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razorburn
April 21, 2006, 07:52 PM
and it was delicious. Easily the best white meat I've had, actually. I'd love to try out duck hunting, but, I hear it's expensive and very complex to try. Just what does a man need? In particular, I've been thinking of trying jump shooting. Seems fairly simple, sneak up on a pond, shoot the ducks as they try to fly off. But getting the ducks out of water would be the problem. I have a retriever, but she is scared of both guns and water. I have a canoe, but it's 150lbs, and would not be easy trying to portage the thing to duck water. Any hope of getting the basics to try it for $1,000 or so, or just surrender?

tBlake08
April 21, 2006, 10:36 PM
Best white meat? He He...No...Seriously

Csspecs
April 21, 2006, 10:54 PM
What you need. (what I have)

A gun (no really?)
Heavy shot or bismuth shells for said gun
Something to go into the water with, a cheap plastic kayak painted will do.
A place to go (tricky one)

The rest is extra stuff that you would add if you want to do better.

Me and my brother go out during the week and try to get ducks in a canoe, just move slow and you can get a shot. Another time we moved the canoe out and covered it and took a nap from about 3 pm until around 5:30 when they came back in. It worked but it took a lot of time to get a duck.

Hello123
April 22, 2006, 10:40 PM
Gun, steel shot, camo including face mask and gloves, and means to get to the ducks, i.e. boots, waders, canoe/pirogue, or boat, and license with federal/state duck stamps. Leave the duck call at home until you can learn to blow it, you will scare off more ducks than you call in. Go for it, it is not brain surgery.

Scorch
April 23, 2006, 01:22 AM
I have to wonder what is considered dark meat???

FirstFreedom
April 23, 2006, 09:41 AM
and means to get to the ducks, i.e. boots, waders, canoe/pirogue, or boat,

Well, either that or just walk up to the edge of the pond/lake/creek/river and wait.

Essentials:

-Hunting license with federal waterfowl stamp
-Shotgun (20 ga or bigger) with steel or bismuth shot (bismuth preferred), and proficiency in using said shotgun at moving targets.
-Place to hunt where ducks are
-Camo, including head and hand covering (ducks see very well)
-Alarm clock - gotta get up about an hour before daybreak to get situated
-Knife to clean 'em if you get some
-Patience

Not essential, but preferred:
-boat and/or chest waders, to get to the best spots. If boat, then need a place/method to launch boat.
-camo'ed stool or chair to sit on to wait, if hunting from the bank
-decoys of the right species for your area
-calls and the knowledge to use them, including knowledge of the different types of ducks in your area, and which calls to use for which ducks (species-specific).
-other people to go with so you can space yourself around the area to form a web of fire to get the ducks if you miss or cannot get a shot.

Tangent: Yesterday while turkey hunting, I saw a mama wood duck with 6 ducklings do the classic fake-injury flapping in the water to draw my attention away from the ducklings when I surprised them...interesting.

And duck would be about as dark of a meat as it gets...guess you were kidding. Some like it, some don't. I can take or leave it.

stevelyn
April 23, 2006, 09:55 AM
razorburn,

I'm guessing the duck you ate was of the domestic variety rather than wild due to white meat reference.

Wild ducks and geese are long range fliers so all of their meat is dark and a little stronger tasting. Not offensive, but most uninitiated find they have to develope a taste for it.

A heads up....I don't know your grid coordinates, but just in case, stay away from sea duck species...........they suck.:barf:

jbadams66
April 23, 2006, 03:08 PM
I have to say that I have never had white meat from a duck.

Next what you really need is for someone to take you and teach you how to duck hunt. The material things are easy to get (gun, ammo, decoys and a place to hunt). Getting a duck to come into your spread really needs either luck or someone that knows what they are doing. Plus it is alot more fun if you can find someone that you enjoy hunting with.

Death from Afar
April 23, 2006, 03:41 PM
All you need is a dude who has done this a lot to take you out. Decide then if it is for you.

shureshot0471
April 23, 2006, 05:42 PM
Lissten get your 12 gauge a pair of waders about 1 dozen Decoys come winchester hv #4 shot in any length ger pretty cammoed out they will see you go hide in the trees around a body of water where you have been seeing the ducks and wait they will come I promise. Oh and by the way Duck is no where near a white meat.:D :D :D

Stiofan
April 23, 2006, 07:13 PM
Ahhh, wild duck, I love it. I like domestic too, but it's so far from it's wild cousin one would think it's a different species. I don't think I had domestic duck until I reached my 30s and tried it in a chinese restaurant. I'd take the wild over farmed everytime, but I was raised eating it.

