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Doug63
March 11, 2006, 12:09 PM
Any readers hunt nutria. If so, what’s your favorite firearm and caliber you use?

I personally like the 870 Wingmaster 12 gage using 1 1/4oz steel BBs, it simply cuts them down but they are range limited.

On the longer side I have been using my dad’s old Remingtion model 34 a 22Lr with peep sights, I would keep using this thing, it but the barrel’s frosted. I can just about group with in a dime at 10 yds. but watch out at 25yds, and you need a 3x3 bandaid to cover the group. Its seen better days. :barf:

New on the horizon is a CZ 452 or 453, not sure which model yet either the American or Vermint, but more importantly I have not decided on the caliber. What are your thoughts .17, .22Lr, or 22mag... for Nutria?

fisherman66
March 11, 2006, 12:16 PM
500 rounds at less than $10.00 (OK...that's bulk; I know)

or

50 rounds at less than $10.00

The classic .22lr will never be beat as the most fun and inexpensive cartridge to shoot. I bet the Velocitors would be a great rounds for your river rats.

loggerhead
March 11, 2006, 12:55 PM
Doug, I use a shot gun with #4 buck when I am shooting from a boat because it is usually rocking and hard to hit them rascals with a rifle.
when shooting from a steady base I use a .222 with a 45gr bullet.
When I ride the barrow pits on the 4wheeler i use the .222 to shoot um on the other side.

VWTim
March 11, 2006, 04:43 PM
Do you have any good spots for Nutria from PDX south? I live in Corvallis and I'm looking for some varmint hunting now that I've got more time on my hands...gf moved out.

Doug63
March 11, 2006, 07:12 PM
I do not know of any place south of PDX. You might try talking with the ODFW or better yet Ducks Unlimited they are involved in quite a few wetland projects and they might know of some areas where Nutria are thieving.

I do not think wild life refuges will let you in to hunt but it won’t hurt to ask, the worst is they say no. I expect you will be knocking on some private land owners doors for permission to scout out their drainage ditches and ponds with the intent to hunt.

shureshot0471
March 13, 2006, 11:27 PM
.22-.250 it is really nasty:D :D :D

Death from Afar
March 14, 2006, 01:21 AM
What on earth is a nutria? sounds like something you put on toast.

DWARREN123
March 14, 2006, 06:09 AM
22 mag! CZ American 453. I believe you would love this setup.

Wild Bill Bucks
March 14, 2006, 01:20 PM
Only time I ever saw a nutria was at Lake Fork Texas. They are everywhere down there but they are protected,I think.
Are they good for eating or are they a pelt animal?
I would think that a good 22 mag, or maybe .17 would be suffecient to snuff one out.
Are they a pest or a game animal?:confused:

marks655
March 14, 2006, 01:28 PM
I love to shoot Nutrea!

Large swamp in Green Co. Alabama late Feb. on sunny days we sometimes shot over 300 in an afternoon. That swamp has lots of my .223 cases in it.

More fun than prarie dogs because you have a lot more shots but not as much fun as prarie dogs because nutrea don't fly-up in the air and come apart like the dogs do. I guess they are too big. At least for an AR15. One in our party shot them with a 45-70. It was hard to tell what really happened to the nutrea when he hit them because it was more like a small mortar round impact than a shot.

I used one of several AR15s A service rifle config worked fine for most but sometimes I also used a varmit config AR for longer shots.

Used everything from 69 gr to 50gr varmit-type bullets.

Now I live in Kansas and suffer fron nutrea-withdrawl.:(

swampdog
March 14, 2006, 02:16 PM
I use whatever I've got in the truck when I see one, usually a .22. Nutria are
bigtime pests, have no value what so ever as food or fur and compete for
resources that native species use. I like using my k-22 revolver or a .22
rifle. Nutria get big and you need to hit them right with a .22 or they'll just
keep swimming. Use whatever you want but kill every one you get the chance
to.
If you start seeing lots of nutria, you won't see any muskrats, after awhile.
The nutria just take over. They originally came up from South America, possibly
as stowaways on ships. They are considered an undesirable exotic and you
are doing our native species a big favor to kill them. Local land owners will
thank you, too.

