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Buzzkill
June 25, 2005, 12:40 PM
Hi all

I was just wondering does anyone hunt feral goat in the states or is there feral goat in the states, just never heard it mentioned on this forum.

Besides deer feral goat are the only other {big game} in Ireland .

Thanks
Bob

butch50
June 25, 2005, 02:31 PM
I think I remember reading that feral goats may be a problem in some part of Hawaii, but I haven't run across any other references.

Odd though that they aren't all over the place when you think about it, lots of goat farms and they should be able to get loose enough to go feral, and here in Texas they would be able to live wild as easily as deer do. Never heard of or seen one, though.

mete
June 25, 2005, 04:55 PM
Catalina island off CA .The Spanish put goats there so passing sailers could have fresh meat.I don't know if they are hunted.

racinstylez
June 25, 2005, 04:57 PM
never hunted goat before.

Mannlicher
June 25, 2005, 06:00 PM
you will run into some feral goats in SW Virginia, NC or Tennessee.

CarbineCaleb
June 25, 2005, 06:07 PM
http://www.nps.gov/mora/ncrd/images/goat.jpg

mtnbkr
June 25, 2005, 09:11 PM
you will run into some feral goats in SW Virginia, NC or Tennessee.
I've spent quite a bit of time in those areas and have never seen a feral goat. I hunt every fall in SW Virginia. I've biked the mountains of all three states. I've run into plenty bears, some bobcat, coyotes, and seen sign that might've been couger/mtn lion, and untold deer, but no goats.

Chris

Art Eatman
June 25, 2005, 10:04 PM
In south Brewster County in Texas, it's not uncommon for goats to get away from their keepers. However, they don't last long, as the mountain lions figure a goat is an easily-caught yummy-tasty...

:), Art

sm
June 25, 2005, 11:04 PM
Used to be quite a few on Harry Hines Blvd in Dallas...don't 'spect much has changed over the years...

Capt Charlie
June 25, 2005, 11:09 PM
I've seen a bunch here. They were old though. Saw 'em at the Senior's center. Hey, they were a wild bunch! :rolleyes: :D :D

butch50
June 26, 2005, 09:26 AM
On Harry Hines - ROFL :) I saw some there the other day, they still roam free!

Long Path
June 26, 2005, 10:18 AM
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=13613&stc=1
Lewis & Clark ran across these a little over 2 centuries ago, and Meriweather Lewis, a naturalist trained by Thomas Jefferson, immediately correctly classified them as goats. For some odd reason, we've always incorrectly called 'em "antelope" -- Pronghorn Antelope, to be [im]precise. They range from west Texas to Nevada to Montana, and are not just feral-- they're wild.

September 14, 1804 Killed a Buck Goat of this countrey, his eyes like a sheep- he is more like the Antilope or Gazella of Africa than any other species of Goat.
For all his correct identification of the taxonomy of the creature, Lewis fell into calling it an antelope himself pretty soon:
September 17, 1804
Having for many days past confined myself to the boat, I determined to devote this day to amuse myself on shore with my gun and view the interior of the country lying between the river and the Corvus Creek. This senery already rich pleasing and beatiful was still farther hightened by immence herds of Buffaloe, deer Elk and Antelopes which we saw in every direction feeding on the hills and plains.
http://lewisandclarktrail.com/section2/sdcities/Chamberlain/history1.htm

Dadgum, what a time to live...

mete
June 26, 2005, 11:35 AM
The scientific name is antelo-capra [antelope-goat ] because they couldn't decide which it was. It is in fact a distinct animal ,neither antelope or goat and should be referred to as American Pronghorn.

Greybeard
June 26, 2005, 10:04 PM
Quote: "here in Texas they would be able to live wild as easily as deer do. Never heard of or seen one, though."

A buddy and I saw one last year while hog huntin' at Caddo National Grasslands (near Red River). It still had an ear tag, so was not too "feral". When we asked the park ranger about it, he said yea, there were at least 3 or 4 of 'em, one that just had a kid. And to leave 'em alone. ;)

wyrdone
June 27, 2005, 10:08 PM
mtnbkr: There is a herd of 15-25 of wild goats that live along the New River. I see them all the time on a rock overlook near the New River Junction. However I am not sure if that is private land or National Forest.

