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View Full Version : Feral hogs with rimfires and B.B. shot.


FirstFreedom
January 23, 2006, 10:53 AM
OK, here's the deal. There's some public hunting land with hogs on it, but the WMA regs say you can only use archery, .22 rimfire (including 22 magnum), or shotgun with size BB or smaller (not larger) on the hogs, strangely enough. I guess the concern is safety - they don't want the bullets carrying far & wide. So would it be insane to go after them with a .22 magnum with headshots, or should just stick to archery? Don't think I'd even try a shotgun with little shot like that - that's just plain unethical it seems.

Death from Afar
January 23, 2006, 03:02 PM
Hmmmm.....mate, I recall we once saw a pig at the bottom end of our place, chomping on some lambs. The old man was furious, and having left his L1A1 at home recahed for the only rifle at hand, which was his bolt action .22. ( we did used to shoot a lot of pigs when I was a kid- about 50 a year without actually going out hunting) Bang! Pe..ow! Bang! Pe-ow!!! Both bullets- I kid you not, ricocheted off the porker! I think you would do slightly better with .22 magnum, but pigs have a lot of mud and stuff on them ,and a rimfire just wont do it I fear.

zeisloft
January 23, 2006, 03:11 PM
Would cutting your shotgun shells (3/4 of the way through)just infront of the wad so as to make a slug out of some bird shot be "legal". It works well out to 50ish yds. If not, arrows are fun, expecially if you can spot & stalk.
~z

kingudaroad
January 23, 2006, 03:50 PM
Make sure your off the ground when you hit em with that 22. Their gonna come lookin for ya:eek:

FirstFreedom
January 23, 2006, 03:51 PM
zeis, I'm not sure exactly how doing what you describe would keep the shot from spreading apart, but I think you're definitely onto something there. I could modify the shells in some way with a wad enclosed on both ends or some such containing the shot, that it acts like a slug but technically isn't, and that should still technically be legal. Or just bowhunt.

Death from afar - Dang, man! Bouncing off huh? Was that off the body or off the skull?

raktrak
January 23, 2006, 04:15 PM
We used to ring a shell with a pocket knife and shoot it at ducks at 75 yards on the pond. We would slip up the back side of the levee and we only had one shot in our single barrel . It works . The ducks were always in the shallow end on the pasture side so no getting closer possible.We would wait for them to bunch up and get 2 and some times 3. Old 2 3/4" paper hull shells.They kinda whistled as the went down the pond.:D :D


One other thought on the 22 is if you are close enough for a shot behind the ear it does fine . Up to about 25 yards.

Death from Afar
January 23, 2006, 04:30 PM
FF- I am not too sure to be honest. I was on the back of the truck hanging on for dear life! I suspect the skull. The bullets were ( if I recall) Kynoch lead hollow points, which were not ideal.( as an aside, you used to be given ammo by the local council so you could shoot rabbits and we always got this sort of ammo- seems bizarre now) I told the old man we should have taken out the L1A1 or his .45 LC winchester trapper as well. ( Now that gun was a pig killer)

If you really want to use shot, drop wax into the cartridge which holds the shot together longer. Fouls the barrel something awful mind you.

fisherman66
January 23, 2006, 04:54 PM
I cleaned and butchered a couple feral pigs (150-200 lbs) after Christmas. I was amazed at how thick and tough their hide is.

A solid tungsten 22 mag bullet earshot would be the only thing I would try of your listed options. I would want to be in a tree at the time I pulled out the slack. The sows are much better eating in my limited experience. Watch out for ticks (I bet I had thousands on my pigs.)

FirstFreedom
January 23, 2006, 05:03 PM
ok, who sells tungsten-bullet .22 mag ammo? And is there any way besides wax or 'ringing' the shell to make the shot stay together in a slug? And when you 'ring' a shotshell, I take it that the whole end of the hull itself flies out with the shot & wad?

fisherman66
January 23, 2006, 05:13 PM
I'm not aware of anyone who makes a tungsten bullet, but I have long contemplated making them from fishing weights (with lead sealing the hole for the fishing line). I need a lathe to put it into effect.

