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Denny Hansen
November 10, 2004, 02:02 PM
At the risk of sounding like I’m just bashing the competition, the main difference between S.W.A.T.. and other publications is the credibility/experience of the authors who write for us. The hostage taking incident that took place at the Mexican Consulate yesterday (11/9/04) is a good example.

An LAPD Metro sergeant ended the incident with a single shot from a .223 to the hostage-takers brain housing group. Veteran LAPD officer and S.W.A.T. staff writer Scott Reitz trained the sergeant.

I can’t begin to express how proud I am to be associated with the likes of Scott, Pat, Louis, Clint, Jeff and the other professionals who take time off from their real jobs to write for S.W.A.T.

Denny

garrettwc
November 10, 2004, 10:52 PM
At the risk of sounding like I’m just bashing the competition, the main difference between S.W.A.T.. and other publications is the credibility/experience of the authors who write for us.

It ain't bashing if you can do it.

The only thing I will add is that even the best team is useless without a dedicated leader. And SWAT is fortunate to have a great one.

Please accept my humble thanks oh great editor guru. Keep up the good work.

Denny Hansen
November 11, 2004, 11:42 AM
Update from Scotty:
Initial information was that the bad guy was taken out with a .223. Turns out it was a single shot from a .45.

Denny

KSFreeman
November 11, 2004, 12:22 PM
Wow! Looked like a long shot as well? Or, as we would sometimes say here, "a fur peace." :D

Stressed, excited, people yelling, confusion, probably holding on him a while, that's a well-trained man! :cool:

Denny Hansen
November 11, 2004, 01:22 PM
Yep. Well-trained saved the day. Or, as Pat Rogers says, "In a time of crisis one will not rise to the occasion, but default to the level of his training."

After the above case is fully adjudicated, I'll try and get Scotty to write it up for his Frontline Debriefs column.

Denny

C_Yeager
November 12, 2004, 03:56 AM
From seeing it on TV it was a damn fine shot.

More important than the marksmanship itself is that the had the CONFIDENCE in his training to even take the shot, not many men would in that situation. That speaks volumes as to the quality of training that he recieved as well as his own ability and decisiveness.

Kirk Keller
November 12, 2004, 10:15 AM
Denny and crew, as always love the mag. Well done and getting better all the time.

Phil306
November 12, 2004, 02:03 PM
If you have ever taken a course from Scott, you know he spends alot of time working on hostage targets and moving targets. Also his knife attack system. Generally speaking, he doesn't "waste" alot of time on BS which does not work.

As Denny said about writers, I will say about trainers. I used to go to everyone under the sun. Now, I have it narrowed down to a small hand full. And Scott is at the top of that hand full.

Thin The Herd

CAGoatee
December 2, 2004, 09:04 PM
Yep. Well-trained saved the day. Or, as Pat Rogers says, "In a time of crisis one will not rise to the occasion, but default to the level of his training."


Denny,

You are dead-bang accurate on that one!

There is an old sports adage - which I have never forgotten - that fits in quite nicely with the Pat Rogers quote, i.e., "How you train is how you will play".

Happy Holidays, stay safe, and have fun shooting. :)

RWK
December 3, 2004, 01:22 AM
"In a time of crisis one will not rise to the occasion, but default to the level of his training."

Truer words have NEVER been said.

Spectre
December 21, 2004, 11:35 PM
the main difference between S.W.A.T.. and other publications is the credibility/experience of the authors who write for us

I think this is usually the case, but one of the last issues I read showed some HTH stuff, and one of the illustrations showed a guy getting whacked in the arm with a stick, with the notation that the blow would probably shatter the bones. I call bull****.

ASP claims that its batons have never broken bones when used in a similar fashion, and the ASP baton is denser than the stick illustrated. I have engaged in stick training for years, and I have never heard similar claims for such a strike from teachers I respect. I am angry that nonsense like this slipped past editorial censure.

Denny, I have the utmost respect for you. Please keep SWAT the sterling magazine I'm eager to go to for factual information.

John R. Shirley

Denny Hansen
December 22, 2004, 12:29 PM
Thanks for your input, John. My experience with stick fighting is limited mainly to a 24" straight and side-handle batons. I don't know if folks who engage in stick training pad up and if so to what extent. Also don't know if ya'll go at it full force with the adenaline overload that kicks in during a real fight.

I can say that the raduis and ulna bones are not particulary stong and often times when one is broken both are. Your training in this area is obviously more intense than mine, and you have every right to call bull based on your experience. However, I have personally seen the forearm of one bad guy (who came at a fellow deputy with a broken bottle) broken with a 24" straight baton--roughly the same diameter and density as a fighting cane.

Denny

Spectre
December 22, 2004, 10:58 PM
I have personally seen the forearm of one bad guy...broken with a 24" straight baton

Always nice to have first-hand feedback. :) (The deputy in question was unharmed, I hope?) I believe that it's unreasonable to expect to break the bones of an adversary's moving limb in the direction shown, but of course, almost anything is possible.

John

CAPTAIN MIKE
February 2, 2005, 06:54 PM
Denny hits the nail on the head. Or should I say "brain housing group"? SWAT is a top notch magazine and Denny helps keep it that way.

P.S. Denny, we'd love to see a story on the upcoming 3-Gun National Championship this October in Las Vegas.

Denny Hansen
February 2, 2005, 06:58 PM
Cap'n,
Had not heard about it. Give me more details via mail: denny@swatmag.com

Denny

Brit
February 3, 2005, 07:13 AM
(The deputy in question was unharmed, I hope?)

If you have a baton in hand, gun isen't! and to strike with what is already in this hand is much faster than any drop and go for your side arm.

Having said that!! A vee shaped hair style would be my first thought!
What ever worked can't be beat either!

leadbutt
February 3, 2005, 02:46 PM
Denny, that didn't even make the news East coast side ,here in my area,, sounds like he learned his lessons well and put them to good use.. Hope there were no others harm by the HT.

Oh by the by great magazine

Denny Hansen
February 3, 2005, 03:42 PM
No, the deputy was not hurt. Acutally the incident happened long ago--in '83 I think--just before my department switched from straight batons to side handles.

Denny