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ballistic gelatin
March 15, 2002, 09:57 PM
Can anyone tell me how to hunt armadillo's at night without disturbing neighbors? A guy who is a big shot at a Golf Course/Housing Community asked me if I know how to get rid of or new anyone who could get rid of armadillo's in their golf course. They want someone to come in and shoot them after dark. Will a regular rifle scope work on full moon nights or do I need a night vision scope? I would like to get a suppressed/silenced .22 rifle also. Does anyone have any advice/opinion on this matter?

I am sending in paperwork next week to become a State Licensed Nuisance Animal Trapper which will allow me to shoot/destroy armadillos legally. And a permit to hunt with a rifle and a light after dark is in the works too.

Art Eatman
March 16, 2002, 12:36 AM
A bolt action .22 with even just Shorts will work. High Speed Hollow Point LRs are better, but you'd have to check out the noise level. Long barrels are quieter than short barrels. A low-power scope is plenty good, along with something like a standard three-cell flashlight.

Armadillos are pretty easy to ease up to and get close. The key is walk softly and don't march along in hard-soled boots or waffle-stompers.

If you want a silenced rifle, hunt up a Class III dealer. They'll know all the drill on the paperwork. The Ruger 10/22 is a good way to go.

Art

ballistic gelatin
March 16, 2002, 11:21 AM
Hey Art, thanks for the advice...when you say "waffle-stompers" do you mean military issue type boots?

Low power scope is good enough. okay. How about that 3 cell flashlight? Are you using that for taking aim? I am concerned about the neighbors who's houses are dotted along the perimeter of the Golf Course seeing the light and becoming uneasy.

I was thinking about printing out some life-sized armadillo targets to practice on before hunting. I had planned on head shots so the little critters didn't run away. Is that an unrealistic idea?

I probably can't afford a suppressed rifle right now but do you prefer the 10/22 over a bolt action?

Thanks so much.

Art Eatman
March 16, 2002, 12:42 PM
"Waffle Stompers" is my generic name for any lugged or cleated sole. It's hard to walk quietly in them. Plus, they make a bit of vibration in the ground, which small critters can sense.

If snakes are a possible problem, I prefer a flat, crepe-soled Wellington boot over tenny-runners.

A long-barrelled .22 is pretty quiet, and they're more often found in a bolt-action. Most any old good-used rifle will do.

I just hold the flashlight alongside the forearm. I've added a cardboard tube around the front of the light, to avoid "splashback" of light into the scope.

It's best to inform adjacent residents, and the local police authority, as to what you're doing. Otherwise, somebody is gonna call 911 and you'll have all manner of problems. Certainly, let the PD know so the dispatcher can reassure the locals.

Head shot; heart shot. Armadillos die fairly easily. Penetration of the shell is easy, even for shorts.

Art

ballistic gelatin
March 16, 2002, 02:30 PM
It's best to inform adjacent residents, and the local police authority, as to what you're doing. Otherwise, somebody is gonna call 911 and you'll have all manner of problems. Certainly, let the PD know so the dispatcher can reassure the locals.

Thanks Art, good stuff. I definately plan on contacting the local LEO's. I will probably leave homeowner notification to the homeowners association. Property owners/golf course members, they know how to smooth those things over better than some Wildlife Trapper.

I really don't want this thing to go sour at any point.

Al Thompson
March 16, 2002, 07:54 PM
Be very carefull of what's behind your target. Richochets are troublesome.

I've wacked some 30 or 40 squirrels with a .22 loaded with CB ammo. Very good penetration and accuracy. You have to check and adjust your zero though.

ballistic gelatin
March 16, 2002, 09:15 PM
Hey Gizmo, I just bought a box of CB (CCI .22 shorts) today and plan on trying them out tomorrow afternoon. What can you tell me about your rifle model and the sound level.

Be very carefull of what's behind your target. Richochets are troublesome.

I plan on getting a map of the area with house positions and work out some safe firing lanes. Also will do some tests at the range to determine bullet's bounce at different angles.

