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View Full Version : boar hunting - will this do?


dmented692006
January 21, 2006, 01:48 PM
im planning on goin down to florida at the end of Feb to go boar hunting. i just bought a marlin 45-70 lever action to take with me. the bullets the guy at the gun shop sold me are 300 grain winchester super x cxp2. i read the back of the box and it said they are made for thin skinned and light muscle animals. the guy says they will kill a boar but i dont know. what im tryin to ask is, will that bullet kill a 400 pound boar easily or do i need a bigger bullet?

Art Eatman
January 21, 2006, 02:01 PM
The odds are they'll work, but it sounds like they're more intended for such as deer, and have a rather thin jacket to allow expansion. That doesn't mean the lead core won't go through a hog, though.

If you want "insurance", find a load with a bit heavier jacket. Some of the .45-70 aficianados can give you better specific info than I can.

For your purposes, a .45 is a .30 that's already expanded. You have plenty enough gun.

Art

mete
January 21, 2006, 02:36 PM
The Winchester Partition 300 gr will do the job. I'm much happier with these than the other 300 gr bullets.

Long Path
January 21, 2006, 02:46 PM
400 or 405 grain bullet loads are better for hog. The 300 grain loads are a modern deer hunter's load, to reduce recoil and flatten trajectory. The 300g loads are more lightly-constructed to expand on deer.

If the 300g loads were all you had and you had no chance to improve upon them, I wouldn't wave off a man from hunting hog with them. But since you're outfitting yourself with a task-specific rifle (great choice) and loads in advance of hunting, why not get the more optimal loads? I'm not saying that you need to go buy some $50/box loads of Buffalo Bore or Garrett cartridges-- I'm just saying that you'll get better penetration with the 400 or 405 grain loads.

Don't forget to sight-in, and practice from field positions!

Do you have a good receiver peep sight installed yet? If not, may I suggest the XS (formerly Ashley Outdoors) peep sight? The thing is bulletproof, mounts on the extant rear scope mount holes, and improves accuracy quite a bit without compromising speed.

Good luck.

Rich Lucibella
January 21, 2006, 02:50 PM
They may not be the uber-tactical best for hog, but I think they'll do just fine. The caliber and action you chose is ideal...good show!

Once you decide you truly love that 45-70, you'll probably want to buy or load a couple hundred rounds to avoid having to rezero every time someone sells you a different brand/lot. If buying, I HIGHLY recommend the Buffalo Bore 405 grain JFN. http://www.buffalobore.com

Oh, and replace the Marlin butt pad with a Pachmeyr Decellerator. Trust me on this with the 45-70; it'll make a world of difference in your enjoyment.
Rich

Long Path
January 21, 2006, 03:15 PM
Oh, and replace the Marlin butt pad with a Pachmeyr Decellerator. Trust me on this with the 45-70; it'll make a world of difference in your enjoyment.
Rich
Rich, do you find that Decellerator pad to be substantually better than the ventilated buttpad on the 1895GS? It does a pretty good job on its own: http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=17032&stc=1&d=1137874454
But you've got a lot more experience with outfitting different .45-70's than I do...

dmented692006
January 21, 2006, 06:06 PM
thank you for the quick replies. i bought the gun used and it came with a peep sight and i think it has an aftermarket recoil pad. what are some good brands of ammo you would recommend? i know buffalo bore and garret but what about the ammo on cabelas...pmc, ten x cowboy ammo, magtech,GOEX, or ultramax. ive never heard of any of them and they are all pretty cheap so im weary. thanks for all the help.

Long Path
January 22, 2006, 12:17 PM
Actually, I'm fairly impressed with most Magtech ammo as a good value, for pistol practice ammo. That said, you've got a new rifle. You're going on a hog hunt. Spring for some decent ammo. (No, I didn't say Mega Premium! :) )

There are no flies on the good ol' Remington Express green box 45-70 Govt R4570G 405grain SP ammo. (And if you get into reloading, they sell the bullets.)

sirlonewolf
January 23, 2006, 10:14 PM
Hi dmented692006 ...........you mentioned going to Florida for the hog hunt. Are you using one of the many outfitters here or going to wild or private land? I live in Florida. And hog hunting is a favorite of mine. I have been twice in the last two weeks. Both times I took nice hogs with my Python .357 magnum using standard 158 grain JHP. I have one several occasions taken hogs with one shot from my bow. Unless you are going to one of the pro outfitters here your four hundred pound hog although not beyond the realm of imagination is still unlikely. Most will be in the neighborhood of 150 to 250 lbs. Your 45-70 will more than suffice.

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=17094&stc=1&d=1138079896

AussieHunter
January 24, 2006, 07:28 AM
I use a Marlin 45-70 for pigs and buffalo here in Oz. the .45-70 works great although is a bit under powered for buff, I use 400gr projies in loads i make up myself.

Well worth it a great little rifle.

I also use a .416Rigby on pigs which sorts them out better at longer ranges

dmented692006
January 26, 2006, 06:30 PM
my brother and i are going to use an outfitter my uncle recommended, its called out west farms i think.

Rich Lucibella
January 26, 2006, 06:39 PM
Rich, do you find that Decellerator pad to be substantually better than the ventilated buttpad on the 1895GS? It does a pretty good job on its own:
See this here, Matt? Now you have me questioning my own internal myths. I cannot honestly answer your question as to the Marlin 45-70 from personal knowledge....mine was built up with a Decelerator from jump.

However, long guns that HAVE stung me, whether the light .338 Blaser or certain O/U 12 gages, have benefited greatly from the Pachmayr....so has the NEC single shot 45-70. I've been trying to test out a LimbSaver but can't get the Texan to put one on.

So, the long and short of it is: if YOU say the stock pad is fine on the Marlin, I'll go with that.....course, I don't shoot that, there MaggyTech ammo! :D
Rich

whiskey
January 27, 2006, 02:04 PM
Sirlonewolf, haven’t you read on the forums that the .357mag is not enough gun for a hog? You MUST have at least a .44mag at a minimum.

I am kidding of course. I have seen many hogs killed D.R.T. with a .357mag. I happen to carry a .44mag cause that what my favorite gun happens to be chambered in.

The 45/70 with just about any bullet will do wonderful.

Long Path
January 27, 2006, 04:01 PM
So, the long and short of it is: if YOU say the stock pad is fine on the Marlin, I'll go with that.....course, I don't shoot that, there MaggyTech ammo! Well, I was pretty impressed with the one that came on JG's Guide Gun, but I don't know what Marlin puts on their other 1895s.
As I said (and as I know you read, good sir), I'm impressed with the "Maggie Tech" pistol ammo for practice, but would suggest going a little higher quality for actual hunting. :)

Can't get the big crewcut knuckle-dragger to outfit your pig-thumpers (like your .50 AE) with a LimbSaver? Probably just as well-- if you made your rifles even easier to shoot, you'd get even less ammo back! :D

Pointer
January 27, 2006, 05:13 PM
I have to say no...

A thin jacket bullet will tend to disintegrate when it hits tough hide ot bone or sinew and therefore fail in penetration. (I've heard of this happening on bears.)

If you have a partition or a premium bullet which is well-known for weight-retention, then it might work out OK.

In any case it would be borderline... and borderline "don't get it". ;)

Wingbone
January 27, 2006, 05:23 PM
I took a 250 pounder with my bow with 125 grain muzzy broadheads.