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View Full Version : Ted Williams Mod.300 Takedown?


MUZZLELOADER.45
October 10, 2005, 05:40 PM
My Nephew Got An Old T.williams Mod. 300 Semi. Shotgun. He Wanted Me To Help To Remove The Barrel For Cleaning. I Removed The End Cap And The Forend Came Loose About 1/2". It Then Tightened Up. The Barrel Also Loosened Up The Same Amount. He Said That When He Shot It The Forend Also Moved Then. Is There A Trick To Take Down This Shotgun??? Any Help???

Toney
October 16, 2005, 04:47 PM
I bought an old ted williams outboard motor last winter
still looked new. It's a 1956 mod.

Any body now who ted was? I know the stuff came from
sears You know we called them about the motor and
they still had parts.

You might call sears ???

Is the bolt closed, the lugs holding the barrel

Dfariswheel
October 16, 2005, 06:53 PM
The Ted Williams/Sears Model 300 is actually the Winchester Model 1400.

Here's a link to an online owner's manual on the Winchester 1400/1500 guns.

http://www.stevespages.com/page7b.htm

beenthere
October 19, 2005, 12:15 AM
It surprised me a bit to see your question. Really shows my age.

Ted was the last Major League Baseball player to hit over .400 for an entire season. In addition he was a war hero fighter pilot in WW2 and was called up again for the Korean War (Police Action). In addition to his remarkable baseball record he was a noted sportsman in other fields. Fishing, both freshwater flyfishing and deep ocean fishing. Hunting was mainly pheasant and quail and partridge as I recall.

Nickname - The Splendid Splinter. He and Stan Musial were the two who battered the record books in that era. Musial in the National League for the St. Louis Cardinals and Williams for the Boston Redsox in the American League.

Because Williams was recognized as a superlative sportsman in several areas and his name was universally recognized in those sports Sears Roebuck (Now Sears) hired him and used his name on their top of the line sporting goods.

There ar several books availabout both Williams and Musial in most well stocked libraries.

Probably more than you ever wanted to know about him but he was to baseball and all around sports what Elmer Kieth, Ad Topperwein and Ed Mcgivern were to an era of handgun shooters.