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View Full Version : How to get Beretta Locking Block off the Barrel?


wolf 1415
July 11, 2000, 11:54 AM
Can anyone help me get the locking block out of a Beretta 92 Barrel? All three that I own have the locking block in pretty tight. Is there a trick to getting them out? I just got an aftermarket barrel, but I want to use the factory locking block. Thanks in advance.

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"If cowardly and dishonorable men sometimes shoot unarmed men with Army pistols or guns, the evil must be prevented by the penitentiary and gallows, and not by a general deprivation of constitutional privilege." Wilson vs. State, Ark. 1878

Andrewh
July 11, 2000, 01:11 PM
Press it in so it is flush with the barrel, hold it in, tilt the barrel so it points straight up, and slide it out sideways.

Slartibardfast
July 11, 2000, 05:45 PM
The locking block was very tight on my new 92FS. Although I could see that it would simply slide off of the barrel, it was so tight that it would not. After 1000 rounds or so, just turning the barrel over will cause it to fall out. In conjunction with the previous post, you may want to put oil around where it meets the barrel to give it some lubrication. On my gun, I found that there is a “magic angle” at which it will come out more easily. Just keep working at it, (I would think you shouldn’t have to force it), and you’ll get it off.

George Hill
July 11, 2000, 06:23 PM
Sending this to Gunsmithing.

George Stringer
July 12, 2000, 06:45 AM
Wolf, drift out the roll pin in the rear underlug of the barrel. This will release the locking block plunger. Remove it to the rear. Then you can take out the locking block to either side. George

wolf 1415
July 12, 2000, 09:33 AM
George, thanks for the reply, but could you please explain "drifing out." I am new to the term and the procedure. Thanks again.

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"If cowardly and dishonorable men sometimes shoot unarmed men with Army pistols or guns, the evil must be prevented by the penitentiary and gallows, and not by a general deprivation of constitutional privilege." Wilson vs. State, Ark. 1878

George Stringer
July 12, 2000, 10:54 AM
Wolf, drifting (and I've never understood why it's called that) is driving out the pin with a punch and hammer. George