Double Naught Spy
June 27, 2005, 11:22 PM
CarbineCaleb, the pic you posted was of a mountain goat, Oreamnos americanus. These are considered as natural and indigenous. Mountain goats are in the same family as domesticated (now feral) goats as are sheep, cattle, bison, etc. Feral most often refers to those animals that have become domesticated and that have then returned to the wild in some manner, often in places where they are not indigenous. For example, the domesticated pig common to farms here in the US are the species Sus scrofa. They are said to be feral when they have gotten loose and then returned to their pre-domestication behaviors in the wild. There are many examples such as feral dogs and cats, for example.

In relation to BuzzKill's query and mention of feral goats in Ireland, those goats were domesticated, taken to Ireland, and are now considered feral because of their return to the wild.

Lewis & Clark ran across these a little over 2 centuries ago, and Meriweather Lewis, a naturalist trained by Thomas Jefferson, immediately correctly classified them as goats. For some odd reason, we've always incorrectly called 'em "antelope" -- Pronghorn Antelope, to be [im]precise. They range from west Texas to Nevada to Montana, and are not just feral-- they're wild.

Long Path, pronghorn antelope most definitely not goats. Lewis' identification was in error. You are correct in that they are not true antelope. Then again, pandas are not bears either. The name assigned to antelope pertains to resembling antelope, not being antelope, as with the pandas. Pandas are in the raccoon family (Procyonidae) and not the bear family (Ursidae). American Antelope are in the family Antelocapridae. True antelope are in the family Bovidae along with sheep, goats, cattle, bison, etc.

Pronghorn are unique and are the sole surviving member of an ancient family dating
back 20 million years. They are set apart from goats and other bovids quite readily as the Pronghorn is the only animal in the world with branched horns (not antlers)
and the only animal in the world to shed its horns, as if they were antlers.

Ord classified and scientifically described pronghorn in 1815.

Lewis may have been trained by Jefferson, but neither had the fossil record information to trace the evolutionary ancestry of the pronghorn and bovids to know if they belonged together or not.

mtnbkr
June 28, 2005, 05:54 AM
mtnbkr: There is a herd of 15-25 of wild goats that live along the New River. I see them all the time on a rock overlook near the New River Junction. However I am not sure if that is private land or National Forest.
Cool. My parents and my wife's parents live in Roanoke. I've been spending time in the area for the past 15 years. This is the first I've heard of them (the goats ;) ).

Chris

NRA4life
June 28, 2005, 01:17 PM
Someone mentioned it before, but there are feral goats in Hawaii, I know for sure they are on the Island of Kauai. And there is a hunting season for them. Trying to convince Mrs. HUNT4LIFE to go goat hunting whilst on Kauai turned out to be a wee bit of a stretch though. I believe most are in the Waimea Canyon area on the Southwest (dry side) part of the island.

See them here:

http://www.roddyscheer.com/feral_goats.html

They're kind of goony looking.

jonathon
June 28, 2005, 02:01 PM
Goat hunting sounds like fun if the goats are as dumb as the ones people own around here ;)

STITCH
June 28, 2005, 02:39 PM
We have an island in the St.Johns river that is rightfuly named "Goat Island"
The story is that a family lived there on the island and they populated it with goats, well the army core of engineers decided to split the island in two so the river could be dreged for the building of the Dames Point Bridge. The family left but the goats stayed. There are quite a few of them still on the island. I dont know if they can be considered feral or not, but they are there.

claude783
June 30, 2005, 09:43 PM
In all the time I have spent in the Mohave Desert, I have seen 4 desert big horn...since (they say) there are only 200 left in the desert they are protected. (and rightly so)

Buzzkill
July 2, 2005, 12:35 PM
Thanks for the posts guys .

I never knew there was so many diferen tspecies of wild goat .

