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OneInTheChamber
April 2, 2006, 02:30 PM
Do you sleep with you glasses, contacts, or whatever in/on at night. I was thinking about it last night; since I sleep without my glasses on, that it would take atleast 3-5 extra seconds to put them on in an emergency. I'm too blind without them to be picking up a gun. I need to be able to see what I'm might be shooting at.

What do you do??

springmom
April 2, 2006, 04:24 PM
I can certainly see the COM on a BG well enough without my glasses. I need them for target shooting more because I can't see the holes without them, but I can see the target itself. Don't sleep with your glasses on, you'll just break them.

Springmom

delta58
April 2, 2006, 04:37 PM
I only need reading glasses but the front is getting fuzzy, I'm looking at a laser sight for my home defense gun.

The Pilgrim
April 2, 2006, 05:55 PM
I am extremely nearsighted (20/475 right eye, 20/500 left eye) and I do not think it is practical to sleep with glasses ot contacts. Uncorrected my eyes are mote than twice the "legally blind" limit, but I can see well enough to recognize a person I know 10 or 12 feet away.

Dave R
April 2, 2006, 05:56 PM
I am counting on my dog to give me enough warning to put on the glasses.

riverrat66
April 2, 2006, 07:05 PM
I've always said that owning a dog was the next best thing to owning a firearm for the simple reason that anyone who is stupid enough to enter my home after hearing my 90# dog bark deserves to be shot! :rolleyes:

18DAI
April 2, 2006, 07:24 PM
Springmom - My eyes are getting to where I can't see the hits at 15 yards. I recently tried the Shoot-N-See targets. They are reactive and light up lime green where you hit. If you already know about this please disregard. Regards 18DAI.

Shootinskeet
April 2, 2006, 08:04 PM
I will have to agree with having a dog in the house is the best
alarm you could buy. Never have to worry about forgetting to set the alarm or anything.
I have a dog door just so the dog can run the entire fence line at any time. Just have to get your dogs poisen trained so they wont take or pick up anything from anyone.

Aaron

Puppy
April 2, 2006, 09:32 PM
I usually dont bother with fishing around on my headboard for my glasses if I hear a "bump in the night".

I have a set of Crimson Trace Laser Grips on my carry gun, I highly recomind them on defensive handguns.

BillCA
April 2, 2006, 11:13 PM
Near your gun should be a strong light -- a pushbutton maglite, sure-fire or even a bright LED light. This is especially true for those of us with myopia (nearsightedness) so you can illuminate and identify a questionable target.

Those of us who've had small kids and used night lights in bathrooms or kids' bedrooms know that these little lights can provide enough illumination to see a silhouette. Putting one at the bottom of a stairwell will show their shadow as they move upstairs.

Lasers are good things, however remember they don't illuminate your target for identification as well as a good bright light. Bright lights blind your opponent, allow you to see who they are as well as where.

Twycross
April 3, 2006, 01:13 AM
My eyes are just over the legal limit to drive, but I can see fine for all practical purposes. So no, I don't sleep with my glasses on or even very near. I don't think I would need them.

Derius_T
April 3, 2006, 01:26 AM
I wear contacts during the day, but do keep a pair of glasses on the headboard, right next to my .45 and a good 4 D-cell Mag-Lite.

My eyes are pretty bad, so I would always try to get the glasses on. Hopefully the old grumpy chow that sleeps by the door will give me enough time for it. :D

Ga Johnny
April 3, 2006, 06:50 AM
I've been putting glasses on in the dark for more years than I care to mention, so I don't give it much thought. If the time it takes to put on your glasses is an issue, you may want to consider moving to a safer part of town. If I found myself needing to catch a few ZZZZ's in a place like Bagdad then I would just sleep with them on.

pax
April 3, 2006, 10:37 AM
My glasses stay on my nightstand when I sleep, and I am very nearsighted.

I often practice shooting without my prescription glasses on (but with eye protection of course). I know that I am able to hit center mass out to any distance at which I could identify a target. That helps.

My bedside gun is also equipped with Crimson Trace laser grips. Even if everything is fuzzy, I'll be able to see that dot. That helps, too.

My bedroom door is always locked at night. That should give me the extra 1/2 second to get my glasses on in the first place.

I also have developed the habit, over the years, of putting on my glasses before I do anything else when my eyes come open in the night -- you will never find me wandering around the house without them on. If I need to jump out of the window to escape a fire the odds are I won't have a robe on but my glasses will be on my face.

pax

Shawn Dodson
April 3, 2006, 11:49 AM
I'm legally blind without corrective lenses. When I go to bed at night I put my eyeglasses on the nightstand beside me.

However, when I wake up I just don't have any problem seeing. I simply don't notice that my vision is impaired without my glasses. (The problem I expereince is adjusting to impaired vision after I've been wearing my eyeglasses and then take them off.)