Art Eatman
January 23, 2006, 05:27 PM
FF, have you read these regs, yourself? I have a problem with believing that any wildlife regulatory agency wants wounded animals wandering off to die somewhere.

If you contact them and they say that's the way it's gotta be, ask them how they'll like the wonderful publicity they'll get? :)

Art

FirstFreedom
January 23, 2006, 09:44 PM
Art that's what I thought. The regs actually say "shotgun, no larger than BB". I therefore *thought* that surely must be a misprint; it means to say "no smaller than BB", right? So I call the game warden himself today that manages the areas in question - he says only .22 and .22 magnum, and shotgun, BB or smaller. No .17hmr either. Not sure why. Here it is in black and white.

http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/regs/huntregs10.htm

Look down to about the 9th paragraph, "shotshell size restrictions": "If hunting hogs with a shotgun, no person in the field may possess or attempt to harvest hogs using shot larger than conventional BB (.180 in. dia.)."

Combine this rule with a no centerfire rifle rule (for some reason), and that's what you end up with. Yes, they're dipsticks, it sounds like. Perhaps the rule is to keep deer poachers out who would just say "oh, I'm hunting hogs with this here ought six", then carry out the deer when the warden is not around. Either that or it's safety concerns vis a vis nearby lake camping areas. Or both. Probably more of the former, since you can shoot hogs during the deer primitive and deer gun seasons with the equipment appropriate for those seasons. The no-rifle rule only applies after deer season. And apparently (surely) you can use a rifle of any sort when on private lands - this is just public lands, and perhaps just *certain* public lands. Others may allow rifles - I dunno.

But yeah, I say they deserve to be ridiculed/chastised, because that is clearly an illogical & unethical rule. Have at 'em!

Long Path
January 23, 2006, 10:34 PM
Be damned:
Shotgun Pellet Size Restrictions
If hunting hogs with a shotgun, no person in the field may possess or attempt to harvest hogs using shot larger than conventional BB (.180 in. dia.).
They do it kind of different, up in Oklahoma... :rolleyes:

I'm thinking that this would be a good time for a Savage 12ga/.22WMRF combo gun, or one of those nifty Browning pump-action .22 WMRFs, or a 3.5" magnum semi-auto 12ga. All shots should be taken at under 20 yards, and all shots should be followed by 2nd, 3rd, 4th.... shots.

shureshot0471
January 23, 2006, 10:41 PM
.22's behind the ear can be effective and I have also used the double alt. buckshot with a head shot standing broad side it can also be effictive even a bowie knife can with a throat shot hehe :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Art Eatman
January 23, 2006, 11:25 PM
I've always been pretty proud of my ability to get up close and personal on critters in the woods. But with what I see as a handicap for a clean and ethical kill, this is one of those "Include me out!" deals. A little bad luck, a tiny bit off on the shot, and it's a wounded critter. No thank you.

Art

FirstFreedom
January 24, 2006, 01:53 AM
yep, we're morons. With that sage advice, I guess it's gonna be archery or not at all on the public lands.

Stiofan
January 24, 2006, 02:22 AM
From your link, I don't see a no centerfire rule. It specifically says take "hunters will be allowed to harvest feral hogs by whatever means legal during that season." I can't beleive they'd be worried about CF rounds on hogs, when they aren't worried about them on other legal game. Am I missing something?

youp
January 24, 2006, 07:26 AM
If you are any good with a bow, that would be my first choice. The second would be a 22 mag solid and a good rest. Put it between his eyes and run up and cut his throat, keeping an eye on suitable climbing trees. A hog cuts to the side so if you jump straight over it.....

A tungsten bullet would soon have your rifle a smooth bore. A 22 is far too small for a sabot to protect your barrel's lands.

