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View Full Version : how to shorten trigger pull on SIG 228?


Darthmaum
June 28, 1999, 01:34 AM
I have a SIG P228, and noticed in SIG's catalog recently that the trigger pull can be shortened by "messing with" the little screw (my term.) above the trigger, near the slide release lever.

My ?'s are: Is this advisable? Will it noticeably effect performance? Can it be done by the layperson, and if not, how much could I expect to pay, should I choose to have it done?

Any insight would be appreciated!

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Janet Reno, aka "tertiary adjunct 5 of 12"... "We are BIG BROTHER. Resistance is futile, you will be assimilated..."

Fred
June 28, 1999, 12:25 PM
Hmm, not sure I understand your question. If you mean "lighten" the trigger pull, I've never heard about a screw adjustment for Sig's. If you mean shorten the length from the backstrap to the front of the trigger (very useful for smaller hands), this can be done by changing the trigger. Sig, and some aftermarket vendors, makes a short trigger for the P228/229 that does this. I installed one on my P228 because I have small hands with short fingers. It made it much easier for me to grip the gun and squeeze the trigger properly.

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Regards - AZFred

Darthmaum
June 28, 1999, 05:38 PM
Fred,

Now I can't find where in the catalog I saw that reference! I believe I was thinking of what you were describing in your reply. Is it pretty simple to replace the trigger, where I could do it myself, or would I need to take it to a smithy? (I grew up around cars and machines, so am pretty good w/ tools). What exactly would it involve to replace it?

I'm not sure if I even want to do it, it was just a thought. The pull does seem a bit long, but not un-workable.

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Janet Reno, aka "tertiary adjunct 5 of 12"... "We are BIG BROTHER. Resistance is futile, you will be assimilated..."

blades67
June 29, 1999, 03:31 AM
You would be best advised having a gunsmith install the short trigger for you. If you start pulling your Sig apart and make a mistake, your gunsmith will charge you twice, once for fixing your goof, and once for installing the trigger. ;)

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May your lead always hit center mass and your brass always land in your range bag.

~Blades~

Fred
June 29, 1999, 12:45 PM
Darth...,

What blades67 says is true. If you do make a mistake, it will cost you twice. Something to think about. That said, I can tell you that I am not a gunsmith. Like you, I'm handy, and have been working on cars for a long time. I decided to do the work myself. It's a relatively simple job, and if you did have to call in the cavalry (gunsmith), it still shouldn't be that expensive for him to clean up after you. :) There are directions posted at:
http://www.recguns.com/IIIC2q1.html

If for some reason you can't access them, I'd be happy to mail to you a hard copy of the directions I have. What I did was find these directions some time ago during a search. I printed them, then read them in detail. From what I read, it didn't seem like the job was beyond my capabilities. Sure enough, it wasn't. I've done two of them. If memory serves, it took me 30 to 40 minutes to do the first one, and about 15 to 20 for the second.

It's not really that difficult, but only you can decide if you really want to tackle it. You do have to be careful not to mis-position or bend a couple of springs, and if you have a short memory like me, make sure to note how each item should be positioned for reassembly. :) Hope that helps.

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Regards - AZFred