Have fun.

Csspecs
March 15, 2006, 10:19 AM
I have heard that they taste ok-good. But I have never tryed one as I don't thing they are in my state. Try it, somethings just get a bad rep for no reason. Like dogfish no one will eat them as they look ugly, but they taste much better than catfish.

Long Path
March 15, 2006, 11:32 AM
I've seen quite a few in our area (D/FW, TX). They look like beaver, at first glance, and are just about as big. I would think that a very accurate .22 WMRF would be perfect. For a little more reach without getting REALLY loud, I would go to the .22 Hornet. While I'm sure that most of 'em could be killed with a perfect .22 LR shot, some of the larger specimens look like they could use more kiling. (Alas, I've always been in urban areas like golf courses when I've seen them.)

Friends, please be cautious when shooting at these aquatic rodent pests when they're in the water; skips off the water are easy to cause, and can create a tragedy for people on the other side.

NRA4life
March 15, 2006, 02:41 PM
If anybody's interested, there's a dedicated website for them, nutria.com

shureshot0471
March 16, 2006, 01:45 AM
Dont ever hook one when you are fishin they will strip the gears in your reel.:D :D :D

Dave R
March 16, 2006, 06:54 PM
have no value what so ever as food or furI read an article today in Field & Stream on "Lost Skills of Trout Fishing." It said Nutria hide (w/ fur) was a good material for tying streamers.

Of course, one Nutria is probably a lifetime supply, so what do you do with the other few hundred?

Scorch
March 16, 2006, 07:51 PM
People used to raise nutria for the fur. It was used in making felt for hats (much like beaver used to be used) or for making low-end fur coats (like muskrat was used). Really nice pelt.
I have used a 22-250 and a 223 on nutria (can you say CHUNKY?). I know people who use their deer rifles on them. But I still prefer the 22 LR. Just pennies a shot, and a good head shot makes them just lay right down. If you do hit them in the body it has no discernible immediate effect, but a while later they die.
If you are looking for a place to hunt them, go over towards the coast and find a stream or a pond. You'll find nutria.

FirstFreedom
March 16, 2006, 09:48 PM
I've never seen one, and I certainly didn't realize they have migrated up to the pacific northwest - wow - I thought they were limited to the wet far south (tx, la, etc.). DFA, they are a south american native species that has proven very successful in souther usa as an introduced species. Like a large muskrat or a beaver without the flat tail, they breed like rabbits, and are quite a nuisance in places like louisiana. Even here in oklahoma, you can shoot them year-round (like coyotes, feral hogs, & beavers) - so they are definitely considered a nuisance species. This describes their destructiveness as an introduced species:

http://www.lacoast.gov/watermarks/2000b-06/2nutria/index.htm
http://www.sgnis.org/kids/suspect_nick.html
http://www.southerner.net/v3n1_2002/nutria1.html
http://cse.pdx.edu/wetlands/nwnutria.dir/nutr_072998.html

BUT....

have no value what so ever as food or fur

http://www.nutria.com/site14.php

FirstFreedom
March 16, 2006, 10:54 PM
say, DFA, you get hit by the Volcano?

http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/03/16/nz.volcano/index.html?section=cnn_latest

Death from Afar
March 17, 2006, 12:50 AM
He he- yeah, shame about that dude missing.

If you look at the picture on the CNN story, that particular volcano overlooks officer cadet school- its the armys biggest training area. We were out in the field and the Exercise was stopped as someone pointed out that we were on the point of getting some hot magma in our firing pits...that was an exciting exercise!

swampdog
March 17, 2006, 08:19 AM
FirstFreedom,
Yum. I'll save that recipe with the one I've got for "planked shad". You know
the one were you season the shad and smoke it on a board by a slow fire.
When it's done, throw the fish away and eat the board.

