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Dust_Devil
January 7, 2006, 07:04 PM
An article in the Feb issue of SWAT on picture frame gun cabinets had me thinking that all my firearms locked up in one safe in one room is not the best idea tactically if I'm in another room if I threat bursts through my front door.

I don't live in a huge house where if I heard a noise of someone wanting to get in, I could run to another room and prepare myself and weapons. I live in a small condo where if someone feels he wants to break in while I'm in one room sleeping, in the bathroom taking a shower, in the kitchen cooking dinner or right by the front door in the living room watching TV that there isn't much time for me to react once the threat enters or to prevent that threat from entering.
While I am at home, I don't carry my weapon on me nor do I lay a rifle against my couch or a handgun on top of my coffee table.
However, since I live alone and don't have anybody such as children to worry about finding any of my firearms, this gives me a some options of not locking up all my firearms in one safe and place a couple in strategic places where whatever part of my condo I am in, I'll have a fast and quick access to a weapon without having to run to a certain room to unlock my gun safe before the threat gets to me first.
Ideas like having something that looks nothing more then just a regular picture frame actually holding a weapon for me ready to use or mounting a gun holster or shelf under a table or anyplace out of sight to visitors which will secretly hold a weapon for me to use in case of an emergency is something I should seriously consider.

Doug.38PR
January 7, 2006, 07:28 PM
I model my house after the Jovito ruins in the beginning of Raiders of the Lost Ark :D Spikes jabbing out of the walls, darts shooting out from the fire place, a neverending pit in the hall that I jump over every night, tarantulas hanging just inside the front door, and in case anything gets stolen, the whole house starts to come down around the bad guy once anything is removed from place and there is even a big boulder to seal off the front of the house :cool:

On a more serious note here are some thoughts: Ducktape a medium sized handgun under a chairside table in each room. Put a shotgun hanging over the fireplace (ready to pump). Gun in bedside table drawer or even better a shoulder holster hanging from the head of the bed next to you in between the bed and the bedside table. Maybe a shotgun latched to the underside of the bed so you can just reach under the bed and pull it out. duck tape a gun just under the kitchen sink.

HGKosteck
January 7, 2006, 07:41 PM
Keep a handgun on your hip.

Keep it hot.

At night, a longarm loaded and hot by the bedside.

Easy.

Zen900
January 7, 2006, 07:56 PM
However, since I live alone and don't have anybody such as children to worry about finding any of my firearms, this gives me a some options of not locking up all my firearms in one safe and place a couple in strategic places where whatever part of my condo I am in,

I live alone too and I never keep a loaded gun in my house. I even frown on loading even a single round in a gun at home. If an accidental discharge occurs in a condo it could strike a next door neighbor. Never drop your guard to safety even if youre the only one home. Keep the same rules at home you use at the range. Keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. It's never a good idea to keep loaded guns around. I gave up trying to keep a loaded gun in the house for protection. I keep a loaded mag near the gun but I never load it in the house. Too darn dangerous. Few people need to have multiple gun locations. One gun is plenty. I gave up on trying to plan for any event.

'75Scout
January 7, 2006, 08:26 PM
I keep my 870 with 7 rounds of Remington Reduced Recoil 00 Buck in the tube and 4 1oz slugs in a Mesa Tactical Shell holder. I don't keep a shell in the chamber, however I do keep the firing pin down so I can quickly rack one in if I need to.

Once I turn 21 and get my CHL I will carry my GLOCK 26, even in my home.

OneInTheChamber
January 7, 2006, 08:33 PM
Consider those fake pictures frames. They stick out from the wall about 1" extra and swing open to reveal a full size handgun.

Now that's art that is useful!

Chase

BigV
January 7, 2006, 09:12 PM
I keep my carry gun on me during all waking hours. I put it on in the morning and take it off when I go to bed. It then goes on the headboard within reach all the time while sleeping.

springmom
January 7, 2006, 09:43 PM
+1 BigV.

Springmom

Mikeyboy
January 7, 2006, 09:47 PM
I have said this a thousand times, you are more likely to have your house or apartment robbed when your not home. A robber will most likey find a loaded and hidden weapons, the question is what happens if someone comes home unexpected and suprises the robber. My take is if you have kids, the guns should be locked up, but with you single guys and gals, I don't see a problem with keeping a weapon around unlocked and loaded when your home, it just when you leave, if your not carrying it with you, you should lock it or at least unload it, and hide the ammo in a seperate spot from the weapon, I think if someone robs your house and finds your weapon and later find the ammo , he hopefully may not take the time to load it.

Keeping a gun out in the open and on the nightstand in a little concerning to me. I'm a light sleeper, but the night I get some deep sleep is the night I wake up with a BG pointing my gun at my forehead. That thought would keep me up at night, that is why I sleep better with a pistol in a digital lockbox, bolted under my bed.

Mikeyboy
January 7, 2006, 09:56 PM
Duct Tape is going to ruin your guns finish doug:D Get a few of these. You can even bolt them upside and velcro your holster to the lid. Set it to a two button push to open. Quicker then tryiny top peel off duct tape from your weapon.

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=4242360

shortround60
January 7, 2006, 10:04 PM
If the BG gets past the door chirp devices without us hearing and the 90+ lb american bulldog, I have two pistols within two steps of my bed, a mossy 500 within 3 steps and a handgun hidden near the rear of the house. My wife has instructions to get behind closed doors and don't open them until I calmly tell her to, regardless of anything she hears. If someone comes to that is not me, put two at waist height, call the police and watch out the window for their arrival.

pickpocket
January 7, 2006, 10:29 PM
I have one 1911 that will eject out of my ceiling fan when I push the secret button on the bedpost. That's good for 8 shots, then a quick duck and roll to the inside corner of the door and the shotgun comes out from behind the armoire... 7 shots gets me halfway up the hallway where I hit the secret lever 32" above the baseplate to open the sliding panel behind my family portrait. Out comes my M-4 with tac-light and reflex sight, and dual extended mags. That should be enough to get me to the front of the house where the SVD shoots up from a secret compartment in the floor and allows me to take the long-range shot as the BG's try to flee.

:)

Seriously, one or two is all you need. One in the nightstand (the one that should be on you until you go to bed), and one in a secure spot on the opposite side of the house.

Koz
January 7, 2006, 10:33 PM
I'd put them in reach of cover spots in your house: where you would dive to if someone busted open your door with a gun.

pickpocket
January 7, 2006, 10:43 PM
I'd put them in reach of cover spots in your house: where you would dive to if someone busted open your door with a gun

Man, I SO believe that if your lifestyle or mentality requires a plan to stash weapons at various locations in your house to prepare for the day that someone sends an entry team through your front door that you might have things going on in your life that no one on this forum can help with....LOL :p

miconoakisland
January 8, 2006, 12:12 AM
I have 2 alert (sometimes too alert) dogs, one that goes out to confront (a jet black Great Dane) and the other that provides close in support (the meaner, more agressive, more protective Golden Retriever). ADT has nothing on them!!