Before I would use a cut shell I would check the game regs real close. They are frowned on in many places.

Wild Bill Bucks
January 24, 2006, 11:06 AM
I Live in Oklahoma,and these regs. are why I don't do much hunting on the game management areas.

SOLUTION: Get with local agriculture dept.(County agent) and find out if he knows private farmers or ranchers who are having hog problems.
Many land owners around the refuges hate the regs to because it creates a safe haven for the hogs, therefore making their hog problems worse.
If you have access to a county landowners map, it will give you the name of the land owners around the refuges, and how much property they own.

Be prepared to be turned down when you ask to hunt because they don't know you, but if you are persistant, you will find one or two of them that will let you hunt.
PLEASE be pleasent and civil to them when you call and don't get your feelings hurt because they won't let you hunt. They have all had those bad experiences with hunters who shoot their livestock and cut their fences.
Farming and ranching in Oklahoma is a hard business to make a living at, and they don't need any "hunter made" problems on top of an already hard exsistance.

I ask as many in person as I can because it lets you have the opportunity to be face to face with them and I think it gives you a better chance of hunting on them than by telephone.

When I do get the opportunity to hunt on them, I will try to find some small something I can do to help them ( like wiring a loose strand of wire that may be loose on their fence) and bringing it to their attention. That always leaves them with a good attitude toward you and your hunting and almost always results in a return hunting trip for me.

FirstFreedom
January 24, 2006, 12:44 PM
WBB, thanks again. I know we've been talking about this in another thread. Where exactly would I find a county agent for a local agriculture dept? I was also thinking of just going to an early morning coffee shop in some small towns and try to talk to the farmers/ranchers there, rather than trying to go farm to farm or use the telephone. I'd rather meet in person, and many farmers do tend to congregate at little coffee shops in town early in the morning.

As far as the no centerfire rule, I don't know where he gets that, but that's straight from the game warden, and those types of rules (no centerfire) are not statewide rules, such as I linked to, but imposed on an area-by-area basis an as additional restriction - they are specific to certain WMAs. But it's true that if there are no additional regs specific to a WMA, you could use a centerfire, since in theory, you can use a centerfire on a squirrel, and it is in fact squirrel season, so you'd be using a harvest tool appropriate for an existing season.

Wild Bill Bucks
January 24, 2006, 01:25 PM
FF,
Good thinking on the cafe, on the county guy, Here in Pittsburg County the guy is in the Court House in the OSU Extension Center. I think his name is Ted Evix. In your area, or out of this county, He might be listed as the County Farm Bureau, or County Agriculture Dept.
Oklahoma Dept. of Agriculture has a man in each county that would be the guy to talk to, but I don't know how to get to anyone at the state level who can give you their names. I'm looking in my phone book under Oklahoma state offices, and I don't see any numbers I can help you with.
Ted Evix is a really nice guy and might be able to tell you who to call if you can get him. try 918-423-4120

Sorry I can't be of more help.

Desertfox
January 29, 2006, 12:18 AM
I live in LeFlour County in mid east Ok and I did exactly that. I went to the local DQ for morning coffee a couple times. The problem with Oklahoma farmers is they all hunt and fish and do it better than me. They can shoot as well as any Kentucky windage expert.
The only guy I found agreeable to me, is letting me set a few hog traps on his grazing land and checking them 2 times a week. While checking them, he said I could check the area for hog movement and shoot as many as I can. Just don't shoot any cattle.

The traps got me onto the farm. Early morning hog hunts over tilled and planted pasture, surrounded by tree lines makes for some decent hog hunting.

I suggest you build a few hog traps (cattle safe) and get your foot in the door that way. They are easy and inexpensive to build. Check the web for designs. When I catch one hog there are usually 3 to 5 in the trap together.

