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chipper
October 6, 2002, 01:07 AM
I'm looking to get into trap shooting after being away from the sport for twenty years. I want to purchase a new shotgun either a pump or autoloader and want to stay under $700.00. Any suggestions as to brands, bbl length, ect. Thanks:confused:

bamf
October 6, 2002, 02:26 AM
For a pump I'd suggest the good old Remington 870, if you're willing to spend up to $700, I'd get a really nice wingmaster not the lower grade express.

For an autoloader, I'd look into a Beretta 390 (if you can find one) or the 391. Excellent auto, extremely reliable been seeing more and more of them on the clay fields.

For trap, you want a long barrel, at least 30in, 32in would be better. A high rib and/or monte carlo stock would be helpful.

If you want a good all around barrel, good for skeet, trap or sporting, 28in would be ideal.

Suggestions are great but really go out and try some of these shotguns and see what fits you the best, that should really be the determining factor.

HTH

-Dan

S.F.S
October 6, 2002, 06:30 AM
I don't mean to interupt this thread but why is a longer barrel better for these games? What is the advantage of say a 28" barrel versus a 23" barrel as long as your comfortable with the shorter one and you can follow through with it and all?

Thanks,
Scott

Dave McC
October 6, 2002, 09:22 AM
Chip, there's a lot of T grade 870s out there at reasonable prices. I paid $375 for mine, and have seen good'uns go for less.

Some trapshooters say the 870 kicks too much for them. Good stock fit and adding some weight will eliminate probs. Check the Archives for tips there.

Longer bbls help move the balance point forward, thus aiding the swing's continuity. Moving the muzzle a little further out also reduces the blast.

HSMITH
October 6, 2002, 07:26 PM
SFS, you have a good point. There is no advantage to a longer barrel IF you use good form and follow through. That said I have never met a shotgun barrel that was too long for me to shoot. I like the fluidity and deliberate swing of a longer barrel. For skeet and sporting I like 30" doubles and 28" pumps and autos. For hunting a longer barrel would be nice, but is hard to find.

For trap I would suggest a good quality 30" AUTO. The reduction in felt recoil makes a world of difference given most trapshooters' propensity for loads WAY stouter than prudent given the target. The modern crop of autos, ala the Browning Gold/Beretta 390 series/Win SuperX2 etc, are extremely reliable, balance and handle extremely well, last forever and shoot softer. Get a shell catcher for it and where is the loss by shooting an auto? Soft recoil means more meaningful practice is possible, and scores will show it.

The only thing I think is a real advantage on a shotgun for trap that is not needed for anything else in the shotgun world is a gun with a point of impact that is at least 60/40, and up to 80/20 works really well for me. What I mean is that the pattern has 60% of its distribution above the point of aim and 40% below, same for the other figures. Not having to cover the target with the barrel is a tremendous advantage if the wind is blowing and lessens the importance of timing in your shooting. I have fitted ALL of my shotgins to shoot 70/30 to 80/20, even my field guns and have noticed a marked gain in hits.

Hope this helps.

chipper
October 6, 2002, 10:49 PM
Thanks guys. Your suggestions were just what I was looking for. Tonight I saw a Beretta 390 at Wally World for $530.00. I may take a closer look at it.

C.R.Sam
October 7, 2002, 12:19 AM
Gun fit, shooter form, ammo compatability...
All else is bells n whistles.

Sam

CMichael
October 7, 2002, 08:59 AM
SFS the advantage of a longer barrell is that it's easier to align the beads and hit the target.

I have a Mossberg Persuader 20" barrell and I bought the optional 28" barrell for trap.

Michael

S.F.S
October 7, 2002, 01:28 PM
Thanks for clearing that up for me..