Boy, do I wish it was October......

jamaica
April 25, 2006, 09:48 PM
All the duck I ever ate was dark meat.

The flavor of the meat varies widely and depends on species and what they have been eating. The flavor of home grown and grain fed duck is much better that most wild duck, especially the divers, which tend to be strong flavored.

My favorite recipe is: Soak the duck in wine over night. Cut the duck up for fish bait and drink the wine.

Personally, I would not start duck hunting for the purpose of obtaining meat.

Now duck hunting for the sport is another story.

Superhornet
April 26, 2006, 07:10 AM
I'll have the roast duck with the mango salsa.....IMHO

FirstFreedom
April 26, 2006, 09:34 AM
SH, lol, that commercial is awesome. I should have said above that decoys & calls are not necessary, but *highly* preferred.

PSE
April 26, 2006, 03:04 PM
i gave up duck hunting.
now i sit in a bath full of cold water and rip up $100 bills.
same results and i get to sleep later, yawn.

Scorch
April 26, 2006, 03:47 PM
Me too. Now I sleep til 9, have brunch, and go hunt pheasants. And I don't have to sit in cold water up to my . . .

NRA4life
April 26, 2006, 05:38 PM
PSE, that's funny. Reminds me of my last goose hunt, back around '86 or '87. We hunted around the Horicon and Theresa marshes in WI. The goose populations had gotten real low and you could draw exactly one, yes one goose tag per year for the zones around Horicon Marsh. I was now living in MO. So here's the tab:

Gas for the truck to and from WI: $50
Non-resident small game license: $63
one box steel shot: $25
Goose Tag: $7 (IIRC)
Grand Total: $145

Nothing priceless here either. I was in the blind for exactly 5 minutes and took a single shot and the hunt was over. Never went back.

Csspecs
April 27, 2006, 05:03 PM
So if you had sat in the blind for say a week, then it would be worth it? You did not have to take the shot, you could have sat there for a whole week if you wanted to.

As for the guy that said that duck is only good for fish bait, you must be shooting crappy fish ducks instead of a nice green head.

I almost got two geese last year, I was all of 30 feet from them. I had big shot and was about to mow both of their heads off. But I looked around and could not tell where I was, I did not know where the houses were so I did not take the shot..... Guess what.... Yep would have been two perfect shots no houses around at all.

NRA4life
April 27, 2006, 06:07 PM
It would have been worth it to sit in the blind for a week if I could have shot 50.

Death from Afar
April 27, 2006, 08:27 PM
I wont even begin to tell you how many ducks were shot out of our blind last year.....;)

T. O'Heir
April 28, 2006, 12:04 AM
"...most uninitiated find they have to develope a taste for it..." That's for sure. Domestic duck is fed totally different food than Daffy finds in the pond. The flavour is totally different. Domestic ducks tend to have more fat as well so they're greasier when cooked. Daffy is a lean bird. Just like other game.
"...duck hunting for the sport is another story..." Killing any game and leaving it there is illegal in most places.
"...tried it in a chinese restaurant..." If you ever saw what goes on in the kitchens of Chinese restaurants, you'd never eat in them again. Drove a truck, long ago, delivering supplies to Chinese restaurants. Haven't eaten Chinese since. Mind you, other restaurants aren't much better.

TexasCop
April 28, 2006, 01:21 PM
i don't think it's the best meat I've ever had, but I also enjoy it from time to time. most of my friends give me theirs cause they aren't that happy with it.

Superhornet
April 28, 2006, 01:54 PM
Hunted duck and cottontail along the Missouri and Big Sioux River running down Iowa, Nebr and South Dakota borders back in 49-50. Had an old 12 gauge with 32 inch barrel. The local hardware man would sell shotgun shells for 10 cents apiece...never knew that there was any other shell besides REM Shur shot 7 and a half. Would clean the
game when we got lucky and sell the duck and rabbit for 50 cents each to a bartender up in Jefferson, SD. Of course then to me there was no such thing as sport hunting. We ate a lot of duck and rabbit to survive. Don't remember ever selling enough duck to buy a whole box of shells. Had a corn stock blind built by a protected cove on the Big Sioux. Mallards would come in every morning. Never took a wing shot then, but would wait until a group was settled down and then cut loose...of course only got one shot...Was lucky once and got 5 ducks with one shot...

razorburn
May 11, 2006, 01:17 AM
Yeah, domestic duck at a restaurant. The meat was almost as light as chicken. Wild duck is much worse? The domestic duck was great. But it was a nice restaurant, and the meal was over $300 for us. I'm seriously suspecting that wild duck is not the same now after reading your posts. I have a canoe and a retriever. But the canoe is some immensely heavy, 150 lb mystery material affair, and the dog is scared of both water and guns... Does all wild meat taste worse than it's domestic counterpart? Any wild meat that tastes good? Does deer compare to a good cut of beef? Pheasant to good chicken?