My XD40 is attached to my bedside table (my IWB holster is velcro wrapped around the leg below the height of the mattress), my small mag-light is on top of my bedside table, my pump shotgun (unracked) is hidden between the wall and headboard. All of which is on the far side of the bedroom door.

I live in a "very safe environment", (+/- 7k residents on an island with only one bridge on/off), but it's always a case of "it could never happen here" complacency that makes the news.

I leave, sometimes for a week or more, with my back door open (so my girls---dogs--can come and go as they need to in the fenced-in back yard). I get a girl (that used to live with me, so the girls/dogs know her well) to come in and feed them.

Living in a resort area, there are many vacant homes around, so if a BG is willing get by a large, bad-breathed Dane barking at head level, then get beyond to a bristling hurricane crotch-biter to get to anything I own, then they are welcome to it and I will be thankful I wasn't home when it occurred.

If a BG sets upon my home and manages to get beyond my dogs while I am home, then may God have mercy on my soul, because I may have to do what
I would really rather not, but would be forced, through no action of my own, to do.

I carry if I got my pants on and have a gun w/in arms reach if not. The only exception, now that I think of it, is when I'm in my bathroom/shower.

I don't have kids, keep my carry weapons (3) loaded w/ one in the chamber and my shotgun ready to pump. None are readily visible. I keep my other weapons empty and locked, with ammo and magazines separated also locked.

On the island we have DUI's, property theft, break-ins, domestic disputes, speeding and fender-benders. In the almost 10 years I've lived here, full-time, an LEO has been shot with a BB gun causing a bruise.

Being ready when in "safe" areas makes me even more ready when in other, sketchier areas. I never needed a gun, hope I never do, but I know I'll have one if I need one.

Tim Burke
January 8, 2006, 08:01 AM
Man, I SO believe that if your lifestyle or mentality requires a plan to stash weapons at various locations in your house to prepare for the day that someone sends an entry team through your front door that you might have things going on in your life that no one on this forum can help with.
From AP: (http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2006/jan/08/010802735.html)Two men arrested Saturday in the killing of a Richmond family are also suspected of slitting the throats of a musician, his wife and their two young daughters six days earlier, police said.
All seven victims were found bound with tape in their homes, authorities said.The Saturday referenced in the article was the same day that pickpocket posted. It isn't a question of your lifestyle, it's a function of what's going on in the world.
You don't get to make an appointment for your emergency, so you had better plan in advance. Everybody is planning; those that seem to be failing to plan are just planning to fail.

Easy E
January 8, 2006, 08:40 AM
I don't understand that "nothing bad will happen to me" mentality. Even among our own ranks in this and other forums, I read "you're paranoid" or "you're looking for a fight" far too often. The worst ones though are the people spouting off "Don't fight back. You'll just make it worse". Pathetic, defeatist thinking.

Just my opinion

Para Bellum
January 8, 2006, 10:05 AM
While I am at home, I don't carry my weapon
do so. you'll get used to it. After trying and buying no less than eight holsters, I finally ended up with the cheapest (and best) for my Glocks as a home-holster:


It's about EUR 12, - (U$ 14,-) and holds the gun tight because it grabs into the trigger bar. So kids can't pull it out and it wont drop out no matter what acrobatics you're doing with your kids. Still, there is no thumbbreak and it's extremey fast:
http://glockmeister.com/catalog/index.php/cPath/9_34?osCsid=ebda713cb00e5762183fc9b8b61a5370
http://glockmeister.com/catalog/images/Dsc00327.jpg

azspyder
January 8, 2006, 11:48 AM
Interesting thread! My wife and I (kids are grown up and gone) live in a 2000 sq ft condo in a very nice low crime area of Scottsdale AZ. But things do happen here...mostly burglaries from absent homeowners, but occasional home invasions. Being an old decepit man, I am a typical would-be victim. Except that I refuse to be one. I carry a .45 compact at all times outside the house. My wife will be doing the same in a month when she gets her CCW. At home, my carry weapon and a Surefire are on a table next to the couch in the den where we watch TV. Her weapon is in our bedroom on her bedside table with a Surefire. Also in that bedroom, next to my side of the bed, is a tactical 870 12ga with light and laser and a cellphone. In case of a home invasion while we not in the bedroom, the drill is that I defend while she boogies to the bedroom, locks the door and hunkers down after calling 911. She stays there till I call her out or the cops arrive. We also have an office upstairs where the computer is. A 9mm carbine with light and laser lives by the desk. A balcony allows coverage of the back arcadia door, the living room and the dining room from there. Our early warning system is a loud, cowardly beagle and a louder, fearless miniature dachshund who thinks he's a Doberman. If a snake belches two doors away, he's up and yelling.

And yes, we practice! We go to the range 4 times a week minimum. My wife handles her new SA Micro Compact very well and is competent with the shogun and the carbine.

Paranoia? Possibly, but it's a dangerous world out there, folks.:cool:

RioShooter
January 8, 2006, 12:16 PM
I carry a snubby in my pocket or in a holster when I'm at home.

I also keep a pistol in the bedroom along with a 12 ga. pump shotgun. Both of them have loaded magazines, with empty chambers.

I've never been threatened at home or on the street, but for most people it's a once in a lifetime incident that takes their lives!

BTW, when I leave the house I put trigger locks on my guns.

Be safe!

Chuck

gb_in_ga
January 8, 2006, 12:34 PM
Me? I keep my CCW pistol on my person when I'm awake. At bedtime, it goes in a case under the bed as a backup, for sleep-time primary I've got a revolver in the bedside table -- less to fumble with when groggy, just grab and shoot. Yes, a long gun is better, but since I don't have one (yet), I've got to make due with what I have.

Wildalaska
January 8, 2006, 01:36 PM
I dont even carry half the time when I am out, why do it at home.

WildtoomuchAlaska

superman
January 8, 2006, 02:01 PM
you should never keep a loaded gun near your bed. Good rule of thumb is place the gun far enough away that you will be awake when you get to it. My firearms instructor tried to beat that into my head. I thought he was just some crazy old man that had flashbacks from his war days. Until one night I and my partner investigated a accidental shooting in my area. A man, asleep, picked up his .44 ruger, that was in a holster and on his head board, and shot his thumb and two fingers off. This poor soul stated that all he remembers is that he heard a big bang and woke up to see half his hand splattered across his bedroom. I went directly home and unloaded two and moved two of my firearms that are with in arms reach of my bed.

Dont get me wrong, an unloaded firearm is a stick or a paper weight. and if thier in a safe, do you think that you wil be able to open it up and get a gun at three in the morning after you have just woke up. I hope you can.