Thanks everyone, keep feeding me info. I love it...just ask my wife. If she hears me clicking on the keyboard one more night after she turns out the lights, she'll probably go "ballistic" on me.

slick slidestop
March 16, 2002, 09:35 PM
Do like my dad and his buddy when they were in Med school.

Get drunk and when you see one, jump out of the car with a tire tool, when they go into their hole, grab them by the tail, pull them out, and beat them with the tire tool:D

Then bring them to the "poor part of town" and have an old timer cook them up for you.

It worked for them and you don't have to worry about your backstop.

Art Eatman
March 16, 2002, 09:45 PM
"Tastes like chicken." :D

A CB in a long-barrelled .22 is about like a hand-clap. I've done in a few squirrels in west Austin, with the neighbors none the wiser.

:), Art

Al Thompson
March 16, 2002, 09:46 PM
I usually run the CCI 22 CB Long rounds through my Remington 521. I've also used them in my Marlin 39 and Ruger 77/22 with great success. Each rifle required re-zeroing though.

Noise level is about like a loud hand clap.

Giz

ballistic gelatin
March 16, 2002, 09:53 PM
Doesn't Aguila make a .22 short with no powder, only the primer as propellant? Anybody ever try this stuff?

Zorro
March 16, 2002, 11:54 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/ptech/03/13/dangerous.passwords/index.html

Yes but a 300 FPS bullet does NOT penetrate most things.

C.R.Sam
March 17, 2002, 02:04 AM
Some thoughts re shootin on a golf course.
Most are surrounded by houses. Many of those houses contain people. some of those people tend to walk around a bit at night. .22 isn't considered to be all that much but any loading that would have a high probability of dispatching an armadiller has some chance of doin great harm to a person.

Carefull homework is in order.

Sam

Al Thompson
March 17, 2002, 07:48 AM
The Aguila stuff is ok for cans and birds up close, but is inhumane on anything bigger. I still have half a box of it.

Giz

Art Eatman
March 17, 2002, 08:43 AM
I think you're worrying unduly about the noise factor. Just a .22 of standard velocity won't be very loud.

Consider: These neighbors live in well-insulated houses, and until some hour have the TV blaring on some Prime Time Pap. They probably wouldn't hear a bomb go off, nor care so long as it didn't knock out their electricity.

Notification by the management of the golf course/club could not only mention "...to prevent damage to YOUR greens...", but "...in order to reduce the hazard of leprosy..."

You could also consider a .410 shotty-gun, with light loads.

:), Art

capnrik
March 17, 2002, 09:27 AM
Yeah, there you go. Or how about an M4 with a dozen thirty round mags? Heck that little .223 isn't nearly as loud as a .30-06! Night vision goggles, GPS to locate which hole you're on, and a VOX and headset equipped transceiver, in case you have to call for backup on a wounded killer diller?

Awright, awright, just kidding.:rolleyes:

H&H,hunter
March 17, 2002, 09:41 PM
As the shimmering heat waves gently caresed across the the green hills of Texas, I saw him. he had already seen me and when our eyes meet he had strange mixed angry expression on his face he looked at me as though I owed him money. And then he came in his peculiar wobbling gate he came and he came fast small red eyes focused on me as my .600 Nitro double gun came to shoulder, the thought of a tomb I'd just viewed at the local cemetary came to mind in everlasting wisdom it read "He tried to shoot one to many Armadillos".

And then I remebered, when hunting Armadillos alway, always use enough gun.

Faithfully submitted
H&Hhunter

Art Eatman
March 18, 2002, 12:09 AM
Yeah, H&H, it pays to be cautious.

The armadillo is the most ferocious creature in the U.S. Think for a moment: How many times have you seen one on his back in the middle of the highway, claws up, waiting to catch a car?

:), Art

capnrik
March 18, 2002, 12:20 PM
"...., claws up, waiting to catch a car?