When I played HS football in the 70s, there really weren't any sports frames for eyeglasses. (And even if there were some halfway decent sports frames back then we couldn't have afforded them.) I practiced and played without my eyeglasses. I played well, and never had a problem I could relate to not wearing corrective lenses.

I train at the shooting range without corrective lenses, a must, IMO if you wear eyeglasses.

My patrol eyeglasses were prescription safety frames, solid nose piece, and spring hinge temples. I carried a pair of those godawful ugly black Cris Combat Specticles, which are equipped with a rubber head strap, in my breast pocket as spares in case my primary pair got broken in a fight or lost.

I wrote an article, published in Law and Order magazine in 1994, for patrol officers who wear eyeglasses.

SBrocker8
April 3, 2006, 12:37 PM
This is definitely something I've had to consider, as I'm pretty nearsighted. One of the main reasons I want to absolutely be able to avoid fistfights is my glasses. It's not that I can't see someone in my face without them and continue to fight them, it's just that I'm pretty hesitant to do much without the glasses.

I've also had to take into consideration the glasses in an emergency like a fire or break in. They stay right next to me on the night stand, right next to my alarm clock. No pistol there yet, as I'm not yet 21 (just a few more months!), but the glasses, folding knife, and pepper spray are all within EASY reach, at EXACTLY the same spot, ALWAYS.

Capt Charlie
April 3, 2006, 12:42 PM
I train at the shooting range without corrective lenses, a must, IMO if you wear eyeglasses.
Outstanding!

And something I've never given a thought to in the past. That's about to change. I think it would be prudent, though, to have someone there with good vision coaching you.... just in case ;) .

My dog would also give me plenty of warning, but it wouldn't be from barking. Nope. It would come from her physically lifting my bed up as she tries to get her 206 pound butt under it to hide :D .

Sweatnbullets
April 3, 2006, 10:25 PM
IDing the threat is the top priority. My vision is bad but not so bad that I can not make the ID.

This is one of the reason that I looked into threat focus skills. My ability to shift my focal plane from the threat to the sights has detriorated over the years. It takes time to bring my focus back to the sights. Therefore I looked into threat focus skills. Something that all of the older eyes out there may want to consider.

Skyguy
April 3, 2006, 11:01 PM
My ability to shift my focal plane from the threat to the sights has detriorated over the years. It takes time to bring my focus back to the sights.


I've been trying to tell you guys with bad eyes to get lasergrips. Come join us in the 21st century. :)

"In my youth, I was a champion shooter and called 'The Modern Day Gunfighter'. As I aged a bit and began wearing bifocal lenses, it became very difficult to adjust my focus from the front sights to the target.

I tried Crimson Trace Lasergrips and was sold immediately. I now can carry a pistol and shoot accurately beyond 50 yards. I can once again carry a firearm with confidence."

—Jim Cirillo, LE Trainer, Author, Retired NYPD and US Customs, 17-0 Record Against Armed Felons
.

kozak6
April 3, 2006, 11:09 PM
I would never sleep with my glasses on. The frames would be completely destroyed by morning, the way I toss and turn.

I am not quite as bad off as some of you guys, but I know I can see well enough to score a hit anywhere in my house (or backyard).

Derius_T
April 4, 2006, 01:46 PM
SkyGuy wrote:

I've been trying to tell you guys with bad eyes to get lasergrips. Come join us in the 21st century.

While laser sighting may help with aquiring your target, it does no good in helping bad eyes RECOGNIZE or ID a target......

And, IMHO laser sighting devices make one lazy, and can make you a poor shot overall. After so much time depending on the little dot to do the work for you, it seems your basic aiming skills (ie using your sights) would degrade. No thanks. I won't bet my life on the effectivness of a battery. ;)

Puppy
April 4, 2006, 02:05 PM
Derius_T,

You do realize that laser sights dont replace your handguns existing iron sights ...

The rest of your comments about laser sights making someone "lazy" & a "poor shot overall" with iron sights is just assinine hogwash.

Skyguy
April 4, 2006, 03:24 PM
Derius_T said:

While laser sighting may help with aquiring your target, it does no good in helping bad eyes RECOGNIZE or ID a target......

Agreed. If your eyesight is so bad that you can't recognize a threat or see the target, lasergrips won't help. If you're caught in that situation, just don't shoot. Pray.
Tactically speaking, laser sights are helpful for aging eyes that can no longer focus on the front sight and/or the target. They are the ideal sighting system for nearly any threat focused shooting...whether indoors, in low light or darkness. They're even effective in broad daylight.

No thanks. I won't bet my life on the effectivness of a battery.

Yet, you'll trust your life to the less than 100% reliabilty of firearms, smoke alarms, et al?
.

Derius_T
April 5, 2006, 12:22 AM
Puppy wrote:

Derius_T,

You do realize that laser sights dont replace your handguns existing iron sights ...

The rest of your comments about laser sights making someone "lazy" & a "poor shot overall" with iron sights is just assinine hogwash.