This is what I do. I have a two year old daughter, who just happens to have the same curiosity about guns as her old man. So I have to keep them locked up. But that brings you back to the safe, i don't think that i would be able to defend my family if i had to open a safe. I have several pisture frames that are high enough on the wall that only I can reach them. The frames swing open to reveal a hand gun. These frames are tacticly placed through out my home. I place off brand guns that i know will shoot but are not a great loss if some one should break in and steal them.

something to think about. good luck and be safe.

HGKosteck
January 8, 2006, 02:01 PM
I find that attitude shocking.

To each thier own, but, I just don't understand the mentality of people who could carry, but don't.

Another shocking attitude expressed here by people regarding keeping a weapon hot.

If your weapon isn't hot, it's a club.

NDs don't just magically occur. A properly maintained weapon just isn't going to fire miraculously.

Learn to respect and maintain you weapon, snd you, nor your neighbors have anything to fear. from a round in the chamber.

HGKosteck
January 8, 2006, 02:07 PM
I gotta disagree with you on the "no loaded guns at the bedside." opinion.

You just need to put it in a place where you can reach it,and, practice doing it. Faceing the grip to you, rather than the barrel is a good idea though.

Personally, I keep my AR-15 Carbine at my bedside, loaded and hot, safety on.

My opinion is that a pistol should only be used to fight your way to your rifle, that you should've never put down in the first place, anyways:D

Wildalaska
January 8, 2006, 02:08 PM
To each thier own, but, I just don't understand the mentality of people who could carry, but don't.

Well when ya hit my age, seen what ive seen, live where I live and attain my level of philosophical sophsitication:D , you'll understand..

To each his won, my new years resolution is just to giggle at folks who carry three guns and 4 reloads and wear body armor...:)

WildhowmanygunsyoucarryteeheeAlaska

STAGE 2
January 8, 2006, 02:11 PM
I dont even carry half the time when I am out, why do it at home.

Here here. I'm all for having things accessible at home, but I would think that feeling the need to carry at home is more of an indication that one should move to a different area.

superman
January 8, 2006, 02:13 PM
People that dont carry are targets simple as that. I keep six loaded guns in my car. Some people think that is a little overboard. But when everyone else is out of ammo. They know that all they have to do is get into my trunk or open my door. A friend of mine cars no less than 2000 rounds for his M4. Of course were cops but we have a mind set that if s--t hits the fan were going to be ready. Every one needs that mind set. They dont have to take it to extremes like we do, but will to fight is a will to live. That is something that i live by.

superman
January 8, 2006, 02:19 PM
hgkostic...
if someone was to break into your home you would have time to get out of bed and get a gun. you have to get out of bed anyway. Let's say that you wake up and find someone standing over you. You think that your going to have time to grab your gun. NO.. the burgler already has you covered. I hope that never happens to you or any one else. But the sad part is that it will happen to someone, it is happeneing right now some where.

HGKosteck
January 8, 2006, 02:30 PM
I can garuntee you one thing..

I'll never live to an age where I feel complacent enough to be negligent
in defending myself and my family by not carrying when I have the option of doing so.

I live in a nice, quiet area, in the country, where, if somthing bad happened, our badly overstretched Sherrif's Dept would take quite a while to respond.

You can choose to laugh at me, and, that's fine. I carry my pistol, and, two reloads when I CCW, as well as my AR-15 in the trunk with 4 mags.

Bad things can happen, believe it or not.

HGKosteck
January 8, 2006, 02:34 PM
Your point is taken.

However, this is why proper peremeter security is just a no brainer, rather than a reason not to have a weapon at hand.

Security is within an arm's reach to get my carbine, and, I don't have to dig for a light, either, as I have an M3 on the handgaurds.

I run a stray dog rescue of sorts, and, one thing that AIN'T gonna happen to me is somone getting in my house without being "greeted".:)

At LEAST have a dog in your residence.

Hell, a small, yappy dog would do.

superman
January 8, 2006, 02:48 PM
Your right a good dog will no doubt help. The only dog that i have is a english walker who is so lazy that he has to be literally dragged out of the house by his front legs while he is on his back.

Also I am not trying to tell you how to protect your own home, I just want people to realize that accidents will happen. This man that had shot himself was very profficent with a gun. Have know his family for quite a while. I believed that he was dreaming of shooting ata range or someone was breaking into his home. Whatever the case may be he did in fact shoot himself. My point is this- becareful where you keep your weapons.

pickpocket
January 8, 2006, 06:46 PM
The Saturday referenced in the article was the same day that pickpocket posted. It isn't a question of your lifestyle, it's a function of what's going on in the world.
You don't get to make an appointment for your emergency, so you had better plan in advance. Everybody is planning; those that seem to be failing to plan are just planning to fail.

Eh, I think you missed my point. Like my tongue-in-cheek post about the various secret compartments that are strategically placed, I only mean that if you feel compelled to plan for the day that someone kicks in your door with a gun drawn and at the ready....then maybe you have bigger issues :)
Now, I'm not saying don't be prepared...like have a weapon close at hand at all times. I'm just saying there's prepared, and then there's creepy wackjob paranoid....that is, unless your lifestyle requires you to be paranoid.

I would venture to say that in almost every case where a family was found bound and killed in their own home, a home alarm and a handgun either on your person or in the nightstand would have ensured that the entire situation developed a bit differently.

As for not keeping a handgun close at hand when you sleep, I'll say it now and I'll say it in the future...it's all about training, training, training. I slept with a condition 1 handgun in hand and an M-16 less than 6 inches away for a year straight. People need to understand THEIR limits more than they need to understand their weapon's limits. That's what causes ND's ladies and gentlemen.

This is something I know: You can only be so prepared...past a certain point it's all chaos. The trick to staying alive is developing fundamental skills and knowing (read: practicing) how to apply those skills ad hoc...not stashing a hundred weapons throughout the house.

Just my opinion.

Glock35JHP
January 8, 2006, 07:14 PM
I have a Pit-bull-German Shepherd mix and she's a good watch dog. Just got a new male pit-bull puppy he won't be roaming the house for a year or so.

My USP.40 is on the nightstand and Mossberg 500 Cruiser with 7 rounds within reach at night. Then there is a Rock River Standard A2 under my bed with 3 additional mags near it. My longuns go into a safe when I'm not home.

Dust_Devil
January 8, 2006, 07:50 PM
I would rate being creepy wackjob paranoid if my placement of weapons was for zombies, dinosaurs and vampires rather than some crack addict wanting to break into my home. ;)

plateshooter
January 8, 2006, 07:51 PM
I like this quote:

Everyone needs down time. But if you are authorized to carry a weapon, and you walk outside without it, just take a deep breath, and say this to yourself...

"Baaa."

I keep one with me all the time. Home and away. Just last week there was a couple in their 50s almost killed by two guys with a baseball bat. They came home and the guys were already in their house. This was one street over from me beside a Country Club. My gun is on me or beside me all the time.

HGKosteck
January 8, 2006, 08:04 PM
Yep.

