because I always can't tell which spot is mine to line up new target. I love shooting floppy drives and CDs instead of paper targets.

rampage841512
August 18, 2007, 03:18 PM
The range I go to is indoor and has these nice steel panels between the stalls. They come in handy, but the 'ping!' of spent brass hitting them kind of gets annoying. :rolleyes:

SpookBoy
August 18, 2007, 11:07 PM
a few years back when i was into really large handguns I was watching a man shoot a 50ae D-eagle ,Well i got a little too curious & was hit in the eyebrow with a 50 case,wich then proceded to go into my shoe
(shorts & short socks) only wear pants now,still have the brassand a nice nitch in the brow as a lesson/no complaints though.Just part of a day at the range!;)

jwfuhrman
April 4, 2008, 08:12 AM
I remember when I shot for my High Schools Senior Rifle team, we were shooting at a John C. Garand Match at the local Gun Club, we shot in 2 man teams and my teammate was shooting on the line just next to me to the right, well it was the rapid fire Sitting Position, 10 shots, 90secs @ 100yrds I think it is, but I remember I got done with about 30secs left and my partner is freaking out, evidentally all 10 of my cases went down the back of his shooting coat.......30-'06 HOT brass......needless to say thats the fastest Ive ever seen anyone shoot 2rds reload 8rds......and still keep a good 4in group at that speed....

we all got a good laugh

montveil
April 4, 2008, 08:47 AM
When I was in the Army in the early sixties my basic training company was charged with pulling targets for civilian M1 rifle competetion. We used the typical canterlevered sash targets
If we were too busy we could not strip the targets and after 7 + targets were pasted on one another some of the brass jackets would strip off the cores and drop into the pits.
I was on more than one occasion that one of these jackets would land in someones shirt collar. Initially the trainee would think he was shot.

bcavin
April 21, 2008, 06:22 PM
Not to long ago i was coaching the pistol range aboard MCAS New River, and sometime in the afternoon one of my shooters said "hey caoch, how do you keep from flinching when the brass hits you in the face?". I was so used to it that i didn't even realize it was happening! If you're going to be on a range, your going to get tagged with brass, that simple. It's not going to hurt you or bite you, and if you get a little blister from it, i promise it will heal.

Oh yeah, at the end of the day when i took my cover off, 6-7 9mm casings fell off the top and into my lap while i was driving. Scarred me sh-tless.

Deer Hunter48
May 11, 2008, 08:04 AM
I was shooting on my local trap field last tuesday my friend next to me was shooting an semi auto and he was hitting me with his spent shells. Didnt bother me much but they still hurt. I dont think anyone would complain at that range since we all are guilty from time to time.

Rant Casey
May 11, 2008, 12:31 PM
Thats one reason among many that I built my own range on my land, and will NEVER frequent indoor ranges. I had a man shooting next to me a couple years back and one of his shell casings fell into my shooting glasses. It wasn't his fault but I will never go into an indoor range again, I just don't like the idea of shooting next to someone who could have little to no firearms saftey training.

usncporet
May 11, 2008, 06:31 PM
Was shooting my Glock 22, brass falling in the lane to my right over the barrier, and the lady who was with her boyfriend/husband yelled at me to "watch my brass". I politely told her I couldn't and I was sorry. I shot a few more times, boyfriend yells to stop hitting him with brass. Again I told them it couldn't be helped and shot some more. The boyfriend swept up some brass and while I was shooting threw the brass at me. I calmly, don't know how, went out to the range manager and he promptly booted them. I consider brass to be a part of shooting and I actually kind of like the distraction. I am certain that if I were in the trenches and my brothers-in-arms were spitting brass on me, I would be happy I was being pelted with their brass!

hr636
May 21, 2008, 08:35 AM
Go to unmanned ranges.

workinwifdakids
May 30, 2008, 09:42 PM
When my brother and I go shooting, he'll stand at my 4:00 (just behind and to the right of me). Every time I squeeze off a round, he catches the brass in the air and - in one smooth motion - throws it at my head.

I love my brother.
:D

Nnobby45
May 31, 2008, 12:38 AM
Have to admit to finding a certain amount of humor in watching the antics of a gal who just had some hot brass go down her blouse.

However, hot brass getting under an inexperienced shooters clothing, or down inside their glasses (that happened to me), doesn't take much imagination as to would could happen if someone started dancing around with a loaded gun in their hands, finger on trigger---well you get the point.

Ball cap pulled low (and maybe canted left) and shirts buttoned all the way should be a rule on every range.

KnightZero
June 1, 2008, 08:19 AM
At the spot where I shoot, (indoor range) the only way to pass brass into the next lane is to lean a bit too far out on the line, or if your gun ejects very high. I catch most of the brass from whatever I'm shooting on my own arms, after it bounces off the divider wall next to me. It's barely a sting, not enough to even break my stance in most cases. My P22 does get me every once in awhile, either ejecting a casing (or 10) in a perfect arc down the back of my shirt, or spitting casings directly back at my glasses repeatedly.

There was one unpleasant happening - a gentleman with a semiauto was rapid-firing down range, and every single one of his ejected brass casings came over the divider and bounced around in my stall. He saw where his rounds were ejecting, and got a genuine "Oh ****" look on his face. I let him know I wasn't bothered - doesn't take that much to step back from the line for a second to let someone finish a mag. I was firing the range rental .44 magnum, so I just took a well needed breather each time he emptied a mag.