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S.F.S
May 26, 2002, 08:58 AM
Im looking for some info on this particular model shotgun, its a wood stock, ingraved receiver and chrome lined full choke barrel fires both 2 3/4 and 3" shells. Its in excellent condition its selling for $450.00 bought new in the 80's has had about 100 shells through it.

I dont know anything about this model so Im looking for info on it..


Scott

Art Eatman
May 26, 2002, 09:45 AM
So let us take foot in hand and hobble on over to the Shottygun Forum, okay?

:), Art

Chuck Graber
May 26, 2002, 05:39 PM
Scott,
The 302 was made from 1982-1987 and is a good solid gun. I would say that the guns is probably at the limit of the price range. I would expect that a good condition gun would go for more like $350-$400.

The only thing that I would warn you about is that since this gun has a 3" chamber it will very likely not cycle light target loads very well. It may handle 1oz. loads or not. It should work with 1-1/8oz. 3 dram loads all day long.

Replace the main spring about every 10k to 15K rounds and it should be rock solid. A good source for info and parts for these guns is Rich Cole. http://www.colegun.com/

Another good resource for these guns is Shotgun Report. http://www.shotgunreport.com/ Bruce Buck (aka the Technoid) is a long time Beretta 303 shooter and has a lot of good information available on these guns.

Chuck Graber

S.F.S
May 27, 2002, 08:15 AM
Chuck,
Is Cycling light loads a problem with all gas guns that are chambered for 2 3/4 and 3" shells?

I know a friend of mine has an 11-87SP, (I know its a totally different animal) that will cycle 1 oz. field loads all day long.. Is this a rare occurance?
Or is it just with older production gas guns...

Scott

Chuck Graber
May 27, 2002, 02:32 PM
Scott,
Many older gas guns chambered for 3" shells had problems handling light loads. There is a wide range of pressures between light target loads and heavy magnum loads. If the action is sensative enough to cycle with light target loads, a magnum shell will bash the action visiously. Much of this has to do with gas port size in the bottom of the barrel. To small and the gun won't cycle light loads. To large and it the gun will eventually bang itself to pieces.

Companies like Beretta, Remington and Browning eventually solved the problem with compensating valves that bleed of some of the excess presure on magnum loads. Most modern guns then have at least 3" chambers and are still able to cycle very light loads.

Chuck Graber

S.F.S
May 27, 2002, 04:45 PM
Chuck.
Thanks for the info. How will I know if the used gas gun Im looking at has a compensating valve or not?

Which models do and don't out of Remington, Beretta and Browning?

Chuck Graber
May 29, 2002, 10:15 PM
Scott,
In Beretta the 390 and 391 both have compensating valves. The Browning Gold models have compensating valves. I am not up on the Remington models but am told by a buddy that his 1100 will handle a wide range of shells. I don't believe that your buddies 11-87 is an odd-ball. I have not heard of modern Remingtons that would not handle most shells.

Chuck Graber