I suggest you search for some ferrel hog recepies also. You will need them. Good luck.

armedtotheteeth
January 29, 2006, 11:49 AM
I made some pretty mean "hog Getters " out of old 45 brass filled with lead. I shot it out of a double charged 20 gauge shell. I just hade to try it, Not very accurate. Makes a devastating hole if you hit your target. I.E. neighbors dog eating my chickens. heheh oops.

FirstFreedom
February 1, 2006, 01:21 PM
I made some pretty mean "hog Getters " out of old 45 brass filled with lead. I shot it out of a double charged 20 gauge shell

Cool. Thanks guys - lotta interesting ideas.

Death from Afar, when I read your posts, I imagine you with the Steve Irwin accent talking - ha! Crik-ee!

whiskey
February 2, 2006, 09:45 PM
Use a .22 or a .22mag. Not the shotgun. You have to shoot them just behind the ear hole. Don't get too low or you will just hit the jaw and they will run off. Get too high and the bullet will miss the skull.

Don't shoot them in the forehead. I have seem .38 specials not make it in from the front.

I use .22mag solids and this usually causes such violent brain scrambling that blood shoots out the pigs nose like a garden hose. This will work for big or small pigs.

I am not going to defend using a .22 on hogs. I do it and it works. I have been doing it long enough to know that it works well if the shooter puts the bullet in the right spot. I also use a .44mag, it works too.

If you can only use rimfire or shotgun BB or less then use the .22. The shotgun is not enough. Oh and cutting the shells would probably get you in trouble. You may not find it in the hunting regs, but it is probably illegal if you read the state laws.

Bigoledude
February 7, 2006, 01:37 AM
Hey FF

Here, the restriction to BB shot and rimfire .22's is only when deer season is closed. During deer season you can shoot hogs with anything legal to take deer with.

I asked a game warden the same question you ask now. He told me the reason was that when confronted in the woods with centerfire rifles and with shotguns loaded with either buckshot or slugs the hunters always claimed to be hog hunting. However, the temptation to kill a deer when one crossed their path was more than some hunters could handle. Thus, the prohibition on deer-sized ammo when deer season is closed.

What's even more rediculous is that down here, deer browse is being destroyed by the huge numbers of wild hogs, to the point of affecting the deer numbers! I hear that in some states, hunting hogs at night is actually legal. Imagine that!

dgc940
February 8, 2006, 01:34 AM
Id use this right behind the ear! should penetrate well

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=110531

FirstFreedom
February 8, 2006, 10:52 AM
Here, the restriction to BB shot and rimfire .22's is only when deer season is closed. During deer season you can shoot hogs with anything legal to take deer with.

I know; exactly. Problem is, it's not deer season. In deer season I'm hunting deer. Now I'd like to hunt hogs.

I asked a game warden the same question you ask now. He told me the reason was that when confronted in the woods with centerfire rifles and with shotguns loaded with either buckshot or slugs the hunters always claimed to be hog hunting. However, the temptation to kill a deer when one crossed their path was more than some hunters could handle. Thus, the prohibition on deer-sized ammo when deer season is closed.

Yes, I know. That is precisely what I figured is the reason. Too many yahoos that would sneak poached deer out while the warden isn't looking. It's a shame, because the damage that hogs cause is going to be checked less if legal hunters are limited in their means of taking like this, and since the public lands are refuges for the hogs (they go out at night to the adjacent farmlands and tear them up, then retreat to the haven of public lands during the day).

What's even more rediculous is that down here, deer browse is being destroyed by the huge numbers of wild hogs, to the point of affecting the deer numbers! I hear that in some states, hunting hogs at night is actually legal. Imagine that!

Yes, in Texas, you can hunt them at night, with a light, however you want. Here, you can hunt them year-round, and can even hunt them at night on private lands. But since you can not use a light, unlike TX, it's rather difficult to hunt them at night, unless there's a bright full moon. At some point, as their populations grow and they become more of a menace, the wildlife dept will undoubtedly start to loosen up like TX, allowing for lights, night vision, and rifles on public lands.

