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ChrisMkIV
May 22, 2000, 05:54 AM
Does having soft rubber grips have any advantages over hard grips?

I would think that soft grips would conform better to your hand and provide a softer recoil, but a hard grip with grooves molded in it would also provide the same grip, would it not?

Would the recoil trade off be worth it?

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"The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword, becuse the whole body of the people are armed"
Noah Webster
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Gunslinger
May 22, 2000, 09:59 AM
I can find no significant advantage offered by rubber grips in reducing recoil. Frankly it would not be worth it to me to have to look at the rubber grips, which I think are ugly. But that is a matter of personal taste, which in the end is what really determines what grips an individual chooses. I prefer wooden finger grooves but like starting with non finger grooved grips and adding my own grooves where I want them. I'd recommend you use what you best like and not be concerned with what others think. ;)

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Gunslinger

TFL End of Summer Meet (http://www.thefiringline.com:8080/forums/showthread.php?threadid=46114), August 12th & 13th, 2000

Ledbetter
May 22, 2000, 01:53 PM
I have Hogue wraparound rubber grips on my stainless Ruger MkII and my CZ-75. They work for me and I think they look good too, for what it's worth. I believe the finger grooves help in reducing muzzle flip and faster reaquisition of the target after each shot.

Noban
May 22, 2000, 06:08 PM
I have rubber grips on my Sig 226 and have decided they are not for me. The 226 has a large diameter grip to begin with and the rubber grips are thicker and detract from the original feel of the pistol.

I have checkered rosewood grips on my 1911 which don't add any benefit for me other than appearance. But sometimes, that's enough....

Jim V
May 22, 2000, 06:48 PM
Rubber grips on the M-66 (that I've had since '74). Ivory, stag or checkered walnut on the various 1911's.

As to any advantage, there is none on semiautos as far as I can tell. They sure were "grabby" when I tried to conceal the 1911 under a shirt. They seemed to catch the shirt and prevent it from moving as smoothly as the other materials do. Disavantage for rubber. The 66 was my duty revolver for a number of years and I was not trying to hide it so there was no problem. One thing though, I "erased" the edges off the grips sliding in and out of patrol cars.

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Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
"If there be treachery, let there be jehad!"

[This message has been edited by Jim V (edited May 22, 2000).]

ChrisMkIV
May 22, 2000, 08:21 PM
I guess it all breaks down to comfort, personal style, and just see what works best for me, or anyone for that matter.



------------------
"The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword, becuse the whole body of the people are armed"
Noah Webster

2nd Amendment lover? www.2ndamdlvr.homestead.com/home.html (http://www.2ndamdlvr.homestead.com/home.html)

Art Eatman
May 23, 2000, 08:37 AM
Water is indeed a lubricant for rubber, so if your hands tend to sweat, you could have a problem.

I had no trouble with Pachmyr "Combat" grips on my 1911 in IPSC. These are fairly thin, and lack the silly swell on the left side.

On 1911s in general, I prefer checkered wood grips to the military. A better "bite", on a gun with little rotational movement in recoil.

I've had no problem with the original grips on Ruger Super Blackhawks, but the rubber grips on the Taurus Raging Bull work well. It might be shape, more than material.

Jim V's comment about "grabby" is something to consider.

And we're back to "personal thing".

Regards, Art

Ledbetter
May 23, 2000, 01:11 PM
In light of my post above, I should point out that I don't carry the guns I have the rubber grips on, and wouldn't put those grips on a concealed carry gun, because of the "grabbiness" factor.

[This message has been edited by Ledbetter (edited May 23, 2000).]

ChrisMkIV
May 23, 2000, 09:35 PM
So you are saying that soft rubber grips will
"stick" or "catch" on clothing during carry under clothing? I would have not even thought that could be a factor in selection.

But when your hands sweat, would it not make some wood grips slippery?

------------------
"The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword, becuse the whole body of the people are armed"
Noah Webster

www.2ndamdlvr.homestead.com/home.html (http://www.2ndamdlvr.homestead.com/home.html)

Ledbetter
May 24, 2000, 01:02 PM
ChrisMkIV,

They catch on light fabrics like shirts and jacket liners and the insides of pockets. Like rubbing a pencil eraser against your t-shirt, compared to rubbing the wood of the pencil. For me, rubber grips work great for target or IDPA shooting because of the precision with which you can duplicate your grip on the gun before and after each shot.

For a small carry gun, I don't think you can beat checkered wood in a dark color, with or without finger "channels."

[This message has been edited by Ledbetter (edited May 24, 2000).]

ChrisMkIV
May 24, 2000, 07:01 PM
I guess thats why having grips that slide on and off are good.

------------------
"The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword, becuse the whole body of the people are armed"
Noah Webster

Second Amendment lover? www.2ndamdlvr.homestead.com/home.html (http://www.2ndamdlvr.homestead.com/home.html)