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Dangus
August 14, 2000, 11:18 PM
If someone were to make a custom calibur. How do they find info on making the brass, and the slugs, etc?

I am curious about making a 6.5x50mm round. Is this practical?

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I twist the facts until they tell the truth. -Some intellectual sadist

The Bill of Rights is a document of brilliance, a document of wisdom, and it is the ultimate law, spoken or not, for the very concept of a society that holds liberty above the desire for ever greater power. -Me

cmore
August 15, 2000, 12:03 AM
dangus, it's doable, but why? it will be very similar to 6.5x55 swede, just shorter.or were you thinking of using a smaller case like 223 or 222 mag?look at rcbs list of custom dies, seems like this or something close is there.

Dangus
August 15, 2000, 01:28 AM
Well, I just think that size of round would be a great in-between of 5.56x45 and 7.62x51.
It would be more powerful than 5.56, but more controllable than 7.62. I just think it would be a very interesting experiment. I suppose I could just modify Swedish rounds with a shorter casing. Maybe the 55 length is good though. I'm not sure what the recoil energy is on it compared to the .308 or .223

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I twist the facts until they tell the truth. -Some intellectual sadist

The Bill of Rights is a document of brilliance, a document of wisdom, and it is the ultimate law, spoken or not, for the very concept of a society that holds liberty above the desire for ever greater power. -Me

George Stringer
August 15, 2000, 07:57 AM
Dangus, a good reloading manual will have information on case forming. Reloader's Digest and the like should have a lot of articles on making jacketed bullets. George

Mike Irwin
August 15, 2000, 02:51 PM
Dangus,

6.5x50 has already been done: the Japanese Arisaka military round.

I've always thought that this round would be spectacular for a light, handy deer rifle for kids or the recoil shy.

As for forming cases, there are two books that I recommend: George Nonte's Cartridge Conversions, and John Donnley's (sorry, can't remember the name).

Both talk about custom forming brass from existing brass. Nonte's is more nuts & bolts (and is, unfortunatly, out of print), while Donnley's is more specific conversions.



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Beware the man with the S&W .357 Mag.
Chances are he knows how to use it.

griz
August 15, 2000, 04:35 PM
If you are looking for a case for a standard size bolt face the 250 or 300 savage is about 50 mm long. To get the same, or better, performance out of a factory case the new 260 Rem should be 51 mm since it is a necked down version of the 308. BTW, more power to ya if you're looking for something just a little out of the ordinary.

Dangus
August 15, 2000, 11:32 PM
Thanks for the info thus far :)

I just love tinkering with things. I get all sorts of wild ideas and must try them all or I brood about it for years. 6.5x50 is one of those I've been thinking about for a while. I didn't realize it'd already been done, but I'll look into that.

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I twist the facts until they tell the truth. -Some intellectual sadist

The Bill of Rights is a document of brilliance, a document of wisdom, and it is the ultimate law, spoken or not, for the very concept of a society that holds liberty above the desire for ever greater power. -Me

JimWolford
August 16, 2000, 09:40 PM
Dangus:

Check old loading manuals, and factory ammo data for the 6.5 X 54 Mannlicher-Schonauer cartrige, the old original cartrige for that rifle.

This will give you a good idea of what you could expect to get from a case of that size.

If you want to really get involved in some deep thinking here is a item that will help.

It is a computer program called "Load From a Disk" ( I think ) and it lets you choose the cartrige case you want and the caliber you would neck it to- after choosing those and specifying a barrel length it will give you powder charges and velocity/pressure obtainable for each combination.

This program operates much like the old "Powley Computer" from back in the 50's that some of us remember.

You can calculate expected preformance of any wildcat cartrige you can dream of, which is a good way of killing many hours at the keyboard <VBG>

Jim

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Lay up some blackpowder and flints
The rest we can build, if need be