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Skorzeny
August 9, 2000, 04:16 PM
In a 1911 design, what is the most frequence cause of a failure to feed when the cartridge gets stuck nose-up, half-way into the chamber?

Also, what is this condition called?

Skorzeny

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For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Sun Tzu

Ledbetter
August 9, 2000, 04:25 PM
Amateur guess: Failure to go completely into battery due to recoil spring wearing out.

Ledbetter

beemerb
August 9, 2000, 05:36 PM
Does it do it with all mags?Could be a mag problem.Reloads?Not enough crimp and sharp edge catching.Needs a ramp polish?
Too short on info to make a good guess.The ones I named would be comon.

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Bob--- Age and deceit will overcome youth and speed.
I'm old and deceitful.

George Stringer
August 10, 2000, 06:52 AM
Skorzeny, failures as you describe are normally caused by a excessively dirty chamber or a piece of shell casing stuck in the chamber. When the 1911 gets the cartridge halfway in it will go the rest of the way unless something in the chamber itself stops it. George


[This message has been edited by George Stringer (edited August 10, 2000).]

Skorzeny
August 10, 2000, 09:27 AM
Well, it happened repeatedly when I was hand cycling (by "slinging" the slide) my 1911 with a fully loaded 8-round magazine with Federal 185 grain Hi-Shok JHP cartridge.

It never occurred with:

1. Ball ammmo.
2. 7-round magazines.
3. When I used the slide stop to release the slide.
4. When the slide worked off the recoil.

My guess is that I was unwittingly riding the slide with my fingers and not letting the slide freely release with an ooomph necessary to feed JHP from an 8-round magazine, but I wanted to make sure by asking the knowledgeable folks here.

Thank you.

Skorzeny

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For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Sun Tzu

Skorzeny
August 10, 2000, 09:28 AM
One more thing:

What is the advantages and disadvantage of using a 18.5 lbs. recoil spring in a 1911 as opposed to the standard weight spring?

Skorzeny

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For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Sun Tzu

M1911
August 11, 2000, 08:32 AM
A lighter recoil spring will increase the speed of the slide under recoil. This may cause extra wear on the frame if you are using full power loads. It will also give the slide a bit less oomph when chambering rounds, thus possibly increasing the chance for failures to feed.

If you're using full power loads in a 5" M1911, I'd stick with a 20 lb spring.

Jared

James K
August 11, 2000, 02:34 PM
But (there is always a "but") a stronger recoil spring will put more strain on the slide stop pin and from there to the frame. With good parts and a steel frame, this is seldom a problem, but it can't be ignored completely either. Some folks forget that it is the slide stop pin that brings the whole barrel-slide mass to a screeching halt when it runs back into battery.

In other words, there ain't no such thing as a free lunch.

Jim

[This message has been edited by Jim Keenan (edited August 11, 2000).]