Words to live by.

pickpocket
January 8, 2006, 08:10 PM
True :rolleyes:

But isn't there a point where it just becomes so "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" to stash weapons all over the place?

I suppose my point is that it's one thing to plan for 80% of the things that can happen to you, and IMO just a bit extravagant to go that far over the edge trying to prepare for that 10% when good training and sensibilities will accomplish the same thing.

Realistically, can anyone give me a situation where 10 weapons caches in your house will actually do something that just having your carry weapon on you or near you at all times won't accomplish?

All things in moderation, right?

parrothead2581
January 8, 2006, 08:45 PM
I could legally carry in NC but don't. Irresponsible? Negligent to my family? I don't think so. The carry laws in NC are so strict that frankly, it would do me little good. Let's see, I can't carry in:

Schools, public or private,
all levels including universities. §14-269.2

Assemblies and establishments where
admission was charged. §14-269.3

Assemblies and establishments where
alcohol is both sold and consumed. §14-269.3

State Buildings: State
Capitol Building, the Executive Mansion, the Western
Residence of the Governor, or on the grounds of any of
these buildings, and any building housing any court of the
General Court of Justice. §14-269.4

State office buildings or any portion of a
building in which there are State offices. §14-415.11(c)

Law Enforcement or Correctional Facilities.
§14-415.11(c)

Financial Institutions.
§14-415.11(c)

Events Occurring in Public:
It shall be unlawful for any person participating in,
affiliated with, or present as a spectator at any
parade, funeral procession, picket line, or
demonstration upon any private health care
facility or upon any public place owned or under the control
of the State or any of its political subdivisions to
willfully or intentionally possess or have immediate access
to any dangerous weapon. §14-277.2

Areas of emergencies or
riots. §14-288.7

Where notice of carrying a
concealed handgun is prohibited by the
posting of a conspicuous notice or statement.
§14-415.11(c)

Now I know many of these, are nationwide carry laws, but some are not, namely the alcohol restriction. So if I want to go downtown for some dinner and a baseball game, I have to leave my gun in the car while downtown (not many restaurants w/o alcohol). Now, was I able to carry in more areas, I would, but it's frankly not feasible for me. In the meantime, to have something with me, I carry an ASP, a pair of pocket knives, exercise like there's no tomorrow and walk with a purpose. Better than nothing I suppose. Stay safe...

HGKosteck
January 8, 2006, 08:53 PM
Cool your jets.

I don't suggest that you carry in places you aren't legally able to do so.

That's illegal, and, somtimes you have no choice.

I have had to alter my lefestyle somewhat to carry most places I and my family go, and, that's my choice.

If you are going to a place where you can legally carry, and, don't?

Well, I'll stick by my words then.

If you have the ability to carry and, don't, you are being negligent in the defense of yourself and, those with you, IMO.

In TX, it's the 51% rule as far as booze in resturants go and, they have big 51% signs posted.

At schools, the parking lot is ok, but, not the building or events.

Sorry if I hurt your feelings or whatever, but, it's how I feel about the issue.

parrothead2581
January 8, 2006, 08:59 PM
You didn't hurt my feelings whatsoever HGKosteck . And in your neck of the woods, with an overstretched Sheriff's Dept., I would be shocked if you didn't carry. I was simply stating why I don't CCW. And I don't consider myself negligent. I would fight to the death for myself, family anf friends. Again, my lifestyle is not suited for it right now.

My lady and I both love baseball and good food, where they happen to sell alcohol; two places we can't carry. I doubt she'll change her lifestyle in those respects, but maybe I can convince her. If so, I have no problem carrying (just need to find a holster for a S&W 686 4" and a Colt Gov't to handle NC summers). In the meantime, I've made adjustments for defense. Aikido, Kendo, an ASP, and a pair of pocket knives. I think that's far from negligent. A firearm, isn't the end all, be all form of defense for me, and I own quite a few. When it's my time to go it's my time to go. Simple as that.

I promote people to carry them, I want them to carry them. However, it's just not right for me at this time.

No hard feelings HGKosteck. Stay safe...

IndianaDean
January 8, 2006, 09:06 PM
Keep a handgun on your hip.

Keep it hot.

At night, a longarm loaded and hot by the bedside.

Easy.

+1. I only have a couple of safes, and I don't want to leave loaded guns around the house where someone could find and get them if they broke in while no one was home. I keep one loaded by the bed and I carry one concealed around the house.
That way, I also get used to always having one on me.

And I don't agree with the comment about moving if one has to carry at home. The biggest danger there to me is being in condition one while at home. If a daytime home invasion occurred, being in condition 1 and not having a weapon right there to defend myself would likely cost me my life. Granted, it's very unlikely it would ever happen. But I think when you're at home and in that condition is when it is most likely to happen.

Wildalaska
January 8, 2006, 09:10 PM
Bad things can happen, believe it or not.

You can get hit on the head with a meteor, do you wear a tin pot all the time..

WildanddoyouwearaseatbeltAlaska

Chris Phelps
January 9, 2006, 09:16 AM
When I was younger, I watched a movie called "the watcher". This movie explained in great detail about how the killer would hide in a house all night because people are alert at night... but during the morning, they felt safe wandering around their house with their guard down. I guess this movie scarred me for life. I am now prepared for pretty much anything.

My house: Each room downstairs has at least one knife hidden in each room, the upstairs holds 2-3 per room (hidden). I have one with a sheath screwed into the wall next to my bed, on rubber pads as to not make noise when I draw it. There is a folding (quick open) knife on my night stand, and the bulk of my knife collection is in a 4-drawer cabinet about 5 feet away from my bed. All of my firearms are stored in a cabinet downstairs, and any of them which have removable clips, the clips are loaded and sitting on the shelf just above the firearms. I also have my neighbor and best friend, Josh, on speed dial. He can see 3 sides of my house without even walking outside, and is well armed. He also has a key to the house. I am picking up a 9MM handgun next wednesday, and when I do, it will be loaded and sitting on my nightstand in place of my folder.

My bedroom is a smaller room in the shape of an L, and there is no overhead lighting over my bed, and the light switch by the door is connected to a small desk lamp near the door. I also have a remote controller for the switch. When it is flicked on, my bed is not illuminated to the point that you can see it.

Musketeer
January 9, 2006, 10:32 AM
Long Island has had rampant home invasions over the past year. They have been nightime break ins while people are sleeping, forced front door entry, police imposters at the front door, back door entries, broken window entiries, on and on. They have taken place in good and bad areas. People have been caught yet the crimes go on. Occupants are often tied up and on many occasions roughed up. At least one woman I know of was molested. Just this pas Sunday an appartment full of people for a party in a nice area was invaded by a group of criminals who had everyone lay on the floor while they cleaned them and the place out.

Then there were the two invasions in RIchmond VA two weeks ago. In one a family of fours (including two girls under 10) were tied to chairs and had their throats cut, then left there with the house set on fire (it didn't take so the bodies were found intact). THe same crew killed another family of three less than a week later, again tied in chairs but the method of killing was not reported.

