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'75Scout
August 27, 2005, 06:36 PM
What type of shells will damage a shotgun equipped with a screw-in choke. Are any type of slugs safe and does any buckshot damage them?

redranger1
August 27, 2005, 07:11 PM
i wouldnt be afraid to shoot any kind of lead birdshot through any choke, but i wouldnt try to squeeze off very big buckshot through a very tight choke. besides, that is close range ammo so ya dont want a tight choke. and id only shoot a slug through a cyl. bore choke. also, any shot that is not lead a guy might not want to shoot as tight as he would lead shot. the lead will give a lil, the rest wont as easily.

mathman
August 27, 2005, 07:12 PM
If you use slugs in a full choke (or maybe even modified) you can damage your choke/gun.

And I second everything that redranger1 said.

Dfariswheel
August 27, 2005, 08:15 PM
The truth is, you can shoot ANY STANDARD shot, buckshot, or slug, through ANY STANDARD choke from Cylinder to Full.

No maker of guns or ammo in their right mind is going to market something that would be dangerous with factory ammo or factory guns.

Where things do get iffy is when you shoot slugs through MORE than Full chokes.
These are non-standard Extra-Full or super tight chokes used for special purposes like shooting match guns.

As long as the choke is no tighter than a standard factory Full, you can shoot any factory load of ammo.

'75Scout
August 27, 2005, 11:07 PM
Is improved cylinder good for buckshot. Mostly for HD.

Dfariswheel
August 28, 2005, 12:32 AM
Many shotgun makers, including Remington are now using the Improved Cylinder for buckshot and slugs.

Remington uses the Improved Cylinder on their Police guns, because they say it shoots tighter buckshot patterns and slug groups than the Cylinder bore they used to use.

What's important is to actually shoot a variety of shells at a patterning board to determine what works best in your specific gun.

Remember, for actual HD (Inside the home) shotguns you may not want a tighter pattern.
The typical house has a maximum distance possible of around 30 feet, an apartment around 20 feet.

A good rule of thumb on shotguns is: The shot will spread "About" 1 inch per yard.

In other words at 6 yards (18 feet) you'll get a circle about 6-7 inches in diameter.
That's not that big.

In my case, since my 870 Police is a REAL HD Inside the house gun, I opened the choke from Improved Cylinder to an actual straight Cylinder bore.
I want a more open spread, not a tighter pattern.

mathman
August 28, 2005, 10:52 AM
In my case, since my 870 Police is a REAL HD Inside the house gun, I opened the choke from Improved Cylinder to an actual straight Cylinder bore.

How did you do that? Did you have a gunsmith do it?...I'm curious.

Dfariswheel
August 28, 2005, 02:21 PM
In my case, I used a borrowed shotgun bore hone from my old shop-mate.

You can do the same....CAREFULLY by making up a dowel rod with a split end.

Chuck the dowel in a drill, and wrap metal-type sand cloth around the dowel, using the split to hold it.

CAREFULLY use this to remove the choke, then use finer and finer grades of sand cloth to restore the shine.

You run the drill at medium speed, and keep the dowel constantly moving up and down the muzzle area where the choke constriction is.

Check often with a micrometer to determine when the choke is gone.

Better yet, take it to a good gunsmith and let him do it.
Less chance of damaging an expensive barrel.

redranger1
August 28, 2005, 02:28 PM
"Better yet, take it to a good gunsmith and let him do it.
Less chance of damaging an expensive barrel."


or best yet, have screw in chokes put in so it is way more versatile and it will cost bout the same minus the cost of the chokes.