PDA

View Full Version : Which is better in an Airplane, aisle or window seat?


ThePatriot29
June 28, 2002, 07:15 PM
From a self defense position, which is a better seat on a plane, the window or aisle?

KSFreeman
June 28, 2002, 07:32 PM
Aisle that way I can more easily strike up a conversation with a young and nubile flight attendant.

Oh, self-defense, I would presuppose the aisle as well. More freedom of action.

Hkmp5sd
June 28, 2002, 09:50 PM
Depends. For comfort, the aisle seat is beneficial as you don't have to climb over people to go to the restroom. If you can go 10 hours without using the restroom, then the window seat is better because people are not climbing over YOU to get to the restroom.:)

For strictly self defense, aisle seat. More freedom of movement. That's why hijackers used to make male passengers move to the windows and women and children move to the aisle seats.

Erich
June 29, 2002, 09:40 AM
Aisle for me, since I've been a grown up.

How could the window seat possibly be a good thing for self defense, comfort, or convincing a foxy female stew to induct you into the Mile High Club?

C.R.Sam
June 29, 2002, 11:06 AM
Second choice.....Aisle
First choice.....Flight Deck.

Sam

D.W. Drang
July 1, 2002, 12:39 PM
For years the conventional wisdom was that, in case of a hijacking, you were saferin a window seat, because it would be less conveniant for the goblins to pick on you.

I think this was based more on the "Take me to Havana" type hijacking, though, than the "Give us all the passports so we can choose out GIs and Jews to slaughter for CNN" type, though. (Sorry, I was reading again about the murder of Robert Stethem last night...)

You do certainly have more room to maneuver in the aisle seat. You are also an easier target.

CWL
July 1, 2002, 12:45 PM
You have a higher probability of developing blood clots in your legs from confined seating than from terrorist assault.

Aisle seating will let you move around a little better.

In case of an onboard situation, do you really want to be stuck in the window, center seat and completely unable to move? At least you have some options when seated in aisle.

Better yet, go for business/first class.

CMichael
July 3, 2002, 12:25 PM
window: That way you can open the window and climb out :D

Christopher II
July 3, 2002, 02:53 PM
CMike makes a good point, maybe without meaning to.

Whenever I used to fly, I would always request an exit row seat. If you book far enough in advance, the airlines never gave me a problem about it.

My reasoning went along the lines of, "If something does happen, I don't want to have to wait for the guy in the exit row, who had five vodka gimlets in the departure lounge and slept thru the safety brief, to fumble the exit open."

The extra foot of legroom doesn't hurt, either! And right above the wings is the best place to be in the event of a rough landing.

- Chris

LetsFetz
July 3, 2002, 03:17 PM
hmmm :rolleyes:

... in any case I go with George Carlin: "I'm gonna get IN the plane - let Evel Knevel get ON the plane" :D

Fraser
July 12, 2002, 07:29 PM
Aisle, preferably on a row with an emergency exit. In any case, no more than 3 rows from an emergency exit.

streetpro
July 12, 2002, 11:32 PM
<<From a self defense position, which is a better seat on a plane, the window or aisle?>>







Ejection Seat.

wingnutx
July 16, 2002, 03:42 PM
DOD training always tells us to sit by the window, so we're less likely to get dragged out and beaten to death. That may have had something to it when hijackings were going to end up on the tarmac with demands being met.

New paradigm is kill the hijackers, or else eat an A2A missile, or get used as a big bullet. I'd say this means the more capable passengers should be on the aisle.

I sit there anyway, cause it's comfy.


BTW, anyone have any good ideas for unasuming defensive weapons that will make it aboard an airplane? My personal favorite is a pair of socks and a couple of billiard balls, or something else small and hard. Can of spam, maybe.

Don Gwinn
July 16, 2002, 09:47 PM
Nowadays one or two billiard balls might even be hard to explain. Maybe if you had a box with a full set in your carryon?

I used to say I would put my glass-filled nylon knife in my shoe, flat on the sole. Now that wouldn't work in a lot of places since you have to take your shoes off. Thanks a lot, shoe bomber.

I'd definitely be sure I was wearing my good boots and my heavy belt, but that's about all I've got for you. That's why I finally had to go out and learn to throw a punch. ;)

FPrice
July 16, 2002, 10:02 PM
"That's why I finally had to go out and learn to throw a punch. "

Better yet, learn how to kick. You can do it from a slightly greater distance and cause the person to drop their guard, thereby making your punches more effective.

baldangel
July 16, 2002, 10:16 PM
Find where the fire extinguisher is stored and input it into your memory bank. It can be used as an impact weapon. Also locate where the "demo" seatbelts that the attendants use before takeoff and use that as a garrote or sling-type weapon. Shoestrings. A pair of socks with a full soda can inside. A blanket to cover the tangoes just before you pound them with the fire extinguisher. An ink pen or mechanical pencil.

SHIVAN
July 17, 2002, 01:03 PM
It can also be used as a shield against a box cutter, knife or other instrument of laceration.

CheapSeats
July 17, 2002, 01:11 PM
From a self defense position, which is a better seat on a plane, the window or aisle?

Think about that for a moment and it'll probably come to you.

I cannot think of any situation even coming close to have me choose a window seat.

Now UNDER the seat may be another story. :D