For the nightime break in while sleeping I am not nearly as worried. The first floor is patrolled by Colt, our 104 pound Rhodesian Ridgeback. He takes his home security role very seriously and only barks when something is there. The neighborhood trouble making teens know him by sight and sound and give him a wide berth. The family sleeps upstairs. The top draw of the dresser has my condition 1 1911 and spare mag with a high power flashlight. On the wife's side of the bed, on the top shelf of the closet and coverred by 20 pounds comforters is a Remington 870 18 1/2" 12 gage. It is a one second process to pull it out from under them, although there will be plenty of cleaning up afterwards. It is loaded but does not have one in the chamber. We have a four year old at present and the shottys location and condition (pump release must be pressed to actuate as well), combined with her limitiations make it safe at present. This will be a continuous re-evaluation process combined with education as she grows. No matter what though the family sleeping break in does not worry me as the dog will give us plenty of warning. The cell phones are upstairs and the staircase is easy to cover.

My real fear is the waking hours break. We have had many of these on Long Island. I am either wearing the 1911 IWB the whole time I am home and awake or will use a SmartCarry with a small concealable 9mm and spare mag. Our house is one that the home invaders would NOT leave with out a scratch as has happenned on 40 + occasions.

Musketeer
January 9, 2006, 10:35 AM
You can get hit on the head with a meteor, do you wear a tin pot all the time..


No but I do keep my tinfoil helemt on at night to prevent the secret mind control rays from the GPS sattelites from getting to my brain!

Seriously though. My house will probably never have a fire but I have a fire extinguisher. I do not expect to die at a young age but I have insurance for my family incase I do.

I have never heard of a person hit by a meteor but I know of plenty who have been killed by violent criminals, sometimes completely randomly.

dfaugh
January 9, 2006, 11:03 AM
Prefer not to keep loaded guns around, so:

Front hall closet (next to front door): 9mm carbine, with magazine seperate
Family room (rear of house): SKS-M, loaded 30 rd mag nearby
Bedroom: upstairs, Yugo SKS 3 stripper clips handy (and a bayonet to boot)

CCTV around the house, at all approaches/directions(although I don't use it much)

Early warning system--5 German shepherds

spacemanspiff
January 9, 2006, 11:45 AM
just do what i do:
keep a whiny liberal annoying roommate in the first room next to the front door. the intruder(s) will have more than enough time to occupy themselves with him while i don my armor and speedload ten extra AR mags. i can also set up my tripwire defenses and shaped charges as the intruder(s) approach my end of the home.

did i ever mention how tactical i am?

gddyup
January 9, 2006, 01:27 PM
I carry my XD9 everywhere I can. When I get off duty, it comes on duty and does not leave my side until I go to bed. Then, it sits hidden under my bed within arms reach if needed. My wife now carrys her Kahr with us when we go out and it also sits on her side of the bed within easy reach if needed. There's no point in having a handgun where it's out of reach if needed because you never know when you might need it.

When I go to work, I check my bunker gear, helmet, air pack, and my regualtor/face mask every morning. In my bunker pants I carry 2 flashlights, 5 door chocks, 30-40 cement nails, a collapsable rescue tool, 25 ft of 9000 lb webbing, 25 ft of dynamic quick rope, 2 pairs of wire cutters, a rescue hook/seatbelt cutter, and 2 large carabineers. On my bunker coat I have another flashlight, my portable radio, an extra rescue hook, and my extrication gloves. When I go into a structure fire, depending on where and what I am tasked with, I'll be heading in with ANOTHER box light slung over my shoulder and typically a set of irons (axe and halligan) or the hoseline. Hopefully the day never comes where I get into a situation where I may have to use half this stuff, but I'm sure as hell glad I carry it with me every time! And that stuff gets damn heavy once you add in the free weight of just the bunker gear, helmet, and air pack (70-75 pounds in full gear with pack). I carry all this damn stuff not because I need it but because I might need it. If I ever get stuck in a situation where my life depends on those few small tools I brought into that building with me, I'll be damn happy they weren't sitting out on my engine or in my locker!!

If you have the means, the ability, and the training to use these possible life saving tools, it makes no sense to leave them somewhere where they will do you absolutely no good when your ass gets stuck "in the fire". There's a saying that instructors drill into the heads of all students who get into their first fire training class and that saying is "NEVER GET OFF YOUR TRUCK WITHOUT A TOOL!". Simply stated, never get caught without a tool. It might just save your life.

pickpocket
January 9, 2006, 05:00 PM
You know...I just remembered I had a similar conversation with a friend last week. He said that someone told him that if you're going to keep a handgun by the bed to NEVER keep it without one in the chamber. "Why?" I asked....
Well, apparently if you need it you won't have time to chamber a round...either that or you'll get tripped up worrying about whether or not you already have a round chambered and lose valuable reaction time....or because you could trip over yourself because you're not focused on the threat but instead of.... it went on and on.

Ok, so what a bunch of crap, that's what I say. If you're worried about blowing your hand off or having one of your kids grab it or whatever, keep the freaking thing in condition 3. I do. You know what!?! If you train yourself appropriately, then it's second nature to just rack the slide as you roll out of bed. If you get tripped up having to walk and chamber a round, then I would question whether or not you should be defending your home with a handgun anyways :)

Ok... had to get that out there

Capt Charlie
January 9, 2006, 05:15 PM
It's never a good idea to place a gun where the trigger finger can engage without the brain being in gear. Some folks are wide awake in an instant, but it takes me a few moments to shake the cobwebs loose. My solution is what I call the two-step rule. I place the weapon, cocked and locked, in a place that requires two, thought-out but quick movements to access the gun. First, I must open the nightstand drawer. Second, it must be removed from a snapped holster. I can do both in a heartbeat, but I can't do it accidentally while half-asleep. By the way, no kids in the house.

gddyup
January 9, 2006, 05:29 PM
Pickpocket, your friend has a valid point.... and so do you. Train and handle/carry your chosen piece in the condition you are most comfortable with. I personally believe in carrying condition 1, always. Round chambered and safety on (if equipped). Both of the handguns in my house currently have no manual safety so I don't have to bother with the safety part but they are always in condition 1.

My wife was a condition 3 person before I challenged her to a race. We verified my XD as safe, locked away the real ammo, loaded a magazine with snap caps, chose a safe area for dry fire that was 90 degrees off my course, and had a little race. First, she was to draw, slingshot, and fire into the safe zone with me running at her from 20 feet. Then, after giving her the advantage multiple times from that position, we changed it to draw and fire from the same distance with the gun in condition 1. I proved the point that condition 1 is the faster and easier way to engage if needed. Tueller drill no doubt but a very effective way to show the difference between condition 1 and 3.

parrothead2581
January 9, 2006, 05:36 PM
Personally, I keep a .357 mag revolver by my bed. Pull the trigger, it goes "boom!" No slide to worry about racking, or safety to flip off. True, I'm limited by six shots, but anymore than that and I'm probably dead. That's just my choice and what I'm most comfortable with. I would prefer my Colt .45 not have to sit in an evident room because of some scumbag. :)

kesserman
January 9, 2006, 06:14 PM
What percentage of anyone here has ever had anyone break into their homes while they're home?