My, my, what a nasty little puppy. Someone should whack you with a newspaper and teach you some manners. :barf:

FYI, I am very much aware that laser sights are not replacements for existing sights. I dare say I have most likely used them more often than you have seen them in the movies.

And it stands to reason, that once a firearm is properly sighted in with a laser, it does negate the use of the natural sights. After all, why on earth would you use a laser at all, other than to give you a faster way to aquire your target, from various distances, without having to concentrate on your existing sights!? Thats WHY THEY WERE CREATED. And I have personally seen guys who were great shots, switch to almost exclusively using optics, and over time, they lost their sharpness with 'iron sights'.

But don't let my personal experiences that I know to be fact sway your almighty opinion pup.....:rolleyes:

Derius_T
April 5, 2006, 12:29 AM
SkyGuy wrote:

Yet, you'll trust your life to the less than 100% reliabilty of firearms, smoke alarms, et al?

I have no CHOICE but to bet my life on the mechanical ability of my firearm to go boom. If you use a quality, proven firearm, quality ammo, and properly care for your weapon, it will most likely take care of you. Sure there is a percentage of failure, but a much lower percentage to fail using iron sights as opposed to an added-on, battery powered aiming system.

As for smoke alarms, they are merely a backup warning system. Its crazy to just leave your safety to a machine....IMHO. Always have more than one option.....

Skyguy
April 5, 2006, 11:38 AM
Sure there is a percentage of [weapon] failure, but a much lower percentage to fail using iron sights as opposed to an added-on, battery powered aiming system.

Iron sights are next to useless in low light and darkness where over 70% of armed confrontations take place.
You'll end up point shooting in those situations.

You can significantly reduce your exposure from behind cover, horizontal or vertical, by using a laser vs iron sights.
Wounded, panicked, weak hand, prone?.....a laser sight can save your life.
Bifocals, lost glasses, awkward positions, under/over/around cover?...you'll shoot accurately with a laser sight. It's that simple.

Laser sights should be used in conjunction with and 'not' to replace iron sights or basic training.
They're a multifaceted alternative and a superior threat focused sighting system.

The bottom line is that a laser sight is unquestionably a distinct tactical advantage in diminished light, low-light, and near-total darkness, on stationary and moving targets, in the open or shooting from cover, two-handed or one, strong or weak hand.

Try one, you'll never look back. :)
.

pax
April 5, 2006, 11:53 AM
When I think about it, I think "batteries can fail" is absolutely the silliest reason not to like laser sights that I can think of. Of course the iron sights will still be there even if the laser doesn't work, but that's not my main point.

Your gun can fail if it gets too dirty and gunked up, or if the springs get too worn out. So what do you do? Why, you keep it clean, of course. And you check and replace the springs from time to time. It's just routine maintenance.

It ain't all that hard to change batteries from time to time, when you are doing the other routine maintenance a lifesaving gun might require.

But I guess if you're the kind of person who can't be bothered to do routine maintenance on gear you trust your life to, the objection makes sense.

pax

mgdavis
April 5, 2006, 12:40 PM
I finally got contact lenses that I can wear for a week straight. This was a huge improvement over having to grab my glasses, as I have very poor uncorrected vision. I can now read the clock next to my bed when I wake up in the night, too.

PATH
April 5, 2006, 01:00 PM
I have myopia and cannot see too well at distance especially at night. I like the dog idea that was mentioned here. My dog would bark and then lick a burglar. The barking is handy as I keep my eyeglasses on the nightstand. It takes me at most 2 seconds to get the eyeglasses on and another second to get the gun in the nightstand. 3 seconds can be an eternity though. Maybe LASIK would be an option for some here. I hear it works wonders.

riverrat66
April 5, 2006, 02:56 PM
Maybe LASIK would be an option for some here. I hear it works wonders.
I got a pamphlet about LASIK Eye Surgery but that's as far as I got. I understand it's pretty expensive. I may still look into it because my eyes are getting worse and it's becoming harder to focus on the sights.

Not to get off topic again but what Skyguy said is right. Lasers are great! I had one on my Glock 26 when they first came out and it was absolutely amazing until I broke it. But today they are made much better (and cheaper) and the battery lasted forever. :D

Derius_T
April 5, 2006, 05:27 PM
pax:

I have no CHOICE but to bet my life on the mechanical ability of my firearm to go boom. If you use a quality, proven firearm, quality ammo, and properly care for your weapon, it will most likely take care of you.

So as you can see, I am not a guy who does not maintain my weapons, so what you said was kinda unnessessary. They make night sights for weapons specifically designed to help in low-light situations. They also, if you are inclined, make compact lighting systems that light up the area the second you put finger to trigger.

I just have seen guys get lazy, relying on a laser system, and lose the ability to fight properly without it after extended use. It is something I have SEEN and not just read about, so I have to take that into consideration, FOR ME.

Also, yes, its quite easy to change a battery every so often along with routine maintenance. But they still fail. I don't want to add one more thing that could possibly go wrong when my life depends on it. There are too many variables as it is.....