PDA

View Full Version : Brownells teflon/moly gun finish


stinx
September 22, 1999, 05:45 PM
Has any onr ever used this to refinsih a firearm? You are supposed to be able to just spray it on ,then bake it in the oven. Brownells claims its avery durable finish. Has anyone ever used this product?

George Stringer
September 22, 1999, 10:18 PM
Stinx, I use it often. Teflon is the most asked for finish that I offer these days. It's less expensive than anything else, rustproof, and very durable. There are two "tricks" to getting a good finish with the Brownells product. First, degrease with Brownells TCE. Second, heat the parts to about 100deg before applying. The heat causes the spray to dry on contact and it doesn't have the chance to run. George

Jim V
September 22, 1999, 10:21 PM
I have used it, I bead blasted the slide and frame of a 1911 first. A good durable finish.

------------------
Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
"If there be treachery, let there be jehad!"

Badger
September 23, 1999, 07:11 AM
There was an article in one of the gun magazines about this finish recently.Doesn't seem to be to difficult to apply. George, how far do you have to disassemble a revolver other than removing the cylinder. If the finish isn't pitted, can you get get good results without sandblasting? I don't know where I would go to have someone do this but if the finish is just worn I was wondering if you could get satisfacory results without sandblasting.Thanks.

George Hill
September 23, 1999, 07:48 AM
Hmmm... This sounds like a better solutiion than the simple spray on moly coat I use on my AR bolt carrier...
This stuff wont come off onto your hands I bet... The only drawback I have with what I'm using is that it's messy to handle.

------------------
"There is no limit to stupidity. Space itself is said to be bounded by its own curvature, but stupidity continues beyond infinity."
RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
The Critic formerly known as Kodiac

Jim V
September 23, 1999, 07:27 PM
You can get a good finish w/o bead or sand blasting what you are putting the stuff on. I bead blasted the 1911 because I wanted a little different finish. I also think the finish has a better "grip" on the roughened surface.

------------------
Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
"If there be treachery, let there be jehad!"

George Stringer
September 23, 1999, 10:21 PM
You can apply it without polishing or beadblasting right over the old blue. There may be something to what Jim said about the rougher finish but I haven't seen evidence of it or experimented to find out. One thing about the finish is that the longer it's on the tougher it gets. My son has a shotgun we did about 2 years ago and I think it would take a nail and effort to scratch it. George

Badger
September 24, 1999, 06:41 PM
Okay so what I'm understanding is that if the finish is not rough you can go right over the old blueing. But what about disassembly. The pictures I saw in the magazine article showed the hammer and trigger removed from the frame. I've never done that so if that's necessary, how difficult a job is it? Is it possible to apply the finish without removing anything but the cylinder. thanks.

Badger
September 24, 1999, 06:43 PM
Okay so what I'm understanding is that if
the finish is not rough you can go right
over the old blueing. But what about
disassembly. The pictures I saw in the
magazine article showed the hammer and
trigger removed from the frame. I've
never done that so if that's necessary,
how difficult a job is it? Is it possible
to apply the finish without removing
anything but the cylinder. thanks.

Badger
September 24, 1999, 06:43 PM
Okay so what I'm understanding is that if
the finish is not rough you can go right
over the old blueing. But what about
disassembly. The pictures I saw in the
magazine article showed the hammer and
trigger removed from the frame. I've
never done that so if that's necessary,
how difficult a job is it? Is it possible
to apply the finish without removing
anything but the cylinder. thanks.

Jim V
September 24, 1999, 11:34 PM
Check the November 1999 issue of HANDGUNS magazine, there is an article starting on page 10 by Dan Johnson that explains the steps needed to use the finish. The column is entitled "SHOOTER'S BOX"

The article name is "BROWNELL'S 'DO IT YOURSELF' TEFLON/MOLY GUN FINISH"

As to only removing the cylinder of a revolver before using the finish, I really don't think that it would work very well. I sure would not want to bake my springs in an over even for a little while at 350 degrees. If you know a nice friendly gun smith, have him dismantle the revolver if you don't know how, use the finish and have him reassemble it. I don't know what he would charge but it would be worth it if you did not ruin any springs.


------------------
Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
"If there be treachery, let there be jehad!"



[This message has been edited by Jim V (edited September 25, 1999).]

George Stringer
September 25, 1999, 06:09 AM
Badger, I apologize for not answering this completely. You need to completely disassemble as Jim pointed out. If you feel comfortable doing this yourself but just don't have the instructions, e-mail me with the make and model and I'll send you the step-by-step. One other thing about Teflon especially on a revolver. The finish should be allowed to cure 10-15 days after applying before use. Also and I don't know why this is, I seem to get better results baking at 300 degrees for 30 minutes rather than 20 minutes at 350. George

pojim
May 24, 2000, 07:33 PM
I'm thinking of doing the slide only on a couple of autos. Sig blue and HK HE finish are the intended victims. I suppose I should knock out the roll pins and remove the firing pin assemblies. Is it safe to tape over night sights and can the tritium tubes take the 300F? Thanks for the help!

pojim

houndawg
May 24, 2000, 10:03 PM
OK, so you degrease the part and spray on the stuff, toss the part on a cookie sheet, and put it in the oven. Does the part touching the foil on the cookie sheet get messed up? That's the first thing I thought of when I saw the stuff in the catalog. Any finish will flow as it cures, and contact with the cookie sheet will impede the flow. Somebody set me straight, please.

shooter63
May 24, 2000, 10:55 PM
houndawg
Yes contact with a cookie sheet will mess up the finish. For what it is worth I use either fine wires or a dowel rod contacting a internal or unseen to area of the part to suspend it during the spraying and baking to prevent contact with anything. I made a rack to place in the oven out of coathangers to hang the parts while baking. Do a "dry run" of painting and baking the parts to figure out the best wa before you start. Practice with anything ( tools, junk parts, anything metal )to get the feel of how heavy a coat to put on. Good luck, I think you will find it easy

Northwest Cajun
May 24, 2000, 11:03 PM
Hi guys,
I watched/ helped the gunsmith "paint" my 03 Springfield. He heated the all the parts first then sprayed 2 coats. For the small parts like the triggerguard and back half of the bolt. He then hung them from the oven rack with a coat hanger wire the barrel was put in his (dry) blueing tank that was set to 350( I think).
It came out great and I havent had a problem with it yet. The best thing about this stuff is the eggs don't stick when you get hungry after a long day at the range ;-
Cajun)

------------------
Laizzes Les Bon Temps Rouler

RickG30
June 3, 2000, 08:11 PM
I used it on a Mossberg Mariner and only degreased it. The nickel finish is rough and the teflon/moly is on good. The Mariner
is very rust resistent but I wanted a dark finish and the dry lube qualities. I sprayed some into the barrel and after 50 rounds of buckshot, most of the finish was still on.
Rick