I've known four people in my life that have had they're homes broken into. Three of them were at work. One crook - I'm not making this up - Backed a moving truck up to the house and emptied it. The crooks knew nobody was at home.

Most robberies occur between 10 am and 2 pm.

It's all about risk management. If you leave several guns around the house unlocked, you've just armed the guy whose going to be waiting for you when you get home (or who is selling your XD to one of his pals for $100.)

Crooks don't want any trouble - If they like your house, they are going to wait for you to leave. Trust me, they have all the time in the world to learn your routine, it's not like they're missing work.

Could you wind up face to face with a home invader? Yes. It could happen, if that's how you choose to see the world.

A good friend of mine is a social worker who studies violence. Statistically, the one who is going to hurt you will be someone you know (family member, or friend).

It's easier to think it's going to be a crackhead looking for $20.

pickpocket
January 9, 2006, 08:40 PM
gddyup;
ya true, but I was speaking strictly of sleeping next to your weapon. Keeping the weapon in condition 3 while you sleep is just different spin on Capt Charlie's two-step rule. It ensures that not only do you have to grab the weapon, but you have to make an effort to chamber a round...the idea being that you won't accidentally blow off your fingers....or worse.
As for your drill with the wife: hell yeah you carry in condition 1. Chances of you having to drill a guy between the eyes as he charges you on the street are exponentially greater than having to do it from your bed as you shake the cobwebs off.

Chris Phelps
January 9, 2006, 09:06 PM
A good friend of mine is a social worker who studies violence. Statistically, the one who is going to hurt you will be someone you know (family member, or friend).


It's funny you should mention that. In the past month, I have had to come to a rather hard-faced conclusion that I have no true friends. It had nothing to do with one of them trying to shoot me or anything like that... but some things happened and I ended up losing someone I thought was my best friend (for 15 Years). It kind of sketches me out because he is the type of person who I would find wandering around in my house at 2AM some random tuesday night. Situations like that always leave you questioning everyone, regardless of how long you have known them. But, in a way, I guess that is a good thing.

IndianaDean
January 9, 2006, 09:25 PM
"If you train yourself appropriately, then it's second nature to just rack the slide as you roll out of bed. If you get tripped up having to walk and chamber a round, then I would question whether or not you should be defending your home with a handgun anyways "

Right. I questioned keeping one in the chamber when I took the advanced NRA course. So the instructor had me take a Glock with a dummy round, put it in my holster, without the dummy round in the chamber. He stood 25 feet away. He even told me when he was going to run at me, and for me to pull the Glock, and rack it to fire. He was on me before I could rack it. I had it in position to fire, but the chamber was empty.

Always keep one in the chamber.

ethernectar
January 9, 2006, 09:30 PM
Sig .45 in a bedroom drawer. Magazines (+P HP) in a different drawer with a Streamlight. Everything else in the safe. 12GA Benelli loaded but not chambered in the front of the safe. Wouldn't go to a rifle, too many neighbors.

That's what i'm comfortable with. But its just me and the cat, in a good neighborhood.

pickpocket
January 9, 2006, 10:22 PM
IndianaDean:

Waking hours walking around is one thing...sleeping is completly another.
Try this drill:

Go to sleep. Wake up when your wife (or friend) startles you awake as he approaches your bed. See if your reaction time helps when you have one in the chamber and when you don't.

Point is, it's not the same type of drill that the NRA instructor gave you. It's apples and oranges.

alpineman
January 9, 2006, 10:39 PM
Keep a handgun on your hip.

Keep it hot.

At night, a longarm loaded and hot by the bedside.

Easy.

Bingo. + another 1

I don't see why some of the prior posts suggest that's extreme. It's just a gun, y'all. I wear a multi-tool on my belt, too, though I don't need it very often. But why leave it at home?

Let's not confuse preparation with paranoia. I thought it was a good thing to be a little more prepared... :confused:

Wildalaska
January 9, 2006, 11:08 PM
When I was younger, I watched a movie called "the watcher". This movie explained in great detail about how the killer would hide in a house all night because people are alert at night... but during the morning, they felt safe wandering around their house with their guard down. I guess this movie scarred me for life. I am now prepared for pretty much anything.

Reality imitates art again:D

WildifibasedmylifeontvidbeasoccerstarAlaska

parrothead2581
January 9, 2006, 11:23 PM
alpineman,
I didn't interpret those posts as meaning keeping a gun on your hip or a long arm by your bed was excessive, but rather keeping a sidearm on your hip and three hi cap back up magazines,(are people really going to coninue attacking you when their buddies are hitting the ground?) and at home having a shotgun with a five shot extension (I've got a 2 shot extension), and a five shot sidesaddle as being excessive. I think they're just trying to say that there's a line between being prepared and perhaps going overboard. You can't prepare for everything unfortunately.

If I wanted to be truly prepared when I went swimming in the ocean I would carry a spear gun, and a full body mesh swimsuit, but I don't. I know when and where to swim, and what not to do. Now granted ocean swimming isn't the street, but I think you get my point. Some people take things to what many consider an extreme. It's all in the mindset.

With that, I'm actually looking at getting a CCW here in NC, mostly for car use. I know this argument is flawed, but it's the best I can do on Monday at 1130pm!

Capt Charlie
January 10, 2006, 12:35 AM
Some people take things to what many consider an extreme. It's all in the mindset.
Actually, I think it's all in the location. There are places I'd feel safe with no gun at all (not many of those :( ), and there are places one j-frame in the house would suffice. Then again, there are places I wouldn't feel safe with a tripod mounted, .50 cal BMG, Claymores, and Concertina wire :D . You just can't compare the circumstances of a guy living at Jacob's Lake, AZ with someone living in the worst part of Prince George County, MD.

HGKosteck
January 10, 2006, 01:22 AM
Obviously some areas are going to be more high threat than others. Many people snicker at preparedness, or discount taking precautions by saying..

-It won't happen here.

or

-If your that worried, you should move.
(I was actually shocked to hear people on a gun board say this last one. The only time I'd heard that said before was by anti-gunners.)

BUT-

I'm sure the kids in Columbine had every confidence thier school was not going to become a shooting gallery.

I'm sure the people enjoying a liesurely lunch at Luby's in Killeen, TX weren't
expecting a nut to drive his truck through the wall and, start calmly gunning people down.

The examples go on and on.

"I never thought it could happen here!" is a sentance that makes my stomach turn and, chills run up my back.

