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View Full Version : Help!! I need to dissasemble a cylinder


Chris D
August 23, 2000, 01:58 PM
on a S&W 337 Airweight Ti.

The very center (plunger?) rod is binding in the ejector shaft. I suspect there is some crud, a burr or what preventing it from sliding freely.

I'll send it back, but if I can fix it myself all the better!

Chris

James K
August 23, 2000, 03:43 PM
Note that, if not done properly, this procedure can mar the knurling on the ejector rod and/or crush the ejector rod. With the caution that if you get in trouble, don't blame me, here goes.

Swing open the cylinder. Remove the cylinder yoke screw (the front sideplate screw) and draw the yoke and cylinder forward off the frame. Leave the yoke and the cylinder together.

Clamp the front of the ejector rod in a copper jawed vise. Do not use pliers or vise-grips on either the rod or the cylinder.

Place 2 or 3 empty cartridge cases in the chambers to take the strain off the extractor. Now, looking at the back of the cylinder, turn the cylinder to the RIGHT, clockwise. THE THREADS ON THE EXTRACTOR ROD ARE LEFT HAND THREADS!!!!!!

Once started, the extractor should come out easily. Reassemble in reverse, remembering to turn the cylinder to the LEFT to screw the rod back in.

Jim

Jim V
August 23, 2000, 10:04 PM
DO NOT REEF on the cylinder when tightening the ejector rod. You may want to take it out again.

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Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
"If there be treachery, let there be jehad!"

Chris D
August 24, 2000, 07:19 AM
Thanks! Thats what I thought, except for the op-handed threads. And I would not have thought to put any empty brass in place. (good tip!!!)

Thanks again

Chris

James K
August 24, 2000, 05:43 PM
Since S&W switched to the left handed threads so that cylinder rotation won't loosen the ejector rod, there is no real need to tighten the rod extremely tight. Some people used to put Loc-Tite or even varnish on the threads, but this is no longer necessary.

Jim

PKAY
August 25, 2000, 05:01 PM
I popped for an ejector rod removal tool for S&W from Brownells. The thing is shaped like a 2 1/2" donut with a split controlled by an Allen bolt. You simply slide the "donut" over the rod and position it close to the front of the cylinder. Tighten the Allen bolt to squeeze the "donut" tight to the ejector rod and, gripping the knurled outer surface (of the "donut," not the ejector rod), unscrew CLOCKWISE. Everything will come out easily. After cleaning reverse the process. DON'T OVERTIGHTEN! Just good and snug. It's a little more expensive, but I get "queezy" gripping an ejector rod in a vice and then torquing the cylinder using empty brass and a screwdriver as a breaker bar.

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Safe shooting - PKAY

James K
August 26, 2000, 11:30 PM
No argument that the tool is better. But I took out a lot of rods using the technique I described without a special tool. They were not even available when I started gunsmithing.

Jim

Chris D
August 29, 2000, 07:35 AM
Thanks for all the info....

I ended up sending it back to them (S&W) The gun has only 150 rounds through it and they sent me a pre paid shipping label. Since I live in MA I should have it back soon (fingers crossed).

Chris

PKAY
August 29, 2000, 04:25 PM
Jim - The S&W ejector rod seems easy to remove, especially with the tool I mentioned earlier. But what do you do for the Colt revolvers? The Smith tool doesn't work for them. The threads are right hand (normal) as I've been told. And even with the correct tool from Brownells, I've been cautioned not to remove it at all unless absolutely necessary. On my Python the ejector rod appears to be "staked" to the ejector star, so I clean it without taking it apart. Any thoughts on this?

James K
August 29, 2000, 06:10 PM
Hi, PKAY,

I agree. I do not recommend removing the ejector/extractor from any S&W or Colt revolver unless necessary. There should be no cleaning or normal maintenance requiring removal.

If necessary to remove the extractor on a Colt, here is the procedure.

On the new Colts (J frame and newer Pythons) the setup is like the S&W, but without the center pin in the middle of the ejector rod. The rod screws off. Threads are right hand. Watch carefully the order of the parts as you take them out.

On the older Colts, the ratchet (extractor star) screws onto the ejector rod. You have to push the ejector back so the ratchet clears the cylinder, and then unscrew the ratchet from the back of the rod. There is a tool to do this, which has two padded prongs to fit into the cartridge cuts on the ratchet. What I did, though, was to lightly clamp the star into a plastic or copper jawed vise and then hand turn the cylinder. When you put things back together, you will have to stake the star onto the rod.

Jim

[This message has been edited by Jim Keenan (edited August 29, 2000).]

PKAY
August 31, 2000, 01:30 PM
Jim, thanks for the info on Colt revolver extractor rod removal. I guess it's the "staking" part that bothers me when putting the assembly back together. If it's been staked once already, and the staking purchase has to be removed or overcome by unscrewing the ratchet only to be re-staked upon reassembly, it would indicate that the manufacturer didn't really intend the user to be routinely removing and replacing same often. Also, it seems like the fully reassembled cylinder cum extractor rod would pose an awkward positioning angle for re-staking as recommended.

The reason I often remove the extractor rod from my S&W's is to clean and lubricate it (gives it a nice "spin" too). The Colt's I have avoided for reasons you have stated.

Thanks again for your thoughtful response.

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Safe shooting - PKAY

James K
August 31, 2000, 05:37 PM
You are correct in that neither maker ever intended the extractor to be removed as part of routine cleaning.

There is no real need to remove the extractor rod on a Smith, either. Just a little spray cleaner (I use G96 Gun Treatment) under the extractor, a quick brush out with a nylon brush, and a drop of oil on the stem. Another drop of oil on the ratchet will work its way into the pin hole and if you want, one more drop in the front of the rod.

Jim

Chris D
September 14, 2000, 06:49 AM
Got it back from S&W last friday.

All better, and with me today....

Thanks again for the help

Chris