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boogeyman
July 18, 2005, 08:37 AM
i am really interested in competition shooting and have a few questions about ssp. first off, are there a fairly wide variety of pistols being shot in ssp, at local matches (not tournaments), or is it mostly glocks? second question, do you think that i could still have fun using a sig 239 or is that too small of a gun to reasonably compete with? i'm not looking to win or anything like that, i'm getting my ccw soon and thought it might be good to have some "reality" training and the ssp class seemed like it would be a moderately cheap way to gain more knowledge. what are your thoughts?

Old Shooter
July 18, 2005, 03:05 PM
Glock sure is the predominant gun in SSP at the 2 clubs I shoot at. I would shoot the gun you've got and have fun. If, after a few matches, it gets under your skin and you really want to compete - then you'll have some experience and a better knowledge of what might work for you.

I shot for about 6 or 7 monthts with different guns until I settled on a S&W 1911 for CDP. That was far from my original choice going into the sport.

Jim Watson
July 18, 2005, 03:07 PM
Glock is in the majority of IDPA SSP entries... and winners. I am stubborn enough to have shot a CZ75 for two seasons and will be working with a P226 the next time the SSP bug bites.
But if you want to exercise your carry pistol of some other make and model, there is a fair amount of that going on, too.
A P239 will cost you an extra reload every once in a while vs 10+1 guns, but will otherwise do just fine.

You need gun, at least three magazines, strong side belt, paddle, or IWB holster, mag carrier or carriers for two magazines, ammo, eye and ear protection, and a concealment garment to cover the rig as worn. Check the rules at www.idpa.com for holster requirements, they don't have an approved list any more, just a set of criteria.

DT Guy
July 18, 2005, 06:26 PM
Glocks are popular in IDPA, but that's largely because they're just plain popular.

That said, our last match was won 'overall' (I know, I know...) by a Sig shooter.


It's the indian....


Larry

RickB
July 20, 2005, 11:53 AM
Shoot whatever you have. In ESP, I've shot a wimpy-loaded .38 Super, a Browning Hi-Power, and a Delta Elite with full-power ammo. Each has its charms. I got pretty good in CDP with a full-size 1911, but this year I've been shooting a Detonics Combat Master, loaded 6+1, and am having a ball. The most important thing is to get out and shoot. A lot of people don't give their carry gun much thought, other than how it immediately strikes them when they hold it or sight down the top (wow, that's comfortable, and I like those 3-dots sights . . . not!). Actually shooting the gun under dynamic conditions can teach you a lot about your gun and how it suits you. The Detonics is my carry gun, but until I shot it at matches, I didn't realize the slide didn't always lock back, or that my standard grip allowed my thumb to ride the slide and cause malfunctions. After a half-dozen matches, I'm holding the gun differently, and have modified my mags - things that I may have never realized needed attention, otherwise. People will say IDPA is a game, and don't try to use it as "training", etc., but it is good trigger time, under conditions you won't face at the bowling alley-style range where most people shoot.

seanc9030
July 31, 2005, 09:55 PM
I have to agreee with RickB. I shoot a Trophy Mathc Springfield in IDPA, and I beat out all the Glock guys and ended up winning this weekend, even though I have to do an extra reload most of the time because our mathces are skewed to SSP and ESP guys....but I still managed to kick their asses with my little 1911...That being said, I will surely come in last next weekend since I just jinxed myself.
Consitency is the key....even if you have 11 rounds vs. 9 to start, you still need to worry about your reloads and target management. And like Rick said, having fun is the key....we had a guy come out and shoot a revolver a couple of weeks ago, and it was pretty neat. He knew he was too handicapped to actually win, but he had a blast, and that is what it is all about.