My wife has had to use her shotgun to warn off the drunk and abuseive husband of a woman that lives about a mile away from us that had come to our house for refuge one night when I was out of town.

We've had zero crime problems out here in 7 years until that time.

My blood just goes cold when I think it could've been me on the news, talking about my dead or injured wife and, the other dead or injured woman saying...

"I just never thought it could happen here."

Yes, I carry in the house. and, when I go out.
Yes, I carry two reloads. (admittedly, not all the time in the house, but, 90% of wakeing hours I've got my pistol.
Yes, I keep a loaded and hot AR Carbine or Mossber 500 at my bedisde at night.

I guess some people here would laugh at that, or call me "crazy"....That's fine.

I refuse to be a victim.

Wildalaska
January 10, 2006, 01:35 AM
I'm sure the kids in Columbine had every confidence thier school was not going to become a shooting gallery.


I'm sure the people enjoying a liesurely lunch at Luby's in Killeen, TX weren't
expecting a nut to drive his truck through the wall and, start calmly gunning people down.


Statistically insignificant

My wife has had to use her shotgun to warn off the drunk and abuseive husband of a woman that lives about a mile away from us that had come to our house for refuge one night when I was out of town.

Was he armed?

I refuse to be a victim.

I assume you haveairbags and wear a seatbelt then

WilddontgotothedreitherAlaska

HGKosteck
January 10, 2006, 08:00 AM
It's fine you can dismiss tragic events as "insignifigant".

I won't.

Yes, I do have a seatbelt and airbags in my vehicle.

I used to be an EMT and saw the results of not having them.

No, the husband wasn't armed.

He didn't need to be. He had just knocked around his wife and, was rageing and drunk and, beating on the door to my house, on my property, and, had he breached the door, my wife would've been within her rights to shoot him.

Look, we already know we don't agree on this issue, so why push it by responding to my posts?

Tim Burke
January 10, 2006, 08:34 AM
The thing about statistics... when something bad happens, the statistical insignificance of the event is no comfort to the victim.

One death is a tragedy; a million is a statistic. - Joseph Stalin (http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/josephstal137476.html)

gddyup
January 10, 2006, 10:11 AM
+1 HGK and Tim

Capt Charlie
January 10, 2006, 12:46 PM
Look, we already know we don't agree on this issue, so why push it by responding to my posts?
We push it because we learn from debates. We glean good things from both sides of an argument that often result in sound and solid defense techniques ;) .

pickpocket
January 10, 2006, 01:15 PM
It's fine you can dismiss tragic events as "insignifigant".

It's not so much 'dismissing'....personally I think it's more like trying to prepare yourself for getting hit in the head with a meteor. How prepared can you really be for some situations, or how far are you willing to go to be prepared for something that honestly has a less-than-nominal probability of happening?

On that note...I think that if someone is going to such lengths to prepare themselves for a statistically improbable event -- I would hope that the rest of their fundamental skills are...shall we say....bulletproof?

Wildalaska
January 10, 2006, 01:18 PM
It's fine you can dismiss tragic events as "insignifigant".

I didnt dismiss them as insiginificant. Read it again.

Yes, I do have a seatbelt and airbags in my vehicle.


Do you wear your seatbelt every time you drive your car?

Look, we already know we don't agree on this issue, so why push it by responding to my posts?


So that lurkers and non particpants in the discussion can learn that there are views in the "gun club" associated with reasonableness :)

WildsosleepyAlaska

Chris Phelps
January 10, 2006, 01:31 PM
Do you wear your seatbelt every time you drive your car?


I know I do... as does everyone who rides with me. I have actually made someone walk home (20 miles) because they refused to wear a seatbelt while riding with me one day. Car accidents are incredibly common... and the percentage of fatalities is pretty high. Seat belts are common sense. Just my opinion.

Perhaps in some parts of the country, CCW is just as important, as muggings and murder are equally as common as car accidents? I know they arent where I live. I dont CCW, and probably never will. There is no need. It sounds like you live in the same type of area. People who live in cities and see violence all the time are sure to have a drastically different opinion than us... but they are just as right as we are. Its all about the area you live in.

Wildalaska
January 10, 2006, 01:36 PM
It sounds like you live in the same type of area.

No actually I live in a gnarly area and I do cary a lot of the time (I forgot today)...

But I dont carry in my home. Nor do I tape loaded guns under the cofee table, have one in the bathroom, etc.

I wonder how many folks here actually know someone who has been the victim of a random home invasion

WildcrankythismorningyikesAlaska

Chris Phelps
January 10, 2006, 01:50 PM
My aunt and uncle had their home broken into one night. They were out in NY for the weekend, and my cousin was staying at my house. We had taken a trip down to his house which was only 2 miles away from mine. As we pulled into the driveway, I spotted an upstairs light on. I didnt think anything of it... " you left the light on." He responded "no, I didnt." No sooner had he gotten the words out of his mouth when the light went out. I quickly killed my headlights and backed out of the driveway. I parked acrossed the main road, which was about 40 feet away. One kid exited the front door, and stood on the porch looking around for about 30 seconds. Then a second kid exited, and they ran out back and down the snowmobile trail. To the best of our knowledge, nothing had been stolen. The police arrived on the scene about 1 hour later. (we live in the middle of nowhere).

in that same month, there was one break-in attempt on my house in the middle of the night, which was thwarted off by my hanging a 20 guage out my window and touching off a round at the ground. 10 seconds later, I heard a truck start and tear off down the road. within the 2 weeks following, my car had been broken into twice.

I moved to Maine about 2 1/2 years ago. in my first 3 months in this state my car had been broken into 5 times. They got 2 of my 300cd cases, my car stereo, subs, amps, and speakers. My neighbor had his snowboard stolen out of his car. This was in an area we were told had a 0 crime rate. Noone knew who did it... noone saw anything, and nothing has happened there since.

What happens if someone gets brave one night and breaks into my house while I am there and asleep, and they are armed? Do I want to be prepared for anything, and willing to defend myself... or do I want to be the one whos last words were " I never saw it comming." ? I refuse to be the latter.

pickpocket
January 10, 2006, 02:07 PM
or do I want to be the one whos last words were " I never saw it comming." ? I refuse to be the latter.

Considering the tone of the rest of your post, you have already forfieted the opportunity to say "I never saw it coming" :rolleyes:
By this time you've had PLENTY of warning that the universe has been lining you up in its crosshairs...:D

Chris Phelps
January 10, 2006, 02:12 PM
ahh how right you are. But thats just it... everyone knows this crap happens in the world, so in fact, those who choose to not be ready for it can never say they didnt see it comming, can they?

pickpocket
January 10, 2006, 02:19 PM
haha...yeah but there's a difference. Its the difference between knowing that there's traffic cops out there and still not slowing down...and SEEING 10 of them with cars pulled over on your way to work but still not slowing down.