Desertfox
May 11, 2006, 11:51 AM
Wild duck tastes like burnt liver to me. I gave up the sport after many failed attempts to cook and eat it.
I just hope someone will tell me how to cook a decent mallard drake. I love the hunting part but don't wish to kill something I am not going to eat. (except coyotes)
Lemme know how to prepare a duck I can eat. Thanks.

FirstFreedom
May 11, 2006, 12:38 PM
i gave up duck hunting.
now i sit in a bath full of cold water and rip up $100 bills.
same results and i get to sleep later, yawn.

Now that is comedy. :)

tBlake08
May 11, 2006, 04:20 PM
But the god honest truth.

casingpoint
May 11, 2006, 04:27 PM
I have eaten duck, and I have eaten crow. And duck is better.

UniversalFrost
May 11, 2006, 04:53 PM
Seriously, duck hunting in a canoe or kayak? If you have 2 shooters and both are aiming at the same side and both shoot close to the same time you will get dunked.

Here's what I use:

Mossberg 500 (28" barrel with full or mod. choke) 12 ga (fairly cheap and if you dunk it or lose it over the side not a complete loss compared to an 1187 remington)
Steel shot, sizes depends on what type of waterfowl shooting
12foot flat bottom jon boat with 10hp johnson short shaft
homemade blind to go over boat
a dozen or so decoys (make sure you put them out in the right setup or the ducks will see that something is up and fly high and away from you).
a good dog (I have labs) or a good set of hip/ chest waders
a call (get a cheap call with a video from walmart to learn then buy a better one when you get good)

gave up on duck hunting seriously and started hunting goose in the fields . My dog refused to go into the water one year when it was freezing and I ended up getting into the water and I understood exactly why he didn't want to freeze his balls off. Now both of us prefer the field hunting geese better (much dryer and your lower extremities don't turn blue).

happy hunting.

Also jump shooting a pond doesn't work that well in my experience even when you can sneak up close without them hearing you.

Wild duck is good (always dark meat), but the best I had was organic grown duck at a Thai restaurant with a nice crispy crust and sweet/sour sauce. Yum.

Mannlicher
May 11, 2006, 04:59 PM
I find most duck to be dark meat, not white like a chicken's.
I mostly duck hunt from a boat, with a buddy and his yellow Lab. We just do the normal thing, set out the decoys, use the call, and blast away.

gdeal
May 11, 2006, 05:06 PM
I don't like it. It's a pain to get the feathers out. Then there are all those pesky pellets. Stick to farm grown chicken. Much better and U can buy that in a store. Oh and I really wouldn't call duck white meat. Seems dark to me.

NRA4life
May 12, 2006, 12:57 PM
My mother used to cook wild ducks and geese that turned out great. We skinned all of ours versus plucking, it's a lot easier. She basically cooked them breast side up in an oven bag inside a roasting pan. The whole top breast section was seasoned and covered with bacon and the inside stuffed with apples and onions. The bacon kinda moisturized it and it turned out nice and tender when cooked long enough.

swampdog
May 12, 2006, 01:58 PM
Duck's pretty good, actually. My ex-wife used to fix it similar to NRA4Life. Instead of apples, she'd use regular stuffing or an oyster stuffing. I'll have to try the apple idea. It's the bacon on top and the roasting bag that really makes it good. Even wood ducks are pretty good when given this treatment. +1 one the skinning. I gave up on plucking them, quickly.
I too have eaten badly cooked duck. Describing it as tasting like burnt liver would be an insult to the liver.
Someone asked a few posts back how deer compares with beef. I actually prefer venision to beef when roasted but nothing beats a chargrilled beef steak. I've found that deer that are killed quickly and unalarmed are much better than one that has been run for a couple of hours. A young doe is the best eating, as would be expected. The main thing about getting quality venision is taking care of the meat after the kill. You wouldn't ride around with a 100lb tuna on your tailgate. Don't do it with a deer. Don't over cook it, either. It's not pork.
There is really no comparision between deer jerky and beef jerky. Deer wins, hands down.
YUM, YUM, YUM!