, Art

:D :D :D :D All right Art, you owe me a cleanup on my monitor! Coffee everywhere, ROTFLMAO!

H&H,hunter
March 18, 2002, 07:03 PM
Hey you guys keep an eye out for my book "Dillo armored death in the short grass"

"Claws up waiting to catch a car":) :D

Yep that's a good one

KilgorII
March 18, 2002, 08:25 PM
Armadillos are stupid.

I'm surprised they haven't gone extinct.

They just shuffle along not caring about anything. I think you could have a battalion marching in lock step and they wouldn't know they were coming.

I came across an armadillo a few months ago and shot into the ground near it from a few feet away and it didn't even notice. Just kept digging around.

I shot one with a 7 1/2 shot 12 gauge at 30 yards and he rolled and kept going.

I also shot one at 3 yards with a rifled foster 12 gauge slug and lets just say he went in two different directions at the same time.

You can walk right up to an armadillo and giive him a shot in the head with a .22rf.

Kilgor

Zorro
March 19, 2002, 12:32 AM
Armadillo?

HA!

Beware or GOPHERS!

EVIL DIGGING GOPHERS!

:D

Navy joe
March 19, 2002, 08:19 AM
So here's my question. If I stuck an armadillo to my front bumper or was in some odd situation that made this plated possum look like food, what's the best way to handle and prepare one to mitigate leprosy and other health risks?

Art Eatman
March 19, 2002, 12:48 PM
If you have no open sores or cuts on your hands, no leprosy hazard. You could always wear those throwaway gloves, of course.

Otherwise, just use the same sharp knife you use on possum...

:), Art

Dave R
March 19, 2002, 12:53 PM
Back to the golf course...

If it is in city limits, will there be a legal problem with using a .22?

Would a .22 air rifle be more legal, and more sporting? If a .22 short will take 'em, I'm assuming a quality .22 air rifle will do the same. And local residents may be calmed by knowing its "just a pellet gun."

Crimper-D
March 21, 2002, 02:34 PM
So Thats how the little beggers survive Fire Ants:eek:
Eat one! :eek: Eat Possum!!:eek: :eek: Leprosey?!?!!! :barf: :barf: :barf:
I think all of this is an Anti-Texas Chamber of Commerce plot to discourage migration to Texas! It's Working! :p

Art Eatman
March 21, 2002, 04:11 PM
Most cities have "no shooting" ordinances, but exceptions are made for approved pest controls. The golf course folks are responsible for all actions on their property, so they should get whatever offical approval is needed...

Art

capnrik
March 21, 2002, 05:02 PM
it takes to eat an armadillo!

Art Eatman
March 22, 2002, 02:12 AM
I ain't heard the "official" version, and mine ain't suitable for a family publication...

:D, Art

1goodshot
March 22, 2002, 08:06 AM
Bow and arrow

capnrik
March 23, 2002, 10:35 AM
It takes two Aggies to eat an armadillo. They take turns. One eats while the other watches for cars. :D

HankB
March 25, 2002, 03:30 PM
A high-powered .177 air rifle - like, for example, an RWS M48 - will take an armadillo out to at least 20 or 25 yards. Just place your shot carefully. The .22 and .25 air rifles hit harder.

A .22 rimfire would be better. Fired from a longish barrel, a target-velocity (subsonic) .22 will hit harder than all but the most exotic air rifles, and still be rather quiet.

Most places, people won't even notice a single, distant "pop" in the middle of the night, so unless you unleash a regular fusillade, noise shouldn't be a factor.

I'd be very, very careful about local ordnances and very, Very, VERY careful about where the bullet ends up.

C.R.Sam
March 25, 2002, 11:46 PM
Tho armidillos have been helpful in Leporsy research, being the only animal that catches it, it is very unlikely that a human can catch leporsy from an armadillo. Would require a protracted period of intimate contact. Not even Texans are into long term relationships with 'dillos.