Or...I know there's meteors out there and that they crash to earth occassionally...but how real is the threat of getting hit in the head. :)

Risk management, gentlemen. I believe there's significant difference between acknowledging possibilities and preparing for probabilities.

Trip20
January 10, 2006, 02:48 PM
This post (http://thefiringline.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1717818&postcount=26), says it all
PythonGuy ~

Good post. Let me try to find some common ground.

I know what you mean about some posts being funny. You're amused by folks who carry everywhere. I'm bemused when I see threads with titles like, "Do you carry to a friend's house?" "Do you carry at home?" "Do you carry to work?" "Do you carry at church?" etc ad infinitum.

The reason those threads amuse me is because, well, I carry. And I go places and do things. I don't carry "to a friend's house," or "to church" or "at home" -- I simply carry, wherever I might be. My default setting is to carry and if I'm not carrying it is because I made a deliberate decision not to do so right then. The reason I carry is never because I think whatever I'm doing is particularly dangerous; if I think something is particularly dangerous, I simply don't do it (or at least I find a way to do it more safely -- such as during the day instead of at night, or with a friend instead of alone). So all the angst about whether carry is appropriate in a particular venue just leaves me bemused.

A lot of people do the exact opposite. They go places and do things, but their default setting is to leave the gun locked up at home. If they carry at all, it's because they made a conscious decision to carry that day -- generally because they thought they were doing something particularly dangerous. I don't do it that way simply because my crystal ball has never been very good and I've noticed that bad things generally happen to me when I'm not expecting it. If other folks have noticed that bad things happen to them only when they are expecting it and prepared for it, who am I to argue? It's their lives.

I just wish they could refrain from insulting me for my choices, in the same way I refrain from insulting them for their choices.

pax

miconoakisland
January 12, 2006, 10:16 PM
Like Pax, my default is armed. Random violence is just that---random.

My chances of randomly needing a firearm, while randomly carrying, while randomly becoming a victim of random violence are astronomically remote.

The reason I carry all the time is not because of the odds of a needed occurrance, but because of what's at stake---my life. Do you only use your seatbelt some of the time? Do you only ride in an airbag-equipped vehicle? Do you drive drunk and speed only on occassion? Do you only point a gun and pull the trigger if you "think" a firearm is unloaded?

Personal safety is an important issue for me. To lay bleeding and dying, knowing I could've changed/avoided it all if I had just followed my own safety rules would be a haunting last thought. I won't become a victim of my own negligence.

I'm not a paranoid fanatic, I live in a very "safe" area, but "on me, within arms reach" where legally available to me is my way of doing things. But, I am not restricted by these things, nor do I live looking over my shoulder. Being armed is no more of a lifestyle to me than being clothed, buckled up, money-clipped/ID'd, and keyed, etc. I've only needed my driver's license/CHP once during a road block check in over six years, but I carry them with me everytime--does that make me paranoid or prepared?

Harley Quinn
January 12, 2006, 10:38 PM
Well for one thing they had an article in the paper about a 15 year old being beat to death while waiting on a bus in a nice area. 10:30 am in the morn on a nice sunny day on a busy street and not one person helped this youngster.

3 gangsta's jumped out of a car and beat him to death. Mind you at least no less then 50 cars a minute go by this corner or more at this time of day.
No help Nothing except a 911 call by a passing Vehicle.:mad:

By the time the police got there he was dead. Some information on the car and it is a vehicle that was seen at a prior shooting a few nights before.

He was not supposed to be in a gang, but then who knows. Someone said it is initiation time and they are on the roam to prove they can kill innocents to get into the gang.:barf:

I understand the normal everyday citizen not wanting to get involved but most coppers and retired ones are not like that at all. When the shtf I hope I am ready. I try to be alert and packing.

I have to tell you if I saw that I would stop, I would have shot all three, you can take that to the bank.
I know all what if and what for and this and that.
But at the time it would all have been, I want to protect that youngster.

If you don't have that mind set don't carry. IMHO

Why carry? Because...

To stay on topic for those who seem obsessed against small deviations.
I will say I have several guns (loaded) well placed around the house and numerous batons and canes.
While I sleep I have a loaded 40 cal no more than 2' from me.

Harley

pickpocket
January 13, 2006, 12:18 AM
Yeah, we all understand "why carry"....but the main point of the thread was about the placement of defensive weapons in your home, though...not whether or not people should carry on the street.

Nobody is saying people who carry are over-doing it.... it's the fact that some people feel the need to go all 007 in their homes just in case that has us going back and forth :)

Harley Quinn
January 13, 2006, 01:42 AM
I remember a SGt I knew. I went to his house to take a car to him and drop it off for the next day so he would have it. My Partner and I went our merry way.
He was in a tee shirt and trousers, on his hip was his service revolver. I was surprised. He explained he never was without it, in his home, car, at work etc.
1977
I believe it had to be the area he lived in at the time. Lake View Terrace.
Rodney King area of confrontation (much later).
But it started me asking others. Do you guys carry at home in the house in the garage, Yep, lots of them were infatic about it 'Yes' was the answer most of the time.

I became much more in tuned to it and have been aware and had them around but not on me at every turn. Still that way.

I am talking about active police officers and retired. Not joe citizen.
(I know all of us are citizens)...

When I moved to the Sacramento area I moved into an area and across the street fom me was a CHP. He carried all the time, you saw it when he was mowing his lawn.
I talked to him about it, he was in a shooting right where we were talking, a couple of years prior when a couple of Gangsta's tried to come into his open garage about 11 in the eve.
He was walking his dog and when he got home they were in his garage, they saw him jumped into their car and tried to run over him, he shot both of them.
They fled and were arrested later at the hospital.
They were out of their area and passing thru and thought it was an easy mark. Wrong.

Harley

pickpocket
January 13, 2006, 10:16 AM
Right on! No, I think you're missing my point as well, though. If you're going to carry, then carry. Your CCW should be like your wallet or your shoes, always on or within reach.

There's a fine line between prepared and paranoid, though. If you carry when you're at home, good. If you carry while mowing your yard, good. If you place 10 different weapons caches around your house awaiting the day that Rainbow Six comes storming through your door, then maybe you have issues :p

sparkysteve
January 14, 2006, 10:43 AM
I have my .357 revolver, 2 speed-loaders, and a flashlight in my bedroom dresser drawer. My 90 pound Labrador will notify me of any unwanted guests. That's enough for me. I don't need to hide a gun in every room of my house. I think anyone who does is paranoid, has something to hide, or lives in a much rougher nieghborhood than mine. To each their own I guess.

Tim Burke
January 14, 2006, 11:55 AM
Your CCW should be like your wallet or your shoes, always on or within reach.If I have my wallet and shoes on, I probably do have my CCW with me in the house. However, I don't always have my wallet & shoes on or within reach. In a multi-level house, I'd want at least 1 ready safe and 2 ready guns on each level. In an apartment, a bedstand ready safe may be sufficient.