Csspecs
May 12, 2006, 05:00 PM
I am going to clean mine on the boat this year (after toping them use a large coffee can to keep them from walking around). Just keep the parts so you don't tick off the DNR guy.

I also find that the faster that game is cleaned the better it tastes. I take fillets of fish as soon as I can, and off them as soon as I know they are legal.

fowlweather
May 23, 2006, 01:27 PM
If you want to sweeten up that mallard taste:
Breast em
Chunk the breast
Soak a few hours in OJ, couple dashes of soy sauce and garlic salt
powder them with flour
and deep fry til golden

best you'll ever get and it's easy to find pellets before cooking

IMHO

boyera
May 31, 2006, 01:48 PM
i will agree with many here, waterfowl hunting is expensive, but when u get into them it is a blast. the main things u need to get started would be 1)20 gauge or bigger and steel shot 2) ducks or geese to hunt 3) a spot where the ducks or geese go.
the most important thing that i haved learned about waterfowl hunting is you almost always have to be in a field or water where the birds are going. If you don't find one of them two spots ur screwed most of the time. Geese and ducks have to be one of the most stubborn animals i have ever hunted. if they don't like what they see they will go somewhere else, and thats a fact.(Personal experiance)

good luck and hunt safe:cool:

youp
May 31, 2006, 03:40 PM
You will need a shotgun and some stick-to-it-ness. Everything else is not required for jump shooting ducks. If you fish, use your rod and reel to cast a plug across a dead duck. If not you probably need to start fishing while you are at it.

There are alot of other things you may want to get after you get started. Just remember, you need a gun and ammo to be hunting... everything else is not really required.

duckmart
May 31, 2006, 11:32 PM
Most wild ducks do have a gammy taste to them, however, ducks (like people) are what they eat. If there are mud divers they will taste pretty rude, but some like the teal, I have found taste pretty dam good. My recipe for most wild ducks: Soak the breasts (dark meat) in soy sause for about two hours or so, add sea salt, balsamic vinager, chop up and add 1 clove of garlic, pan fry (in olive oil) or barbque, don't over cook.

quack fiend
June 1, 2006, 06:58 AM
i hated duck until i tried this--breast them out (no skin), cut the breasts into thin fajita-type strips, place in salt-water in fridge for a couple days to get blood out (change the water a few times)--use the meat with an old el paso soft taco kit instead of beef, the chili powder seasoning in the kit totally hides the gaminess, i also add some lime juice and garlic powder as it cooks, fine eatin'.....

johnbt
June 2, 2006, 08:01 PM
The guy I hunt with has got to be one of the best game cooks. He's been cooking ducks and geese for 30 years and he ages them for a week or two (or more I think, but he won't admit to it.) He bleeds them and either leaves them outside if it's cold enough or throws them in the refrigerator until they're "ready" to mess with.

Even if you cook them without aging you have to know how to soak them and how many times to change the soak. Everybody seems to have a favorite - saltwater, milk, buttermilk, vinegar, etc.

OTOH, the best duck dinner I ever had was in a little Chinese place London. They had pressed ducks hanging in the front window of this tiny restaurant and I think the four of us drank two bottles of wine while we waited for them to prepare out dinner. Maybe it was three bottles. ;) I love visiting people who know all of the good places.

John

P.S. - I just did a little surfing. Here's a recipe from the americansportsman site that uses sauerkraut. (SAUERKRAUT????)

Soak in salt water overnight. Drain, wash in cold water. Fill cavity with sauerkraut. Lay strips of salt pork or bacon on breast. Bake at 425 degrees. Baste with hot water, then drippings from pan.

Instead of sauerkraut you can fill cavity with: one small onion, one stalk celery with leaves, one small apple-discard after cooking.

AndrewD
June 4, 2006, 10:48 AM
Even domestic duck isn't usually white in my experience. I guess those ugly Muscovys are whitish. I wonder if they fed you chicken on the sly.

razorburn
June 13, 2006, 02:05 AM
It's duck for sure, it was a whole roast duck and still recognizable. It was an off-white color, but definately not dark like beef. I had some more at asian restaurants while I was on vacation in the Hainan Islands. Roast duck with plum sauce. Very good stuff. But apparently, wild duck may not taste the same. Still, it gives me an excuse to buy a Remington 870, right? ;) Everybody should have one of those.