Guess I was wrong about the food or fur. I can't see buying my wife a nutria
coat, though. What were they thinking? They imported mongoose into Cuba
to control the snakes, too. Not a real good idea.

I did discover a use for nutria, however. A friend of mine who is a commercial
fisherman and avid nutria hunter uses the guts and carcasses to bait crab pots.

Smoke Screen
March 17, 2006, 02:39 PM
Where in OR do you live? P-town? I live in La Grande and didn't know we had nutria here. Where do you go to hunt them? I'd like to hop on it too! Where, where!? :D

-SS

FirstFreedom
March 18, 2006, 08:36 PM
planked shad". You know
the one were you season the shad and smoke it on a board by a slow fire.
When it's done, throw the fish away and eat the board.

:eek: :D

Smoke Screen, my fourth link above has a quote:

"They have popped up elsewhere in the country - including Oregon's Willamette Valley -"

Glad you're ok, DFA.

Smoke Screen
March 18, 2006, 09:09 PM
First Freedom,

I'm going to visit family the end of may in OK, (lake Tenkiller/Tulsa area) Where are the closest sightings of Nutria in that area? Any hints would be greatly appreciated! :cool:

FirstFreedom
March 19, 2006, 04:15 PM
I don't know, SS. But a quick search turned up a link to nutria hunting at and near Broken Bow lake in far Southeastern OK, which makes a lot of sense, being a wet area - the farther south and/or east you go, and the more water, the more nutria. But I also found a link to nutria being near Kaw Lake with is in far north central OK as well, so I'd say keep googling, and if you want to see okla. state public hunting lands (WMAs), go look here:

http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/wmas2.htm

http://maps.scigis.com/odwc/MapFrame.asp

look for marshes/wetlands.

http://www.lakesandreservoirs.com/Oklahoma/KawLake/KawLake.php?Attraction_ID=OK06lk002a002

http://www.lakesandreservoirs.com/Oklahoma/BrokenBowLake/BrokenBowLake.php

Eghad
March 19, 2006, 04:41 PM
In Texas Nutria are considered fur bearing animals. They can only be taken by permission from the property owner or you are the property owners agent.
They are taken while causing loss or damage to agricultural crops, livestock,
poultry, or personal property.

In Texas now you must also make sure the bullet doesnt cross property lines :eek:
unless you own both pieces of property or have permission from the property owner.

hpg
March 19, 2006, 04:47 PM
Nutria=water Rat

FirstFreedom
March 19, 2006, 07:28 PM
squirrel = limb rat
deer = hooved forest rat
rabbit = brush rat

they all taste good, so I would assume nutria does too. Nutria - the other white rat meat. :)

Huffmanite
March 19, 2006, 11:02 PM
Recently in Maryland. Surprised to read in their state hunting pamphlet that year round hunting with no limit on Nutria allowed. Thought nutria a Gulf Coast problem.

Doug63
March 22, 2006, 01:35 AM
I have been on the road working and letting my nutria haunts rest so they can become stupid and less wary again.
Yes, I live in P-town aka Pork-Land where the Oregon tax dollars go. :rolleyes:

Sorry I can help you about the La Grand area but as I mentioned on an earlier post you might want to check with Duck unlimited I know they do not like them in Duck habitats. ODFW might be able to help but my money is on DU. Check out Nutria.com and Google Nutria you’ll get a quite a few hits and you can learn about their preferred habitat and habits. Then you’ll at least know there they might be and what to look for.

I have seen Nutria as far south as Salem and east to Troutdale but I do not know if they have made it to the East side yet. I am sure they will. The rats are adaptive and its only a mater of time some PILLOW BITING PETA MEMBER take a couple home and releases them on the east side bacause thier adorable. :barf: For all I know they may already be there.

As for eating nutria I have never had the pleasure I leave them for the Hawks and the other scavengers.