Sam

swampgator
March 30, 2002, 01:59 AM
"This permit does not authorize the use of a firearm in areas where such use is restricted by Florida Statute, city or county ordinance and does absolve the premitee from firearms safety responsibilities"

Note: The above in all caps on permit!

This is from a standard gun and light permit. Don't have a nuisance permit handy to compare. But I don't think they make any exceptions for nuisance removers. They want you to trap if possible, the exception being racoons. For some reason you can't transport a live racoon in Florida.

Ballistic,
What area have you put to a nuisance remover in? Being honest, if your in North Florida there really isn't much use for them. I probably only give out 3 removers per month. Most people take care of it themselves.

Central and South Florida are probably better bets, though. As far as what to use, some really good advice was given above. If firearms are legal for area, use the .22 with shorts, or CBs.

Armadillos are really, really easy to get close to. I kicked one in the rear once! Really wild watching him shag across the yard!

KilgorII
I also shot one at 3 yards with a rifled foster 12 gauge slug and lets just say he went in two different directions at the same time.

Armadillos on the half-shell? I did the same about a year ago! Talk about a mess!

We have a 400 acre farm and pretty much shoot on site policy, as they dig holes that can cause a cow to break a leg.

Art Eatman
March 30, 2002, 09:54 AM
swampgator: "And now for some thread-drift".

Cows break legs in diller holes?

I've read that about prairie dogs' holes. I've now read that about dem diggin' dillers.

Now, back in about 1939 my grandfather got back into the cow bidness outside of Austin. We had registered Herefords and dillers and skunks and plow horses. Nuthin' never broke nuthin' in no holes in the ground.

Another branch of the family ranched--and I still ranch--down below Cuero, Tayuxes. (Cuero is Spanish for hide or leather.) We got cows and dillers and skunks. Nuthin' never broke nuthin' in no holes in the ground.

It's possible for somebody on horseback to overcome the horse's sense of self-preservation and run him through holey ground. But during my years of being invisible, bulletproof, indestructible and King Of My World (age 9 - 15) I absolutely knew that the only speed for a horse was wide open run, run, run!

Working cattle put a fair amount of mesquite thorns in my legs, but no horse ever broke a leg in a diller home.

:D, Art

ballistic gelatin
March 30, 2002, 09:44 PM
Hey Swampgator, thanks for the input. I have a permit for Nuisance Animal Trapping and have the Night/Light application waiting to gain property owner approval. I still haven't received a green light from the Golf Course. I was under the impression that the local LEO's would make the call as to whether or not a firearm could be discharged within this "residential" area. The golf course is outside of city limits so I'm hoping they will approve. If they don't allow any firearms, I'll let you guys know and I probably won't take the job. The course is like an hour or so away from home. I don't really want to go over there everyday and empty one or two traps. I plan on using hi-power pellet rifles instead of .22 shorts. Some after dark testing I did last week proved positive for .22 short ricochets at different angles of fire. Probably use a combination of traps and pellets.

What area have you put to a nuisance remover in? Being honest, if your in North Florida there really isn't much use for them. I probably only give out 3 removers per month. Most people take care of it themselves.

Northeast Florida covering 3 counties. I only sent off for Nuisance Trapper permit so I could get the job at this golf course without breaking any "laws". If I happen to get one call per month in addition, that will probably be too much. Not to mention that I'm not exactly an experienced trapper. I ain't no city boy either. Grew up on 50 acres of swamp and garden and know a little bit about animal removal. Growing up with the nearest neighbor 1 mile away was great. There's nothing like being able to cruise the property with a .22 rifle and take a pee anywhere you want.

swampgator
March 31, 2002, 11:36 AM
Art,

True, I've never seen a cow or horse with a broken leg attributed to an armadillo, however I was always told that from the time I was knee high. I guess I just took it for gospel.


ballistic gelatin,

I was under the impression that the local LEO's would make the call as to whether or not a firearm could be discharged within this "residential" area.

