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Wingbone
January 27, 2006, 05:18 PM
I was thinking of hunting a ram. Maybe Corsican or something like that. It will be a "canned" hunt but thats all can handle right now.(By canned I mean 300+ acres looking for 1 animal) The taxidermist I brought my deer to this year said he hunted rams in alaska and they tasted better than any venison he ever tried. I dont know what kind of ram it was though so any thoughts or opinions? Im not crazy about killing an animal just for the head, so has anyone tried them? Thanks,
Ken

fisherman66
January 27, 2006, 06:47 PM
Their oyster's are delicious.:eek:

You said "That's all I can handle right now." Are you talking about money wise? I always assumed that those "ranch" hunts are way more expensive than free range.

I've had audad, and it was not as tasty as venison; but it was an old ram that could bearly look side to side. Actually it tasted aweful. I also have a hard time recommending Nelgi. Yuk....it was a rutty bull though.

If you want good eating with a beautiful mount....Axis Deer & Fallow Deer.

Smokey Joe
January 28, 2006, 02:49 AM
Was on my first canned hunt myself last summer--it may well be my last; I really had no idea what I was getting into.

However, I killed (can't say hunted) a Corsican ram, and let me tell you it was DEEE-licious. If you like lamb. If you don't like that special "mutton" flavor then it will not be for you.

Liver is liver, but even this Corsican's liver had just a dash of the mutton flavor. That was all right, though; My wife & I happen to LOVE liver and bacon and onions. The secret is not to over-fry the liver. Fry it only until it isn't pink in the middle any more, not one second longer. (You keep making cuts in the piece of liver as you fry, to find that out.) We made absolute pigs of ourselves on it.

Since, we've had the rest of the ram stewed, roasted, and on the Weber, and it has all been tasty and good. I don't think there is any more of it in the freezer.

If yr taxidermist hunted wild rams in AK, they were almost certainly Dall sheep. They are beautiful, and take a mountain climber who can also shoot, to hunt successfully, I'm told. I would expect them to taste muttony, like any sheep, and to me that would be a plus, not a minus. (My own experience with Dall sheep is limited to shooting them with a camera, in Denali Nat. Pk. And even that required mountain climbing!)