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BillyGoat
December 25, 2005, 12:04 AM
I previously asked for advice on how to remedy a new scope rifle combo that would not hold any sort of a group and received a variety of answers that included checking for any part of the barrel touching and possibly free floating it myself. After examining the rifle more closely I have found that the right side of the barrel does come in contact with the forepiece. I am interested but very new at any of these gunsmithing ideas and am in need of directions and advice. I understand the idea of a barrel free floating but am unsure as to how i myself can create a free-floating barrel. At the risk of sounding silly, how do I create a free-floating barrel? The rifle is a Ruger MkII chambered in .308 Win.

mtnboomer
December 25, 2005, 12:16 AM
Free-floating a rifle barrel is probably one of the simplest gunsmithing projects there is. All that is required is a wooden dowel and sandpaper. Since the barrel channel in your stock is already slightly larger than your barrel all you need is a dowel approximately the same size as the barrel channel. Wrap 100-grit paper around the dowel and relieve the area that touches your barrel. Some stocks have a pressure-point at the end of the forearm on the bottom of the channel and this is normal. After removing a small amount of wood from the side of the forearm, reassemble the gun and check to see if you can side a dollar bill from the muzzle to the action. If not, a little more wood needs to be removed where the bill binds. If yor stock has a pressure-point you will have to start the bill behind it.

Joe Bloggs
December 25, 2005, 05:36 AM
You can safely remove the pressure point from the Ruger stock as well. I do it with all of mine as it causes the point of impact to change as the barrel heats up. The Ruger bedding system doesn't require work, just careful attention to action screw tension.

Harry Bonar
December 25, 2005, 10:44 AM
Dear Shjooter:
Be sure to float that bbl out from the action face out! And, use a carboard piece to check with - snipers in Nam wanted a channel wide enough to wipe debris from underneath the bbl! The Nam era sniper I used to do work for wanted at least 1/16" on each side!
If you wanted to, you could also "glass bed" that recoil lug area - I've noticed Rugers slide around unless you do this and makes floating easier in the center of the channel.
Hope this helps!
Harry B.