They will. The FWC has no authority over designating what is or isn't a legal area to shoot. Therefore we can't tell you it's legal to shoot on a permit in an area the city or county has designated otherwise.

Mainly comes down to what the county has zoned the area. In most areas, as long it is not zoned residential, you should be okay. For your golf course ideally it would zoned rural/agricultural, so check with the owners, they would know.

As for being a nuisance remover, well brother, you can have it! :D Actually in NE Florida, especially Duval, Clay and St Johns Counties, you probably would get some calls. Bigger cities have a lot of people who don't want to touch wildlife, but most get annoyed when they find out that they have to pay to have an animal removed.

Good Luck,
Gator

ballistic gelatin
March 31, 2002, 10:37 PM
Hey Gator.

I acutally signed up for Nassau, Duval and St. Johns. I figured that would be as far as I would care to travel for any golf course work. Lots of acreage means lots of money.
As for being a nuisance remover, well brother, you can have it!
Come on now, explain yourself. Save me the heartaches. I might, just might, be able to learn from others mistakes, err, experiences.

mec
April 1, 2002, 12:15 PM
best deal is to just scatter some mothballs around. Armadillos hate those and will leave.

redneck
April 1, 2002, 03:14 PM
Never had a horse break its leg in a hole either. It is a possibility though, especially if the rider isn't watching where there going. Some horses seem to have all sense of self preservation and intelligience bred out of them. A couple years back some people were boarding a thoroughbred in my barn. They let it out to the pasture and it ran full tilt and tried to jump a 5 foot tall, 16 ft long gate that was half way open (all it had to do was go to the RIGHT side instead of the left) The gate caught it at the knees and it did a flying somersault into the pasture :D, skinned up but not seriously hurt. I would have no trouble beleiving it stepped in a hole and hurt itself.
The bigger problem with holes is they can mess up the wheels on a tractor or implement really easily. Bent rims and flat tires are a real PITA when your in the opposite end of the field as your truck.

Art Eatman
April 1, 2002, 05:16 PM
Well, a horse ain't nuthin' but a vet bill, waitin' on an opportunity. At least they're not as dumb as a domestic turkey. :D

Hadn't heard about the mothball deal, before. Mothballs are camphor, as in Campho-Phenique liniment. A little sprinkle, here; a little sprinkle, there...:)

Seems like it'd be more fun to cap off a two-foot piece of 8" well casing, tie some earthworms to a 1/4-stick of dynamite and play "Launch-a-diller".

:D, Art

C.R.Sam
April 1, 2002, 08:08 PM
My mothballs are naphthalene. Put em in the hole when plantin things. Keeps the gophers away. Put em on the window sill keeps the javalina out of the kitchen when the snow is deep.

Horses are good for cross country transportation. You will always have food.

Sam

swampgator
April 2, 2002, 01:44 AM
ballistic:
Come on now, explain yourself. Save me the heartaches. I might, just might, be able to learn from others mistakes, err, experiences.

Well for starters, the people you deal with! Callers, or customers, in your case, can range from deathly afraid to extrememly annoying. I couldn't imagine having to deal with them face to face.

Second, the dreaded "there's something dead under my doublewide" complaint. And no, FWC does not crawl around in attics to remove dead racoons. That goes over real well with old ladies.

Finally the rules dealing with nuisance removal, ie can't transport live racoons, meaning you cap them in place.

Overall, unless it's something like you've got at the golf course I personally wouldn't bother. That's just me. If I were going to do it, I would limit myself (if in your case) to the golf course and select animals, ie beaver, coyotes, hogs, etc. I'm not willing to drive 60 miles to make 20 bucks getting a possum out of trash can.

A really good thing to get is training to deal with venomous reptiles, but that takes up to a year to get permits for. You can pretty much write your own ticket with one of those.

Again if it's something you want to do, cool. Just keep it in perspective. BTW you can call me at 1-800-342-8105 if you have any questions, but I'm off til Friday at midnight. Or you can leave a msg for "Cord".

Later.