The only wild goat in Ireland is goats who have escapen from farms

Thanks
Bob

GLK
July 13, 2005, 09:23 PM
It is post like this one and all the replies that make this site one of my favorites to visit. One can learn something new everyday if he or she keeps their eyes open. My apolgies for hijacking the thread a bit, and though I am not familiar with feral goats(until tonight) on the Hawaiian islands I have watched a show where the guide and client were actually hunting cattle/bison/buffalos????. These critters were wild and if I recall correctly the bulls were more than willing to attack you before you could attack them if given the chance. I am not joking either these things were bada$$es. For some reason I really thing these were some sort of feral cattle breed. Can anyone fill in the blanks (DoubleNaughtSpy) for me?

zeisloft
July 14, 2005, 12:50 PM
We hunt em in west TX. A friends family had a bunch get out 10 or so yrs ago, so did neighbors. Years of freedom and cross breeding but most retain breed characteristics. We mostly see Boar and Spanish but there is some Angora. They are extreemly whiley and a good challenge.
~z

NRA4life
July 14, 2005, 01:31 PM
GLK,

You are correct. If I remember, the wild cattle in Hawaii were brought there in the late 1700's by either Cook or Vancouver, don't remember which. They were gifts for King Kamehameha. I too saw a hunting show on them one time, maybe 10 years ago. The beasts were enormous too.

butch50
July 14, 2005, 06:42 PM
I used to hunt in the Big Thicket area in SE Texas - there were feral cattle in there, supremely wild and the bulls were very agressive. We could have killed them, but we never did, it just didn't seem right for some reason.

Can you imagine what it must have been like to run afoul of one of the wild longhorns back in the day? There are several places around here that have longhorn cattle and when you see one of those monsters you develop an instant and genuine respect for the cowboys who rounded up wild ones and drove them to Kansas. Those were MEN!

Capt Charlie
July 14, 2005, 10:49 PM
Hey Butch50! Back in the late 70's, I did a 6 month stint at Big Thicket as a park ranger. NPS transfered me there temporarily for a manpower shortage. As I remember, NPS wasn't real popular around there then. They established it as a preserve for the Red Wolf, and later found out they were a day late and a dollar short. The Red Wolf was already extinct in the wild by then :rolleyes: . I lived in Woodville, in Tyler County, and worked the Big Sandy area. Just wondering what it looks like today.

butch50
July 15, 2005, 07:30 PM
As I recall where we hunted was not too far from woodville, near a historic place called Fort Teran where the Mexican had a fort on the river. I think it was the Mexicans. Do you know the place?

This would have been in the 77 to 80 era. Believe it or not but there was at least one Red Wolf still in there then, we saw his tracks several times and then one foggy morning we saw him standing in a logging road. Magnificent. I had no idea that there had been a program to help them out. None of us ever thought of trying to hunt him, he was way too cool.

At the time that we were there it was of course thick pine forest with the occasional meadow and some clear cut areas. The fire ants had moved in real bad though and became so bad that you almost couldn't sit down anywhere. Feral hogs were just getting started good in there too. We saw a few but not many, but I bet they got real thick in there later.

drinks
July 15, 2005, 10:48 PM
I live in the northern part of the Big Thicket, still pretty big and definately thick, parts of my 2.5 acres are still to thick for me to get into, and I like it that way.
Feral hogs and fire ants are in control of much of the country, do not even think of sitting on the ground, carry a shooting stick or 5 gal. bucket with a swivel seat to still hunt, feral hogs are tearing up much of Texas, places such as Aransas Wildlife refuge , a beach sand overgrown with brush area, appear to be a testing ground for 2' wide bulldozers , some ruts are 18" deep, if the 12-14' gators did not take a few and there was not a short bow season, the place would likely have disappeared by now, just plowed under.
Don :rolleyes:

lrglnman
July 16, 2005, 10:03 AM
There is some ferel goats in Tennessee around the Center Hill lake area. This is about 60 miles east of Nashville on I40. There use to be a heard of goats in the north part of Putnam county where Putnam, Jackson, and Overton counties meet. :)

Art Eatman
July 18, 2005, 10:39 PM
thread drift: I haven't seen anything on it for some years, now, but there were feral cattle in the cane brakes of the lower Rio Grande. Ranch hands trying work cattle from horseback in there were charged by bulls. One article claimed a bull even charged a pickup truck. There was mention of hunting, using cartridges typical of Africa. That's sensible; even a ton of Hereford can be hard on a fella...

Art

Vermin
August 1, 2005, 06:34 AM
I don't know about the USA but there are thousands of feral goats in Australia, they are really good to hunt.