But again, my bow will be the best bet, as I'm pretty decent with it, know that it's deadly medicine, and besides, bowhunting is a hoot.

TCman
February 8, 2006, 06:04 PM
I would use a 12ga 3in with bb. If you have a pump or auto that would be a lot of lead down range. Also try a turkey choke.

armedtotheteeth
February 8, 2006, 07:44 PM
Any one out here ever use a red lens to hunt hogs at night. let me let you in on a little secret. They are color blind, cant see red. I thin it is cheating, but it is fun.hehe

FirstFreedom
February 8, 2006, 11:21 PM
I would use a 12ga 3in with bb. If you have a pump or auto that would be a lot of lead down range. Also try a turkey choke.

That would work, but only for VERY short ranges - say out to 10 or maybe 15 yards at the very most, where the shot load is still acting like a slug. Say, over a feeder. But it's no good for general hunting - what if my only shot is 30, 40, or 50 yards - I'm SOL.

Realistically, I'm left with archery. I'm good to about 30 yards with my bow, maybe 35 if conditions are excellent. Or better yet, hunt on private lands only with my .45-70 or .308!

CobrayCommando
February 9, 2006, 12:35 AM
I have a solution! Use an American 180, if possible the quad mount version intended for use on a Cessna.

pipoman
February 9, 2006, 01:08 AM
My dad said they used to extend the range of their shotgun by reloading with the shot in nylon pantyhose.

loggerhead
February 11, 2006, 09:40 AM
Some of the Corps of Engineers land in Alabama has these rather stupid restrictions on weapons for hunting on their lands also. I think it was derived due to adjoining land owners wanting to minimize the hunting activity on the corps land as it is open to the public.
A 22LR between the eyes would be my favorite shot with behind the ear second. When shooting between the eyes one has to be careful as to how the hog is looking at you. IF he is looking down his nose, don;t shoot, the bullet will hit him in the nose and not kill him(be ready to go up the nearest tree). Wait until he drops his nose and then shoot. A broad side shot with buck shot at a reasonable range (-60yds) will do him in also. A BB shot is .17 caliber, I think (could be wrong), and a broad side shot at -30 yards should do the job.
A boar has a "shield" that runs from his neck to near the end of his rib cage. This shield is natures way of preventing them from fataly injuring each other while fighting. The older the boar the thicker the shield. I have seen old +250 lb boars with shields as thick as one inch. If you feel the shield with your hand it feels like a thick piece of fiber glass under the skin. Actually, it is more of a gristle type of material because you can cut it with a knife and most bullets and a straight on broad head will penetrate it.

MeekAndMild
February 11, 2006, 10:13 AM
I've seen several hogs killed with a .22 but they were all smallish ones, never more than a couple of hundred pounds.

Desertfox
February 11, 2006, 12:19 PM
Use the bow. I use mine and it is a hoot. I prefer 145 gr. dangerous muzzy's for the broadhead selection. Hog Killers for sure. Right behind the shoulder and center mass. Quartering away hopefully. That boiler room is a little higher on a hog than it is on a deer. Razor sharp broadheads only or you will regret it.
Don't try those expandable broadhead crappers on hogs. You want penetration and cutting.
Check out the dangerous muzzy's 145 grain. www.gomuzzy.com
I have arrowed hogs with my recurve and my compound. Fun either way. They run a bit but they die fine. A good shot will drop an average hot in 50 yards. A less than good shot will drop a hog in..... a mile or so.
Wait for the quartering away shot and place it well. 150 pound hog or less, put him on the smoker. Bigger, pass on it, unless you are after a trophy or just want them gone.

loggerhead
February 11, 2006, 02:32 PM
In my experience a "big" wild hog is usually between 200 and 250 pounds, bigger is the exception. Killed one on my place several years ago that weighed 360# with one shot, .222 rem 50 gr ptsp and 80 yards.